Treme 4 Seasons 2010

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Season 1
Available on Prime
(669) IMDb 8.1/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime

1. Do You Know What It Means TV-MA CC

(Series Premiere) A New Orleans neighborhood celebrates its first second-line 'parade' since Katrina, reuniting many of its musicians and residents, though many more have yet to return.

Starring:
Khandi Alexander, Rob Brown
Runtime:
1 hour 20 minutes
Original air date:
April 11, 2010

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Do You Know What It Means [HD]

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Season 1
Available on Prime

Customer Reviews

Good story line, great actors and great music!
bkmaster1
Culture, Pride, Music, History, Food: it is the story of New Orleans but of you also, and your life.
L. Mcclung
Really makes me miss New Orleans and want to go back!
D

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

144 of 162 people found the following review helpful By Jazz Baby on April 17, 2010
Format: DVD
The premier episode, "Do You Know What it Means", is a work of art. It will easily bear repeated watching because of its outstanding writing and masterful use of the indigenous music.

Not to mention the great acting, many levels of meaning, clever cameos and true-to-life subplots. And most of all: a major media production has finally "got it" about New Orleans, and got it right!

The entire series is "a love letter to New Orleans".

Signed,
A New Orleanian from Treme who has actually lived the show
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Tom on June 14, 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I just finished watching the last episode of this first season of "Treme." I picked up the Season 1 box based on recommendations alone, and the fact that I've enjoyed other HBO series. I'm near speechless. I can't believe how deeply this series got under my skin. The first few episodes, beautifully crafted as they are, didn't grab me in the way other outstanding cable shows (Mad Men, Breaking Bad, etc.) have done. I stayed with it, though, and I'm glad I did. By halfway into the season, I started feeling the characters and plot lines big time, and by this final episode, I wish it didn't have to end. I'm sure others here have raved about the performances, the music, the stunning cinematography, and all that. It's true: the series is worth every penny of the admittedly pricey box set. Ultimately, though, "Treme" is more than the sum of its parts. It captures something that ordinary words can't, similar to the way a poem can't be reduced to a linear narrative or second-hand description. You have to be in it to get it. But give yourself to this show, give it your time and your attention, and it pays off like no other series I've ever seen.
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48 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Michael D. Williams on July 21, 2010
Format: DVD
I loved the series. The New Orleans Blues and Jazz music woven throughout the series was fantastic. It was especially interesting as many real and famous musicians were used in the story. The individual characters are interesting and varied. John Goodman was a hoot! Khandi Alexander (CSI: Miami 2002-2009) was really strong, but her stomach here was not. Very different from CSI. Musicians Trombone Shorty, Elvis Costello, and John Boutte, to name but a few, were great. Also the racial mix was a strength to the series and the reality of the real New Orleans and story of Hurricane Katrina.

I especially found the graphics during the credits roll interesting. Who would of thought that mold and fungus stains on walls, floors, and ceilings could look like art. Being interested also in biology and photography, I found the house mold interesting to look at, to itself artistic, even though it is often a serious health hazard. A great idea for a photo project: someone should photograph the mold stains of New Orleans with Ultraviolet light (Black Light). Many molds are UV fluorescent!

Anyway, it is a fantastic series, can't wait for Season Two and for this DVD set to be available. The only downer for me was the latter part of the season's final episode got a bit busy and confusing -- not their best work. Seems like the producer, director, and writers did not really want to do a season finale, eliminating some characters, but just keep going with the story lines into the next season. Wish there were a bit more about the foods of New Orleans and the Creole / Cajun South. But then you can't really taste food on TV.
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40 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Alberta on June 24, 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I never made it to New Orleans. This show made that lack so poignant. The show was beautifully written, well-acted, great visuals, and the music was incredible! I love all the new (to me) music this show introduced me to. I wish it had gone on.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Joe Smoe on July 26, 2010
Format: DVD
There hasn't been a show on TV that has intertwined music and drama as well-ever-as "Treme."

And, BTW, it IS coming back for a second season next year. HBO renewed the show the day after it premiered.
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Dante on August 13, 2010
Format: DVD
Thanks to a friend sending me videos of this show from the States, I was able to enjoy this series, and am looking forward to it continuing. Very interested in buying the season 1 dvds, but am worried about the music used in the show. One of the things I really enjoyed was the music, and I hope that the dvd release will have the exact same soundtrack as what was broadcast. Have been disappointed before by a dvd movie that had some of the songs changed due to copyright problems. I also hope there are some good extras included on the dvds, maybe some more music. At any rate, looking forward to watching this again on dvd.
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29 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Howard Wuelfing on April 16, 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I really should be doing a video rant ala Crayton but...I ADORE this series. Brilliant writing, it's flaunting conventional wisdom of narrative flow and pacing makes for a uniquely immersive viewing experience. And its richness of obscure, yet accurate details of the history and experience of living in New Orleans invites a level of active participation that proves highly addictive. BUT...

The DVDs screen DISTINCTLY DARK - appreciably darker than the original broadcasts. So are simply technologically flawed -- and there's no reason for this other than HBO's lack of quality control.

As per the extras:
"The Music of Treme" in-episode viewing mode - perfunctory and ultimately pathetic. The pop up boxes list song title and the person performing it on screen, no mention of the writer or the performer that the song is most closely associated with or any of their history.

For instance, in the scene where Annie is accompanying pianist Tom McDermott at a private party and they're playing "New Orleans Bump" (could be titled, "New Orleans Blues" - I'm writing this in a rush early Saturday morning) - the pop up window says: "New Orleans Bump" Tom McDermott. There's no mention that it was written, originally performed and recorded by Jelly Roll Morton and as Morton is one of the originators of Jazz and inarguably one of the seminal figures in New Orleans music history that information might have also been useful.

Moreover, a lot of music is not thus notated at all -- the Mardi Gras Indian chants, songs playing on the radio or jukeboxes, etc.

The audio Music Commentaries are also shockingly lame. In the scene noted above the commentators say "That's Jelly Roll Morton.
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