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Comment: This is an ExLibrary item REFURBISHED media (Disk) with no marks or scratches. Media cartridge, if applicable, appears functional. Packaging may show slight signs of wear as may the cover art, liner notes and inserts. Ultaviolet Digital Copy Code, if applicable, is not Valid/Available.
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Doa


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Audio CD, December 2, 1993
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (December 2, 1993)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Mute U.S.
  • ASIN: B000003Z5C
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #372,431 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. I.B.M.
2. Hit By A Rock
3. United
4. Valley Of The Shadow Of Death - Peter Christopherson
5. Dead On Arrival
6. Weeping - Genesis P-Orridge
7. Hamburger Lady
8. Hometime - Cosey Fanni Tutti
9. AB/7A - Chris Carter
10. E-Coli
11. Death Threats - Anonymous
12. Walls Of Sound
13. Blood On The Floor
14. Five Knuckle Shuffle
15. We Hate You (Little Girls)

Editorial Reviews

No Description Available
No Track Information Available
Media Type: CD
Artist: THROBBING GRISTLE
Title: D.O.A.
Street Release Date: 11/29/1993
Domestic
Genre: ROCK/POP

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By J. Brady on October 27, 2004
Format: Audio CD
For those who think they've heard it all....Throbbing Gristle is the sound of the begining of the end. Truly frightening. Screaming, tape loops, random noise collages, recorded conversations, primitive synthesizers. Revolutionary and hugely influential, and this is over 25 years old ! D.O.A. makes Skinny Puppy sound like Snoopy, makes Ministry sound like a church choir, and makes Nine Inch Nails sound like sewing needles. I'm only sorry it took me this long to discover Throbbing Gristle.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Mark Bychowski on January 14, 2005
Format: Audio CD
here's those plucky kids from TG to entertain you on this, their second release & first one to be primarily studio recordings. at this point in their career (3 years after forming), perhaps they were tired of being pigeonholed as a sick all-noise band, so they begin to stretch out by including a solo recording from each throbbing member. as they each contribute something different to the mix, plus they were a band where each person stood out with a unique personality, i'd like to compare each solo recording with the solo equivalent of another band that released solo material from all 4 members that year: kiss. sleazy's "valley of the shadow..." is, like peter criss' entire album, filler. also, if you're gonna be all dark & gross & ... well, sleazy, at least try not to be BORING! speaking of boring, here's cosey's "hometime", which compares to paul stanley's solo; it SOUNDS like TG (very atmospheric with found sound overlaid), but it just kind of lays there, quite inert. at least its half as long as sleazy's, so its here and gone before you know it. chris' "ab/7" is the epiphany of the album. its a SONG - a melodic, danceable, catchy one. chris always seemed out of place in TG (the musician vs the "artistes"), but this short piece established he had a future on his own, just like ace frehley's rockin' lp. which leaves us with little gen, who so obviously is the gene simmons of the group, but here, he catches you off guard. "weeping" is a very heartfelt sad song about gen being dumped by paul stanley, very original sounding, and extremely suprising, much like gene singing "when you wish upon a star", except much much much better.
all this said, the group compositions in the studio ("Dead on Arrival", "Hamburger Lady", "IBM") are among the best they ever did, and the live cuts "hit by a rock" and "blood on the floor" are the first outright signs of TG possessing a "normal" sense of humor (or at least as normal a sense as they could possess).
a cool platter!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By DAC Crowell on January 26, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Coming out of the aural sludgefest of '2nd Annual Report', Throbbing Gristle started wresting its noise into song-like structures on this release. And it does work. Like the following release, '20 Jazz-funk Greats', this is a seminally-important release from the early period of industrial music from the people who pioneered the term. Hints of the more polished, sequenced electronics that were to come can be found on 'AB/7A', but by and large, this album is more the domain of the noise-mass approach from their prior release, with things wrested into more 'manageable' chunks. But by no means does this mean this is a 'basic sophomore' effort; rather, this is where the real ride begins for those wanting to get deeper into TG's catalog.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. M. Myers on November 12, 2008
Format: Audio CD
I've listened to this album exactly once, on a pair of headphones. The experience was so thrilling and unsettling that I don't know which I'm more afraid of -- that listening to it twice would diminish the impact, or that it wouldn't.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By The Pitiful Anonymous on January 29, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Throbbing Gristle's "Dead On Arrival- The 3rd and Final Report of Throbbing Gristle" is one of the most inventive albums ever produced. Every track has a completely different approach. It's as if with each track they started from scratch and scrapped past methods. With little to no exception, every track on DOA is a successful exercise in anti-musical atmospherics.

In my opinion the most successful tracks are-
"Weeping" is haunting and menacing, a violin masterpiece with a real melody and an organic feel. One of TG's most memorable moments. "Hamburger Lady" is another fantastic track, supposedly simulating the feel of the inside of a hospital ward where a burn victim resides. It kind of reminds me of driving in intense rain with the wipers going. "E-Coli" combines low synth with cornet and samples of dialogue related to the E-Coli virus, very effective as well. "Walls of Sound" is several TG performances spliced together, sounds a bit like a construction yard.

Some of the other pieces-
"I.B.M" is an inhuman and somewhat grating beginning to the album. "In the Valley of the Shadow of Death" is the first real ambient piece on the album, a spacious, 'grey' feeling mix of static, conversation and weather. This is followed by "Dead on Arrival" which is sort of reminiscient of a moving vehicle or working machine. "Hometime" is supposed to capture the feeling of being at home after school as a child (according to Cosey) and does so, with soft echoing guitar notes. "AB/7A" is a great early synth song. There are also some live snippets, a sped up version of older song "United", some death threats left on TG's answering machines, and 2 bonus songs from singles released in the era in which this was released on vinyl.
Read more ›
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 18, 1998
Format: Audio CD
Beautiful industrial music for beautiful industrial people. TG invented the noisy, grim aesthetic and this is their swan song. "Weeping" will stay with you for years.
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