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Doctor De Soto (Book & CD Set) (MacMillan Young Listeners) Paperback – Unabridged, January 4, 2011


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Series: MacMillan Young Listeners
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan Young Listeners; Unabridged edition (January 4, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1427211183
  • ISBN-13: 978-1427211187
  • Product Dimensions: 10.5 x 8.6 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #887,221 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Doctor De Soto is a well-respected mouse-dentist who runs a successful practice with his wife (and able assistant) Mrs. De Soto. The De Sotos are friendly and professional toward all their patients, from chipmunks to donkeys to cows, the exception being "cats and other dangerous animals," as stated clearly on the sign outside the office. But the De Sotos are tender-hearted rodents, so when a miserable fox shows up begging for treatment, they agree to have a look (perhaps against their better judgment). As it turns out, this fox, with "a rotten bicuspid and unusually bad breath," manages to behave himself while tiny Doctor De Soto is standing mid-molar inside his gaping jaws. When the wily fox returns the next day to get his replacement gold tooth, however, he has mouse-flavored snacks on his mind. Luckily, Doctor De Soto and his wife have anticipated such despicable canine intentions, and find a way to outfox the ungrateful fox.

William Steig, award-winning creator of Sylvester and the Magic Pebble, once again offers young readers a clever, amusing tale of interspecies mingling. As usual, Steig's tone is matter-of-fact, and his enchanting illustrations of the responsible mouse couple and their foxy adversary are alive with expression and emotion. Kids will appreciate the De Sotos' wit, and will be delighted to read more about this diminutive couple's adventures in Doctor De Soto Goes to Africa. (Ages 4 to 8) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

A somewhat unusual--and ravenous--patient is outfoxed by the resourceful mouse-dentist in this sly tale of mischief. Ages 3-up.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

William Steig (1907-2003) published his first children's book, Roland the Minstrel Pig, in 1968, and received the Caldecott Medal for Sylvester and the Magic Pebble (978-1416902065) in 1970. His works also include The Amazing Bone, a Caldecott Honor Book, and Abel's Island and Doctor De Soto, both Newbery Honor Books. His most recent books published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux are Shrek! (released by DreamWorks as a major motion picture) and Wizzil, illustrated by Quentin Blake. School Library Journal named Shrek! a Best Book of 1990 and said of it, "Steig's inimitable wit and artistic dash have never been sharper or more expertly blended."

Customer Reviews

I recently picked this book up again after reading it as a kid.
Ilana Waters
William Steig's books are very funny both to adults and children, which is an amazing accomplishment if you think about it.
M. C. Crammer
Dr. De Soto and his wife are up all night, knowing that when the dentist inserts the gold tooth, the fox will eat them.
Ohioan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Nathalie Wilson on January 19, 2003
Format: Paperback
On Friday afternoon, I was talking to my younger sister at a Denny's restaurant, when, out of nowhere, the storyline image of this book came into mind. I am currently seventeen years old, and even though it was more than ten years ago, I was still able to vividly recall to my sister (who is thirteen) all of the wonderful images of the fox, donkey, and alligator that I had enjoyed so long ago. She also began remembering different parts of the book since I had shared it with her when we were younger, and we excitedly spoke about the clever dentist and his antics.
This is one book that has stuck out in my mind as a childhood favorite (even though I still am somewhat of a kid) and I'm sure your child will come to love and cherish this book as well.
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By M. C. Crammer VINE VOICE on September 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
I've given it as a present several times.

William Steig's books are very funny both to adults and children, which is an amazing accomplishment if you think about it.

The story involves a mouse dentist, Dr. DeSoto, who has a fox present himself for dental work. Normally Dr. DeSoto doesn't work on carnivorous patients, but he feels sorry for the fox, who has a toothache. Even while Dr. DeSoto is fixing the fox's tooth, however, the fox is thinking about what a tasty treat his dentist will be.

The humor lies in William Steig's use of language -- he is well known for not talking down to children, but slipping in some wonderful "big words" that children love to hear and that increase their vocabularies painlessly.

I can't imagine anyone not finding this book entertaining. William Steig will be greatly missed.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By goonius on July 8, 2009
Format: Paperback
We stumbled onto our copy of Doctor DeSoto in the bargain bin of our local thrift store. It's about the best dime I've ever spent.

My daughter (3.5 years old) loves this book. For weeks it's been her favorite, she just can't get enough. She now insists that we call her Dr. De Soto, which may suggest some deeper pathology, but nonetheless is quite a hearty vote for the appeal of this book to young children.

The great thing is that, like many of Steig's books, it's a pleasure to read too. His animals are so fun, so lively, and capture the essence of their human counterparts so effectively.

Steig has an indescribably fantastic way with words. The fox doesn't just wonder if he should eat the De Sotos, he wonders if it would "be shabby of him."

After reading this book, we researched Steig and ordered a whole slew of his books. After all, if you enjoy what you're reading to your kids, you will read to them all the more. This book is one you can't go wrong with.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Shanna A. Gonzalez on May 15, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Dr. DeSoto, a mouse, has a standing policy of never treating predators at his dental practice. One day, a fox appears and pleads for help, weeping so that Dr. and Mrs. DeSoto take pity on him and agree to replace his abscessed tooth. While helping him they realize he intends to eat them after his treatment is finished, and they devise a clever way to outwit him while still finishing the job.

The story is satisfying on many levels. It builds on the principle of Aesop's fable of the crane and the wolf, showing that evil people will return evil for good. But the dentist and his wife demonstrate wisdom in doing good for this evil character, refusing to go back on their commitment yet not denying their real danger. In working together, this husband and wife team demonstrate courage, unity, and mutual care, exemplifying the kind of marriage I want to be defined as normal for my children.

Steig tells the story in an understated way, with effective dialogue and gentle humor. Children will wait anxiously to find out how the two mice will resolve their problem, and will greatly enjoy the fox's discomfiture when he is defeated. This is an excellent early-reader story about how to deal with evil in the everyday world.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 14, 1997
Format: Paperback
I'm 10 now but still enjoy all of Steig's books. I read them still, in bed. This is a very funny and witty book, and I think all young children should read it. Dr.DeSoto is a nice character,as all of Steig's are. I recomend this book to anyone looking for some laughs.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. D. Wall on October 22, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Recommended to me by a kindergarden teacher, I sent this to my grandsons. Their Mommy said that they loved it!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By ABF on March 12, 2009
Format: Paperback
We read this to my daughter before her first visit to the dentist. I thought it did a good job of preparing her for what to expect at the dentist. At the same time, it's a funny book- for everyone! Also, if you think about it, it's the dentist who's scared- not the patient, so it helps to allay a child's fears about the dentist. Great book!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on January 16, 2004
Format: Paperback
The author William Steig will be forever missed for his clever and delightful stories for the kiddie set. In "Doctor De Soto", Steig places the action in a land where such stories as "Sylvester and the Magic Pebble" have taken place. In the story, animals of all types interact just as humans do, all the while retaining some very wild aspects. The story takes place in what looks to be the 1930s. As in Steig's "When Everybody Wore a Hat", the animals look as if they'd be comfortable listening to the radio and discussing President Roosevelt's reforms before going to bed each night. Dr. De Soto is a mouse dentist, who runs a quiet family practice with his wife. Normally, the De Soto's do not treat carnivorous animals but that rule changes when a pitiful fox comes to them with a toothache. Steig's drawings are sometimes easily dismissed as simplistic. This is not the case. Tiny details dot the illustrations, giving each page the feel of a snapshot into another world. The stairs leading to the De Soto office are separated into two types, large for bigger animals (donkeys, pigs, etc.) and smaller for woodland creatures. Dr. De Soto himself has set up a series of pulleys that allow him to work in the larger animals' mouths. Kids will like the book, gleefully observing the picture where a bloody infected tooth is pulled from the fox's mouth (little droplets of blood falling to the ground). If there is a moral to the story, it's probably to be vigilant. But who picks up a Steig book for a moral? This is just a fun piece of kid literature that everyone will like. It probably works best as an introductory text to the world of William Steig. Just be sure not to miss it.
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