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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Groundbreaking music that made Dr. Who the show it was, April 8, 2004
This review is from: Doctor Who: At the BBC Radiophonic Workshop 2 (Audio CD)
"Music, effects, atmospheres and ambiences from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop," to quote material from the verso. Electronic music became a part of the BBCRW, which from the 1960's, broke ground in creative use of sound in TV programmes, and Dr. Who was one area that saw the fruit of its labours realised. The 1970's was a peak period for such, as eerie space age music and special sounds found themselves on during the Jon Pertwee years (1970-1974) and Tom Baker years (1974-1981). They sure give a more space-age atmosphere compared to the conventional orchestral arrangements of Star Trek and Star Wars.
This is demonstrated in the evolution of the Dr. Who theme music, which had a new edit from Ron Grainer's original theme from 1963, introducing a stuttering motif in the opening title music. The stereo version deleted the stuttering, and served until 1980, where the keyboards were more hard-edged, reflecting the synth-rock of Jean-Michel Jarre. A short-lived variation, the Delaware version by Paddy Kingsland, featuring a twangier, uptempo, higher pitched organ crossed with a kazoo arrangement, with bleeping computerized sounds interspersed, was only used on two stories before being dropped.
The highlight of this technological evolution comes from the EMS Synthi 100 synthesizer, named the Delaware. A modular analogue synthesizer with dials that took up a whole room It's weirdness is demonstrated in Malcolm Clarke's score of the 1973 story The Sea Devils, consisting of short selections that make up tracks 13 through 37 of the CD. This is the most avant, cutting edge sound I've heard on Dr. Who. As said in the inner sleeve, Clarke's sound "eschews conventional tonality and replaces even remotely-recognisable timbre with a palette of weird pulsings and semi-random noise." Call him the Ornette Coleman of synth music. This will either give one a headache or if one imbibes certain psychedelic substances or liquids, quite a trip. Some of Add N To X's music sounded like this.
However, Delia Darbyshire's contributions to Inferno, my second favourite Who story, are my faves because of the quiet, unearthly, eerie, and haunting sounds, mostly from "Blue Veils and Golden Sands" which makes one feel as if they're on some weird and strange alien world. Ditto for the airy and hypnotic "The Delian Mode," which utilized her emphasis on basic oscillators and tape cutting techniqures.
The ominous theme for The Keller Machine, the evil mind parasite that kills people by their deepest fears, matches the threat posed by the alien, a pulsing and fuzzy, mixed with a high-pitched organ, a variation on the theme of the Doctor's archenemy the Master.
Among the sound effects include the wheezing and groaning sound of the TARDIS landing, the ghostly wind effects and clinking chimes from The Monster Of Peladon and the keening and whistling, haunted house atmosphere from Planet Of The Spiders (the scene where the Doctor is in the cave).
Count the BBC Radiophonic Workshop and people like Delia Darbyshire and Malcolm Clarke in the ranks of Wendy Carlos, Goblin, Can, and Kraftwerk in the evolution of synthesizer music.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The musical oddity continues, December 3, 2000
This review is from: Doctor Who: At the BBC Radiophonic Workshop 2 (Audio CD)
Following on from the first in the series, this CD has the advantage that it contains longer pieces than the first (49 rather than 75 tracks).
It's a mixed bag. The music from 'Inferno' is great, while that from 'The Sea Devils' is extremely impenetrable and potentially painful for some listeners (possibly to be put on at the end of a very long party for those guests who just won't leave).
There are also several versions of the Doctor Who opening and closing music, including the wisely unused Delaware version (so-called because of the synthesier it was performed on), which has emerged on the video for 'Carnival of Monsters'.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb Music from the 1970's!, October 1, 2000
By 
Gian-luca Di Rocco (Markham, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Doctor Who: At the BBC Radiophonic Workshop 2 (Audio CD)
This CD features music, effects and atmospheres from Doctor Who episodes first broadcast in the 1970's. The majoriy of the music from the album is the 43 minute soundtrack to The Sea Devils, composed and realised by Malcolm Clarke. This music is some of the most original, innovative and evocative music the TV series had to offer. Fans of progressive rock music in particular ought to enjoy this section of the CD. However, the CD is over 79 minutes long, and features tracks from a lot of other stories, including almost 10 minutes of atmospheric music from Inferno composes by Delia Derbyshire herself. And as a special bonus there is some previously un-released music by Peter Howell used as demo's for the Horns of Nimon, but not used in the tv series. The demo's presage how the music would sound in the 1980's, and is very enjoyable. Here's hoping a 1980's volume will be coming out soon.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Sea Devils and other goodies., April 19, 2004
By 
Joel Henderson (Portland, OR United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Doctor Who: At the BBC Radiophonic Workshop 2 (Audio CD)
Doctor Who at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop Vol.2 takes a slightly different approach than its immediate predecessor. While Vol. 1 mainly contained sound effects with a few tracks of ambient music, Vol. 2 is almost completely about music. The CD starts with the rarely heard full length "Stutter-edit" of the Doctor Who theme from Season 7. After which begins a short suite of sound effects and music from the final serial of Season 7, Inferno. For non-fans, these are Blue Veils and Golden Sands (heard very briefly in episode 2) and The Delian Mode (Used to underscore the Alternitive universe in Episodes 3-6). Both pieces were composed by the late Delia Derbyshire, whom of course was responsible for the creation of the signiture tune as much as composer Ron Grainer. It's also interesting to note that neither of these pieces were composed for Doctor Who originally, instead they're stock tracks taken from the 1969 LP "BBC Radiophonic Music".

Dudley Simpson makes a return appearance with three cues from his classic score for The Mind of Evil and one from The Claws of Axos. Most of Simpson's music unfortunetly does not survive today so these tracks are a treat for fans and listeners alike.

After the Doctor Who ending theme (another rarely heard version, the 1'10 one), The Sea Devils soundtrack begins. This is electronic music at its most extreme with the late Malcolm Clarke pushing the EMS Synthi 100 synthesizer to its absolute max. It's a wholly listenable piece but some people may be turned off by its malevolent stop-go pace.

A pseudo-stereo single version of the theme from 1973 (you may recognize this from some of the older OOP releases on Silva) as well as a newly discovered stereo version of the infamous Delaware version lead into a collection of sound effects from the latter Jon Pertwee and Tom Baker stories. After which comes a pair of demo tapes by Peter Howell recorded for episode two of the serial The Horns of Nemon. Fans of Howell's score for The Leisure Hive will notice the similarities between that piece and these demos. The CD closes with the re-recorded version of the Doctor Who theme written for season 18.

This is a terrific CD and a great buy. The Sea Devils may not be to everyone's cup of tea however.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Selection of Incidental Music from Doctor Who, September 27, 2000
By 
Gian-luca Di Rocco (Markham, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Doctor Who: At the BBC Radiophonic Workshop 2 (Audio CD)
This CD is a great selection of sounds from the 1970's era Doctor Who. The CD is nearly 80 minutes in length, with a full 43 minutes of incidental music to the Sea Devils, some of the most interesting and evocative music ever to accompany the TV series. Music and effects from many other stories are featured, including music composed by Delia Derbyshire herself which featured in Inferno, a particular highlight for myself. Also featured is some previously unreleased incidental music by Peter Howell that JNT asked him to compose for the Horns of Nimon as an example of how the series might sound with the music done in-house at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. It's brilliant. If you are a Doctor Who fan, a fan of experimental or progressive music, or just have an open mind (or all three!) then purchase this CD.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Haunting memories, August 28, 2001
By 
Joe S Stewart (Minneapolis, MN United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: At the BBC Radiophonic Workshop 2 (Audio CD)
I purchased Doctor Who at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop v.1 The Early Years in a record shop and immediately fell in love with it, listening to it as I drifted off to sleep for many nights (which might account for many weird dreams). I was uncertain about purchasing v.2, but am now glad I did. I had forgotten about the background atmospheres for Inferno because...they were in the background. Taken out of context, they become very interesting works of electronic music. The various sound effects for The Mind of Evil, The Peladon stories, Planet of the Spiders, Ark in Space, and Destiny of the Daleks are a delight to hear anew. Unfortunately, there seems to be a mad dash through the Tom Baker era simply because so much time is spent on The Sea Devils (I suppose this accounts for a separate Baker era CD release). Hearing Malcolm Clarke's radical electronic score again taken out of context allows one to experience his music with fresh ears, although I would not suggest this as casual listening for anyone without a music degree and a taste for analog electronic music. One can hear not only the repeated usage of the Doctor Who theme, but also variations of Dies Irae which has been quoted innumerable times in classical music throughout the ages. Overall, I would recommend this CD to hardcore Doctor Who fans or those with an interest in the gritty golden age of analog electronic music, a genre that has been lost in today's crisp, digital world.
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4.0 out of 5 stars More more more, February 27, 2002
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This review is from: Doctor Who: At the BBC Radiophonic Workshop 2 (Audio CD)
Again, this is a fairly good CD. However, much of it is comprised of previously released material. I expected to hear more of the eerie sounds of INFERNO (my favorite Jon Pertwee) rather than the two tracks that had been released on Earthshock CD some ten years ago. (Can anyone tell that the INFERNO sounds were sped up from those used in THE WHEEL IN SPACE?) And did we have to listen to the title track 3 times on the same CD? What a waste!
What WAS fun was listening to the SEA DEVILS in almost entirety. But perhaps this could have been released as itself?
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5.0 out of 5 stars A must have for Dr. Who Fan's, December 27, 2012
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This review is from: Doctor Who: At the BBC Radiophonic Workshop 2 (Audio CD)
An awesome collection for any Dr. Who fan. Very enjoyable sound, This was a Christmas gift for my daughter who appreciates old Dr.Who yep the ones on VHS. She was very happy with this. Item arrived promptly and was well packaged. Recommend.
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