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Doctor Who: The Coming Of The Terraphiles (Doctor Who (BBC Paperback)) Paperback – August 4, 2011


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Product Details

  • Series: Doctor Who (BBC Paperback) (Book 10)
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: BBC Books; Reprint edition (August 4, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849901406
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849901406
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #276,818 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

A marriage made in heaven, or perhaps Gallifrey. As a teenager Michael Moorcock was my favourite author, and Doctor Who my favourite TV programme. Why no one has ever put the two of them together before I don't know,Delicious. The modern genre's most original voice has invited the Doctor into his multiverse for an adventure sparkling with wit and peril... Authentic Moorcock. Authentic Who. An essential read,A combination of Moorcockian multiverse and Wodehousian Comedy filigreed into something magical and unexpected. It's Doctor Who written by the most important living British fantasist, and it's as good as I'd hoped, and much funnier,Delightfully good-humored... an authentically Moorcockian take on both Doctor Who and that most whimsical of themes - the coming of ultimate chaos and the annihilation of the universe itself!,We are astoundingly lucky to have Michael Moorcock. In his range, his skill, invention and his passion he exemplifies the very best of more than one literary tradition,Here we have one of science fiction and fantasy's most respected and well-loved authors writing Doctor Who. What could possibly go wrong? The answer is absolutely nothing. This is a phenomenal book - 10/10,Exhilarating, funny and deeply peculiar...It's been years since the Doctor Who range put out anything as smart and engaging as this. Fingers crossed it's the first of many such volumes,A bold, eccentric quasi space opera,The great Michael Moorcock has written a Doctor Who book which is like Burt Bacharach knocking out an album for Lady Gaga

About the Author

A prolific writer of more than eighty works of fiction and non-fiction, including the Guardian Fiction Prize-winning The Condition of Muzak, and Mother London, which was shortlisted for the Whitbread Prize, Michael Moorcock is the creator of such memorable characters as Elric, Jerry Cornelius and Colonel Pyat. Born in London in 1939, he now lives in Texas.

More About the Author

Born in London in 1939, Michael Moorcock now lives in Texas. A prolific and award-winning writer with more than eighty works of fiction and non-fiction to his name, he is the creator of Elric, Jerry Cornelius and Colonel Pyat, amongst many other memorable characters.

Customer Reviews

I found this book dull and very difficult to get through.
ThetaSigma
The Doctor and Amy were mostly relegated to cameos within the book's chapters while Moorcock focused solely on his own characters in the story line.
Lashala
Either way, it's the same style of writing which I think many of his fans regard as poetic.
Benjamin M Cowell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jordan Hofer on September 15, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
Michael Moorcock's Doctor Who novel is sheer nonsense and fun, much how the Doctor Who series was like before it was rebooted. What the hell is going on? Who the hell knows? Much of it is totally absurdist theater, just like the older series of Doctor Who. It makes no sense at the beginning, and by the end you still don't know what the hell it was all about. I loved that about Doctor Who, and I loved that Moorcock had the guts to write it. The Bubbly Boys? Frank and Freddie Force? WTF? Wonderful writing! This was a fun book that cared bullocks for continuity. I'm afraid Doctor Who fans are becoming like the new wave of Star Trek fans who demanded continuity in their universe until they dulled it down into an unpalatable mush. Moorcock brought the Doctor and Amy into his multiverse and just let fly, with ridiculous plot twists concerning ladies' hats too heavy to wear, sailing ships in space, centaurs cracking nuts, a world gone topsy-turvy, and a lovelorn loser firing the "Arrow of Law" into a black hole! If you have an imagination that allows for the absurd, then sit back with this fine Moorcock novel and enjoy Doctor Who both as you've never seen it and as it used to be.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Fred on January 2, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Come on folks, get over wanting a multiverse in whatever style you were used to by the author. This is a great Dr. Who book and better than the other ones on the 11th doctor so far. A true novel sized adventure that rocks for the latest doctor and Amy. There is a lot of Douglas Adams type satire that kept me chuckling through a good part of the reading. The future olympic style games were a bit confusing at first, but riveting. The characters were something you would expect out of Douglas Adams, except this is Michael Moorcock. Now I have read a little bit of Moorcock's work, but never the multiverse series so I was not let down as some readers were. The book can be enjoyed even if you have never heard of the multiverse as the Dr. Who stories on TV have always indicated there is that type of organization or disorganization in the universe. Also a spiritual aspect in regard to creation. I highly recommend this book. I will say that I will probably never read Moorcock's multiverse series (no offense Michael, it is more a matter of time) unless the Doctor and Amy return.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By BobSteve on June 29, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Mike Moorcock takes Doctor Who, slaps him at the end of time with P.G. Wodehouse and takes the mick. I can see why Doctor Who fans might have been frustrated by this book, especially those who didn't actually READ the book but listened to a multi-disc reading of it. Some things can be adapted like that, and some can't. As Moorcock has evolved over the years the subtleties and nuances of his writing just don't lend themselves to dramatic adaptation.
The basic concept of this story is a fun romp in a goofy far distant future but the language, the in-jokes, the internal references to Moorcock's own creations from other books would be meaningless to anyone who hasn't read him before. I like Dr Who. I love Mike Moorcock. Combined the two make for a frothy brew for someone like me, but if you are just a straight ahead Dr Who fan (and believe me I sat and watched the pilot episode in 1963 so I know what I'm talking about) you just might not get it. Moorcock really is a genius. He's a superb writer and it is plainly evident to a long-time fan that he is just having fun stomping around the Doctor's universe. Let's face it there isn't a thing in this book that is any goofier than that stretched out piece of talking skin in one of the early Chris Eccleston episodes. If you came to Doctor Who late in the game, and by that I mean any time since 2005, then you're likely taking it too seriously. Doctor Who was one big wacky p*ss-take since Patrick Troughton took over from Mr Grumpy. It got serious for a while in recent years but it's never been respectable and that's why it's fun. Just because you stick a respectable author in that universe don't expect a literary masterpiece. Bottom line is Moorcock "gets it". This is supposed to be looney and it is. I liked it, silly hat and all.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mark Wentworth on December 5, 2010
Format: Hardcover
As a Dr. Who adventure, it might leave fans of the new Doctor a little underwhelmed. It really is more of a Moorcock tale (and a fine one at that!) guest starring the Doctor. Moorcock does capture the essence of the Doctor and Amy nicely, but if you haven't explored MM's Multiverse, this book might not hold your attention.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Disneymarvel on August 13, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Though it took me a while to get into this book, once I dedicated the time to it, I was hooked! Great read with a great Doctor and even greater companions!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S. L. Starr on June 19, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I read on some online list that this was a good introduction to Moorcock's multiverse. If so, good. I would like to read more of Moorcock. This was a fun take on the Doctor (old or new). I would have liked more of Captain Cornelius. But the Doctor and Amy and their cohort of more-English-than-English aliens are all good. I don't know how I would rank this as an introduction to a broader mythology. But as a stand alone piece of entertainment it is great.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Schwent on September 25, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In the far future, The Doctor and Amy fall in with a group of historical reenacters, the Terraphiles, and join them in their competition to win the Arrow of Law, an artifact that may be the key to saving the multiverse. But what does the Arrow of Law have to do with the notorious space pirate Captain Cornelius or the theft of Mrs. Banning-Cannon's hideous new gargantuan hat?

On the surface, this looks like slam dunk for me. Michael Moorcock, author of The Dancers at the End of Time - Good. Doctor Who - Good. A strong P.G. Wodehouse feel remniscent of The Code of the Woosters - Good. Too bad it wasn't.

The ingredients are all there. At the core, this feels like a P.G. Wodehouse book set in space. Bingo Lockesley is a lot like Bertie Wooster and Mr. Banning Cannon could easily be someone that puts Bertie up to a hare-brained scheme. Moorcock even writes this more like a Wodehouse book than his normal style. It's very remniscent of Dancers at the End of Time in that respect.

The Arrow of Law is a lot like the maguffin in many of Moorcock's Eternal Champion books and the Cosmic Balance winds up playing a big part. Captain Cornelius is likely an aspect of the Eternal Champion and one of the more interesting characters in the book. I like what Moorcock's done with the 500th century and its denizens. However...

My main reason for 3-ing the heck out of this is the lack of The Doctor and Amy Pond. The Doctor and Amy are barely in it and don't do a whole lot. It reads like Moorcock had a Wodehousian novel set in the future already written and just crossed out two of the character's names and changed them to The Doctor and Amy Pond. As a Michael Moorcock book, I'd give this a high three. As Doctor Who book, it's barely a two.
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