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146 of 153 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars PAUL McGANN'S TV MOVIE FOR NORTH AMERICA!!!
Well, as Amazon does not give us the info on what we need to know about this wonderful Doctor Who DVD. I have posted the info here from the know all, and see all on Doctor Who DVD's. Here is Steve Manfred's info on Doctor Who - The Movie - Special Edition.
LINK: [...]
Over 14 years after its production and broadcast, the Doctor Who TV Movie starring Paul McGann...
Published on November 8, 2010 by Phil Benfield

versus
113 of 119 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Weak, but certainly not McGann's or Segal's fault
As "Dark Angel" and "Firefly" fans well know, the talking heads at the FOX network have an uncanny knack for truly sticking it to the science fiction community and this mismash of eleventh-hour script rewrites is no exception. It's a glorious "What-Could-Have-Been" storyline that is brilliant in its first half, falls into incomprehensible mush for the second half, then...
Published on March 21, 2006 by Amazon Customer


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146 of 153 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars PAUL McGANN'S TV MOVIE FOR NORTH AMERICA!!!, November 8, 2010
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Movie (Special Edition) (DVD)
Well, as Amazon does not give us the info on what we need to know about this wonderful Doctor Who DVD. I have posted the info here from the know all, and see all on Doctor Who DVD's. Here is Steve Manfred's info on Doctor Who - The Movie - Special Edition.
LINK: [...]
Over 14 years after its production and broadcast, the Doctor Who TV Movie starring Paul McGann as the Eighth Doctor will finally see release in North America!!!

This 2-disc release will be on Tuesday, February 8th, 2011 for the suggested retail price of $34.98, under the title: Doctor Who - The Movie - Special Edition. 2entertain's Commissioning Editor Dan Hall revealed this surprise news on the "Hoo on Who" podcast (available on iTunes) on August 25. He was successful in negotiating release rights for this production outside of the UK that had previously been held by the co-producers of the TV Movie, Universal Television. This clears the way for a release in North America by BBC Worldwide Americas.

The version that will see release is a new edition that was made available in the UK in October as part of what they're calling the Revisitations Box Set, where three previously available titles were re-released together with boosted extra features. The McGann TV Movie is one of them. The others will see release in North America later in 2011.

For those of you who don't know, "the TV Movie" as it is called was a one-off attempt to revive Doctor Who in 1996 as a "back door pilot" for the Fox Network in the U.S. It was a co-production by Universal Television, BBC Worldwide Americas, and Fox.

In it, we see the Seventh Doctor regenerate into the Eighth, and embark on an adventure to save the Earth from being destroyed by the TARDIS after the Master opens its power source, on the eve of the new millennium. Ratings on Fox were not strong enough to warrant a series, and nothing else happened with the TV rights until 2005, although the McGann Eighth Doctor continued on in the spinoff fiction of original novels, audio dramas, and comic strips, all of which will be highlighted in the extra features on the upcoming DVD:

Disc 1

· 86 minute movie with stereo audio.

· Commentary 1 (2001) - original DVD release solo commentary by director Geoffrey Sax.

· Commentary 2 (2009) - new commentary with actors Paul McGann and Sylvester McCoy, moderated by Nicholas Briggs.

· The Seven Year Hitch (dur. 53' 53") - This documentary looks at executive producer Philip Segal's seven-year quest to return Doctor Who to the screen, from his initial contact with the BBC shortly before its cancellation in 1989, through to the production and transmission of the movie in 1996. Featuring Philip Segal, BBC executive producer Jo Wright, BBC Head of Series Peter Cregeen, BBC1 controller Alan Yentob, writer Matthew Jacobs and Graeme Harper, the director of BBC Enterprises' abandoned Doctor Who movie. Narrated by Amanda Drew.

· The Doctor's Strange Love (dur. 17' 10") - writers Joe Lidster and Simon Guerrier discuss how they stopped worrying and learned to love the TV Movie with comedian Josie Long.

· Photo Gallery (dur.3' 46") - a selection of design and production photographs from the story.

· Isolated Music - option to view the movie with isolated music score.

· Music Tracks - four music tracks from the production presented in full: `In a Dream', `All Dressed Up', `Ride into the Moonlight' and `Auld Lang Syne'.

· Coming Soon (dur. approx 1' 00") - a trail for a forthcoming DVD release.

· PDF material - Radio Times listings in PDF format.

· Programme Subtitles

· Subtitle Production Notes

Disc 2 (DVD9)

· Pre-Production:

· Paul McGann Audition (dur. 7' 38") - Paul McGann's audition for the role.

· VFX Tests June 1994 (dur. 0' 50") - early video effects tests by Amblin Imaging in 1994, featuring the `Spider Dalek' design.

· VFX March 1996 (dur. 2' 32") - video effects build-ups presented as mute timecoded `work in progress' shots from the CGI effects department.

· Production:

· EPK (dur. 15' 36") - the Electronic Press Kit put out by Fox in 1996 included a short documentary and interview segments to allow other broadcasters to put together their own packages about the movie.

· Behind the Scenes (dur. 4' 47") - on set and on location during the filming of the movie.

· Philip Segal's Tour of the TARDIS Set (dur. 2'33") - executive producer Philip Segal shows us around the TARDIS control room set.

· Alternate Takes (dur. 1' 02") - two alternate versions of scenes from the movie.

· BBC Trails (dur. 1' 00") - BBC television trails for the movie.

· Who Peter 1989-2009 (dur. 26' 42") - since the birth of Doctor Who in the sixties, it has shared an almost symbiotic relationship with the long-running BBC children's magazine show `Blue Peter'. In the second part of this special documentary series, some of those involved look back over the history of that relationship in the `new series years'. With new series executive producer Russell T. Davies, Blue Peter editor Richard Marson, brand executive Edward Russell, writers Robert Shearman and Clayton Hickman and competition winners William Grantham and John Bell. Presented by Gethin Jones.

· The Wilderness Years (dur. 23' 29") - in the seven years between the end of the classic series and the broadcast of the TVM, Doctor Who survived in print, video and audio, kept alive by fans within those industries who were determined not to let it die. With BBC head of serials Peter Cregeen, former Doctor Who Magazine editor John Freeman and current editor Tom Spilsbury., Virgin Books editor Peter Darvill-Evans, BBC Books consultant Justin Richards, script editor Andrew Cartmel, video producers Keith Barnfather and Bill Baggs, director Kevin Davies and Big Finish producer Jason Haigh-Ellery. Narrated by Glen Allen.

· Stripped for Action - The Eighth Doctor (dur. 19' 45") - the final part of the series looking at the Doctor's adventures in comic-strip form. With writers Scott Gray, former Doctor Who Magazine editors Gary Russell, Alan Barnes and Clayton Hickman, artists Lee Sullivan, Martin Geraghty and Roger Langridge, author Paul Scoones, historian Jeremy Bentham.

· Tomorrow's Times - The Eighth Doctor (dur. 10' 47") another in the series looking at Doctor Who's contemporary coverage in daily newspapers and other publications. Presented by Nicholas Courtney.
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113 of 119 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Weak, but certainly not McGann's or Segal's fault, March 21, 2006
By 
Amazon Customer (Not near Washington, DC) - See all my reviews
As "Dark Angel" and "Firefly" fans well know, the talking heads at the FOX network have an uncanny knack for truly sticking it to the science fiction community and this mismash of eleventh-hour script rewrites is no exception. It's a glorious "What-Could-Have-Been" storyline that is brilliant in its first half, falls into incomprehensible mush for the second half, then rushes to an admittedly-satisfying ending. Visually it borrows heavily from elements of "X-Files" and "E.R.," up to and including the hospital-oriented dramatics, with a recurring theme of advancing clock hands/digital clock displays. The storyline might best be described as a fusion of Pertwee's "Spearhead From Space" and Tom Baker's "The Deadly Assassin" set in present-day San Fransisco.

First off: Paul McGann is brilliant. He adheres to the cardinal rule of "reinvent the Doctor the way YOU think he should be played" that has worked so well for every actor before him, and we get a charming, easily-distracted romantic with a hypnotic gaze. Eric Roberts likewise brings a great combination of sadism and quirky humour to the Master. Sylvester McCoy is back on form as the Doctor's seventh incarnation as if he never left, and Daphne Ashbrook manages to steal scenes even when the script has relegated her to the familiar "stand to the side and ask 'What's it all about, Doctor?'" routine. Mention should also be made of Yee Jee Tso's very good performance as the wayward teenager who becomes an unwitting pawn in the Master's plan to regain his physical Time Lord existence.

The TARDIS interior is unbelievable. You get the impression that this is what the series's original designers would have aimed for all along had they the budget. This TARDIS is truly a living entity, with its own personality traits and an architecture that combines Victorian decor with a Gothic cathedral and then dresses it all up in a Jules Verne wrapping. Many fundamental premises from the original series are preserved, including the TARDIS key, the contents of the TARDIS's tool kit and even the familiar materialization and "cloister bell" sound effects. Other passing cues include jelly babies, a weirdly long scarf, squawking Daleks in the background, and a "500 Year Diary."

What the fans haven't been able to accept are the out-of-nowhere plot changes that conflict with many established premises, of the type that seem to have been added to the script for the benefit of new audiences. Why would the Time Lords construct a time machine who's power source can only be opened by the retinal scan of an alien (human)? A motorcycle/ambulance chase scene does nothing to advance the plot, although the Doctor's interactions with secondary characters are at times touching, at times hilarious. There is also an over-reliance on CGI visual effects that, while dazzling to look at, don't really add to the story and end up looking pretty out-of-place (hey, this IS the series famous for its wobbly sets and lurching green bubble-wrap monsters). I need to also work in some praise here for John Debney and Louis Febre's beautifully composed orchestral soundtrack: there are a number of moments where the music carries the story --certainly a long way from Dudley Simpson's dull clarinet fanfares or Keff McCulloch's over-synthesized chase scenes.

Like it or hate it, this episode IS the only visual representation of the Doctor in his eighth incarnation (McGann would go on to broaden the role in audio adventures), and while it has been accepted as canon by the fan community, the acceptance is a bit grudging. Nevertheless there are enough definitive "that IS the Doctor" moments to offset the weak second-half script, good DOES triumph over evil at the last instant, and of course we all know... the Master WILL be back.
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54 of 58 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One word of caution..., November 17, 2010
By 
Matt MN (St. Paul, MN) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Movie (Special Edition) (DVD)
Like everyone else, I'm ecstatic that this title is finally getting an official North American DVD release. One word of caution, however - the Doctor Who Restoration Team has confirmed that the main feature on the DVD was taken from the PAL master, not the NTSC master.

What does that mean for US/Canada audiences? As the TV movie was originally shot and broadcast in North American using the NTSC standard, that means that this conversion is NTSC -> PAL -> and back to NTSC. The feature presentation will suffer from PAL-speed up, running about 4% faster than originally broadcast on Fox back in 1996. Perceptive viewers (who may have recorded this on VHS when it originally aired) will notice that everyone's voice is pitched slightly higher and that the movie runs faster (looking similar to how "time-compressed" airings of shows look on basic cable syndication).

Most American viewers probably won't even notice the changes but they are there nonetheless and the more perceptive (or pedantic) fans will notice. Still, with that said, the extras package looks great and I can forgive the PAL speed up (I'm used to it by now, having imported the Region 2 DVD release years ago).
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Flawed but fun movie; great DVD, February 11, 2011
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Movie (Special Edition) (DVD)
This made-for-TV movie is a strange beast; the only episode of Doctor Who to be co-produced by Americans, it attempted (and failed) to relaunch the series for a multinational audience in 1996. Thus, many Doctor Who fans regard this movie as a weird aberration - America's lone, tacky contribution to the Doctor Who mythos, sandwiched uncomfortably between the original and relaunched British versions.

I don't quite share that negative view of this movie, however. As an American myself, I've always wanted to see Doctor Who take off in the U.S. - and this movie remains Who's only truly significant foray into the U.S. market. Such concerns aside, I also admire the movie for its slick production values and sense of fun. To me, this is still the best-looking Doctor Who production of all time, particularly in terms of sets (huge), extras (numerous), and direction (arty-farty).

Certainly, Matthew Jacobs' often-convoluted script needed some work; if you compare it to "Caves of Androzani" or "Midnight," you're bound to be disappointed. But I'd still rather watch this movie than, say, anything involving the Quarks or the Slitheen - if only for Paul McGann's charismatic performance as the Eighth Doctor, and his awesome TARDIS interior.

But even for fans who hate the Doctor Who TV Movie, there should be no denying that this is a first-rate DVD package. The remastered movie itself looks and sounds great (why no Blu-ray version, I wonder?) But the real attraction is the huge array of special features. The longest is a documentary called "The Seven Year Hitch" about the movie's epic production history; though a little dry, it offers some compelling glimpses into the workings (and thought processes) of the BBC.

Another standout feature (not listed on the back of the DVD, oddly enough) is Paul McGann's audition tapes; these are particularly interesting, because he reads from a totally different script from the one ultimately used for the movie. Other cool features include: special effects tests for CGI Daleks; a featurette on press coverage for the TV Movie; another featurette on how interest in post-cancellation Doctor Who was sustained by books, comics, and fan videos; and a fun roundtable discussion in which three nerdy fans talk about what they like (and dislike) in the movie.

Overall, this is easily one of the best Doctor Who DVD releases, putting many Hollywood releases to shame; so even if you're lukewarm or hostile toward the movie itself, I'd consider picking it up.
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19 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Finally!, January 13, 2009
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Due to complex copywrite issues, this film has never been released in the U.S. since its 1996 television premiere...until now! Finally, a DVD is going to be released in 2011. It has only been aired once in the U.S. and never been shown again nor has it ever been released on home video in the states before now. It is the only on-screen appearance of Eighth Doctor Paul McGann, and the only Dr. Who ever produced by an American company.

Now the story does have its problems, and doesn't quite deserve five stars, but it's still a great adventure that deserved to be released long before now which is why I'm giving this DVD release five stars. Some of the problems include some continuity errors in the story and some unanswered questions. But over all, it does have a great action-packed story with some great directing and performances. I still found it to be highly enjoyable.

The Plot:

The Master is executed on the Dalek planet Skaro. His last request was for his arhenemy, the Doctor, to take his remains back to their home planet of Gallifrey. As the Doctor put it "It was a request they should never have granted."

The Seventh Doctor Sylvester McCoy is on his way to Gallifrey with the Master's remains. But the Master has managed to somewhat regenerate into an oozing snake-like creature and sabotages the TARDIS, causing it to make an emergency landing on Earth in the year 1999.

Upon arrival, the Doctor gets caught in the crossfire of a gang shoot-out and gets shot forcing him to regenerate into Eighth Doctor Paul McGann. The Master has taken over the body of an ambulance driver played by Eric Roberts. But the body won't last long. With a quickly disintergrating body, the Master intends to take over the Doctor's body by opening and using the TARDIS's power source, the Eye of Harmony. But with the Eye opened, it threatens to suck the Earth through it. Now the Doctor and new companion Dr. Grace Holloway must race against time to save the planet.

Highly recommended!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It took 14 years, October 16, 2012
By 
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Movie (Special Edition) (DVD)
This made-for-TV movie has been shown only once in the US in 1996. Back then, I watched it in a hotel room while traveling and couldn't tape it. Eventually I gave up hope that it would ever be released on DVD or VHS in the US and bought a PAL copy (from amazon.co.uk) to play on my "hacked" DVD player. Murphy's Law being what it is, about a year later the US release finally came. Accordingly, I haven't really gotten around to watching the US release until now.

As another reviewer pointed out, this is a NTSC-to-PAL-back-to-NTSC copy, so there is a bit of a speed-up that happens when NTSC is transferred to PAL. You'll get used to that. The US-release DVD has a lot of extras (more than a disc worth) that aren't on the UK-release DVD. They're generally quite good.

I thought that Paul McGann was an excellent Doctor, even though he was stuck with a rather poor script. The supporting cast is strong, especially Yee Jee Tso playing a young gangster who reforms when the Master turns out to be more evil than even a gangster can stand. The production was classy for a TV movie of that era.

Then there's that script. I quite agree that it was wrong to make the Doctor half human, and that there's too much time wasted on chases for an 85 minute film. The opening voice-over tells us that the Daleks, having tried and executed the Master on Skaro, granted his last wish and gave his remains to the Doctor to be returned to Gallifrey. Give me a break!! Firstly, the Daleks don't bother with trials. Secondly, they don't grant last wishes. And thirdly, if the Doctor came within range of Daleks they would shout "EXTERMINATE!" Furthermore, one would think that a movie about time would have gotten the date of the millennium straight. (OK, I know half the world's population thinks it started on January 1, 2000, but it didn't really start till January 1, 2001.) Watching the film again 14 years after its original airing, I thank all the powers of the universe that the BBC found Russell T. Davies. He showed us what a good script should be.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Much maligned attempt to reboot Doctor Who entertaining primarily due to McGann's performance, May 7, 2011
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Movie (Special Edition) (DVD)
A cat has nine lives. Luckily for fans of Doctor Who, the time traveler many more. "Doctor Who: The Movie" was an attempt to revive the BBC TV franchise for both American and British audiences after the series run out of steam in the 1980's. While flawed with a script that tries to do too much (be a pilot for those who don't know the series, Americanize the story/character a bit and craft an entertaining TV movies that long time fans could also enjoy)and features enough plot holes for the Tardis to fly through, "Doctor Who: The Movie" succeeds because of the charming performance of Paul McGann. It's too bad this pilot didn't get picked up because McGann is marvelous (although he has quite a bit different interpretation compared to his predecessors)in the role and I have the feeling the series would have improved.

While transporting the remains of his nemesis The Master, the Doctor (Sylvester McCoy) crashes his sabotaged Tardis in San Francisco in 1999. Shot as he leaves the Tardis, The Doctor ends up in the hospital where Dr. Grace Holloway (Daphne Ashbrook)tries to save his life causing the Doctor to regenerate (Paul McGann). The Master takes over the body of a paramedic (Eric Roberts)with a new goal--to take the Doctor's body because that's the only way he can survive.

Watch for a very clever reference to Tom Baker's Doctor.

While not the best Doctor Who movie I've seen, it's far from the worst and a marketed improvement over some of the ones that aired when Sylvester McCoy or Colin Baker "inhabited" the role in the 1980's. That said, you'll either like the film and be willing to over look the flawed script by Matthew Vaughn ("The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones", "The Emperor's New Groove)the direction is fairly solid by Geoffrey Sax ("White Noise")keeping the story moving along at a nice pace. The main flaw here is that the Doctor who does quite a bit of detecting in the show does little here primarily running around.

The digital visual effects look dated but otherwise the production values (particularly for the redesigned interior of the Tardis)look quite nice (the TV film had a budget of $5 million MUCH bigger than anything the original series ever had).

The DVD transfer looks good although it comes with some problems; the darker scenes tend to bury detail in murkiness but colors look quite good. It's a pity we don't have a Blu-ray transfer of this but, I suspect, this was probably assembled on video. It would require a complete rescan/reassembly of the original film elements for the film to truly benefit from a high def transfer.

Audio sounds terrific with a nice, robust stereo mix.

The special features will wow most fans. We get visual effects reels produced prior to production; we also get a featurette "The Seven Year Hitch" (titled because of the seven year hiatus until the TV movie)with producer Phillip Seagal detailing his efforts to "regenerate" The Doctor.

"The Doctor's Strange Love" focuses on how the TV movie has caught on with some members of the Who audience. "The Wilderness Years" details the books written that kept the character of The Doctor alive while the show was on hiatus for a decade. We also get "Tomorrow's Times" which focuses on the press coverage when McGann was announced as the new Doctor.

Two commentary tracks one with the director (which has long periods of silence)and one featuring actors McCoy and McGann are both interesting--the latter is quite lively. Nicholas Briggs moderates the discussion and trio play well of each other.

Although "Doctor Who: The Movie" isn't perfect it IS entertaining and features a charismatic performance by McGann (who really should have been considered for another chance to play the Doctor or at least a cameo in the rebooted series for a regeneration sequence).

I'd suggest Whovians give it a chance. Is it a great TV movie? No but it IS entertaining and even in its cheesy moments it's fun.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars McGann & McCoy Great, February 22, 2011
By 
FYI (Rocky Mountain West) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Movie (Special Edition) (DVD)
Paul McGann's Doctor Who is a wonderful surprise. He embodies pathos, humor, and intelligence, much like Jon Pertwee and David Tennant. Where could this have gone? If only the TARDIS had been liberated to land all over the world - not just the U.K. or USA, but Canada, Hong Kong, Australia, New Zealand, etc. Thank you to Philip David Segal for the stubborn persistence in getting this thing made after the ten year ruination under the infamous John Nathan-Turner, that demented question-mark celery laden pox on Who.

Problems: The half-human issue. The Spielberg Strings. The Dirty Nerds in "Strange Love." Co-Producer Jo Wright attacks on Sylvester McCoy, who in fact did a great job! It's in poor taste, and a case of BBC "smoke and mirrors," to attack Sly McCoy and his Doctor Who. The show's low ratings prior to cancellation were the result of the horrible disco/cutesy nonsense of John Nathan-Turner and his crew of BBC sanctioned Doctor Destroyers. Even the marvelous Radiophonic Workshop ruined the music under JNT's direction. What a shame. Back to this TV movie: The silly motorcycle chases. The unsubtle romance stuff. The repeated New Year's countdown. The female Doc's wardrobe. Eric Roberts' camp. The snake spit.

BUT the pluses outweigh these issues, especially Paul McGann's and Sylvester McCoy's acting. The surgery. The horror (though I don't have two hearts, I've woken up during surgery - well depicted). The regeneration scene is priceless. The humor and pathos. The Frankenstein movie. The interior of the TARDIS is FANTASTIC. Segal gets what the TARDIS is about. Infinite. Cozy. Cool. The Doctors (McCoy, McGann) both indulge in Jelly Babies, H.G. Wells, and vintage jazz. What might have been . . .

Note: Paul McGann is also excellent, with his brothers, in the superb The Hanging Gale.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Too bad it didn't take off..., March 10, 2007
I have a region 2 DVD player so I have this movie at home. It is not bad, though some parts of it may have fans scratching their heads. (eg The Doctor is half human??)

I found Eric Roberts as The Master very entertaining. I did not care for the portrayal of the Daleks. They made it seem like they were justified in condeming The Master to death, when they thenselves are practically space nazis.

Paul McGann did a good portrayal of The Doctor and is probably the best looking one to play the role as well. Dr Grace was a decent companion, and I liked the brief romantic interlude between them.

This movie probably would have done better if it was geared more towards actual Who fans. I know they were trying to get a new audience with it in the US, but it obviously didn't work out.

Paul McGann has done some great Who stories with Big Finish Audio that are worth checking out.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth seeing. Really., October 18, 2007
By 
Gip Plaster (near Fort Worth, Texas USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The Doctor Who TV movie, a British-American joint venture aimed at potentially launching a new TV series, is routinely slammed among Doctor Who fans as nasty and aborted chapter in Doctor Who history best locked away and forgotten.

But it's not that bad.

Paul McGann's Doctor is funny, quirky and intense - perfect to follow Sylvester McCoy's reign as the Time Lord. In fact, McCoy gets the first twenty minutes of the film to himself before the Frankenstein-themed regeneration sequence. The Seventh Doctor's final appearance is a strong performance and perhaps the best part of the movie.

Once McGann settles in, the plot gets murky and takes turns most Who purists wish it had not. The fact that McGann's Doctor is half human is an integral part of the plot and can't be swept under the carpet as easily as some fan would like. The effort even features an American-style car chase, of course. The Eighth Doctor's performance, however, is solid throughout.

The TARDIS stars in this story alongside The Doctor, Grace, Lee and The Master. Even when poor camera work in some of the TARDIS scenes makes the mostly adequate special effects look like spray-painted Styrofoam and flashing lights, the time machine looks grander than ever. Even the high-tech TARDIS of the new series pales beside this one. The old girl has class.

While Yee Jee Tso's performance as Lee is wooden and amateurish, he does not have enough dialog to do much serious damage to the production. Eric Roberts first does a nice impression of the previous Master's voice, but after a line about getting used to his new body, Roberts' own mannerisms turn a menacing foe into something that eventually becomes like a perturbed Liberace.

The plot wraps up with convoluted convenience, but the story ultimately does not leave a bad taste in the mouth. It's a good effort and worth seeing. Just don't watch too closely.
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Doctor Who: The Movie (Special Edition)
Doctor Who: The Movie (Special Edition) by Geoffrey Sax (DVD - 2011)
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