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The Doctrine of Humanity (Contours of Christian Theology) Paperback – January 23, 1997


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Product Details

  • Series: Contours of Christian Theology
  • Paperback: 303 pages
  • Publisher: IVP Academic (January 23, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 083081535X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830815357
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #103,886 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This series has been around for over a decade now and has established itself as providing learned yet accessible treatments of key topics in systematic theology. The authors are not only fine theological thinkers, they are also passionate churchmen with a love for God's people and a desire to see the church grow in her knowledge of grace. Each volume blends exegesis, theological synthesis and judicious dialogue with the history of theology to provide an excellent treatment of the chosen topic. Highly recommended for thoughtful Christians who want to deepen their knowledge of Christian theology." (Carl R. Trueman, Paul Woolley Professor of Church History, Westminster Theological Seminary)

"Read everything in the IVP Contours of Theology series. Pure gold." (Kevin DeYoung, senior pastor at University Reformed Church in East Lansing, Michigan)

"Often insightful . . . a helpful complement to other treatments of anthropology." (Bibliotheca Sacra)

About the Author

Charles Sherlock, an Australian theologian, is Executive Officer of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Theological Schools, Executive Officer for the Board of Ministry of the Anglican Diocese of Bendigo and Regional Coordinator (Oceania) for the Anglican Communion's "Bible in the Life of the Church" project. He has also written The God Who Fights: The War Tradition in Holy Scripture (Edwin Mellen).

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Brett M. Sweet on December 21, 2009
Format: Paperback
Well, let's see. I originally picked up this book with fascination that a book written after Hoekema's Created in God's Image (One of my all time favorites!) could write a book on Biblical anthropology and not reference Hoekema once in the end notes. And in comparison, this certainly is not nearly as good as Hoekema. With that being said, Sherlock makes some excellent observations on culture and the way we should think about people made in the image of God. He is outstanding in the issue of constantly addressing the effect of sin on mankind- it is our greatest problem, and he is right to spend time on that. He critiques some outside viewpoints well including Marxism, and also critiques prevailing Evangelical problems like excessive individualism and a lack of tithing. The weaknesses are several however. First and foremost, although he seems clear on sin and person of Christ, he never engages on how the gospel is applied to us. Is it by faith and repentance? He references them, but leaves no clarity on whether we must trust Christ to be saved. One could be Barthian (Neo-Orthodox views of Universalism) and read this book and come away without Jesus claims to exclusivity. I understand that this isn't on soteriology but the gospel must be proclaimed in some measure- this is of first importance (I Cor. 15). Second, his egalitarian views of men's and women's roles is an axe that he grinds on at every available chance. While being sensitive to my brothers and sisters who disagree, political correctness when applied to Scripture has never historically ended well and tends to arrive in liberalism. My suggestion: read Hoekema first, it's more in depth theologically but still easy to understand. Read Piper and Grudem on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood, and then read this book with a discerning eye and keep the good observations that Dr. Sherlock makes.
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By D. Bartol on December 26, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book for a class a while back and it was a huge disappointment. While Sherlock makes some decent points here and there, it just seemed like he was using this book to push his own egalitarian position on gender roles, and it shows itself in the most awkward locations. The thing that gave me the biggest cringe was not so much his secondary theological preferences, but his obnoxious push for communism, even though he did not take the full step of endorsement. I wish I could offer quotes here, but I had already thrown it away. There are far better books on Biblical anthropology out there (see "Created in God's image" by Anthony Hoekema) and I cannot recommend this to anyone.
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9 of 14 people found the following review helpful By MikeCabe on October 20, 2010
Format: Paperback
It is baffling how out of place this book is in this series of otherwise excellent, solid books, not unlike the book on revelation in Berkouwers "Studies in Theology". While not claiming that this book is without some value, and I appreciate his choice of topics, his almost complete failure to discuss sin, human depravity, and the freedom/bondage of the will as specific topics makes this volume no little dissapointment. In light of both the historic importance of the doctrine and the extravigant expressions of depravity and sin in the the last 100 years, it is hard to take this book too seriously when it fails to look at the center of these issues: the human heart. Another complaint is the failure of the author to take a stand for the Biblical priciples regarding the roles of men and women in the family and church (not surprising since, as the preface mentions, his wife is also and ordained minister in the Anglican chucrh). Sadly, it is ALMOST appropriate to retitle this book "The Doctrine of Humanism."
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Spark a love for theology of humanity! Could do without the theology of the menstrual cycle, but the rest of it was wonderful!
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