Does Education Matter?: Myths About Education and Economi... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Does Education Matter?: Myths About Education and Economic Growth (Penguin Business) Paperback – November 25, 2003


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$86.80 $2.36



Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Teacher Supplies
Browse our Teacher Supplies store, with everything teachers need to educate students and expand their learning.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 18 and up
  • Grade Level: 12 and up
  • Series: Penguin Business
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Global (November 25, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140286608
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140286601
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 4.9 x 7.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,658,569 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Alison Wolf is Chair of Education at the Institute of Education in London and Programme Director at the Centre for the Economics of Education. She lives in Dulwich, London.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By George C. Leef on July 25, 2006
Format: Paperback
The conventional wisdom about higher education goes like this. It is imperative for government to get more and more students into and through college because we are now in a "knowledge economy" and unless we have enough highly skilled workers, we will fall behind. Almost no one in politics or the education establishment ever questions those beliefs. It is widely accepted that increasing the amount of formal education is the means by which states or nations that are relatively poor can lift themselves up economically.

Professor Alison Wolf of King's College in London challenges the conventional wisdom in this extraordinarily insightful book. Actually, it's more than a challenge -- it's a thorough refutation. She demonstrates that the "knowledge economy" does not significantly change the broad contours of the labor force, that a high public "investment" in formal higher education is neither necessary nor sufficient for strong economic growth; and that the best educational policy to follow would be to ensure that young students learn well the academic basics (which many now don't, even if they graduate from college).

Does Education Matter? is absolutely essential reading for anyone with an interest in educational policy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By algo41 on October 19, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wolf makes a convincing case that if the goal is economic growth the United Kingdom (UK) in the 1990's, and arguably the US currently, is spending too much as a society on higher education. An underlying misconception is that because better educated people make more money, society will necessarily get richer if it has more educated people. The fallacy is that education is increasingly used to screen hires, so that people are more educated than necessary for the jobs they are doing. While occupational structure changed in the UK in favor of "managerial/professional/technical", going from 29% to 37% in the UK from 1984 to 1998, craft and related dropped 5.5% (p.49). It could still be argued that the occupational trends will continue and accelerate, and that education impacts these trends in the face of international competition, but there is no evidence that happened in the UK. Moreover, looking at the successful countries provides no support: Switzerland had relatively lower proportions of higher education; World Bank analyses referenced in this book found that the countries which had done the most to increase education levels on average grew less fast than those which devoted less resources (p. 39). Again, like studies in other areas such as nutrition, it is hard to separate out factors and come to definitive conclusions. Certainly, specific examples can be found in the US where there are skill gaps, and joint programs between community colleges and industry have worked very well, but that does not invalidate Wolf's general thesis.

Another theme of the book is that centrally directed educational policies, especially if aimed at promoting equality, failed in the UK and are likely to fail elsewhere.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The author, Alison Wolf, concentrates her analysis on post-secondary (referred to as "high school" in the U.S.) education and specifically on the popular and all too widely held view that among politicians, businessmen and the public at large, that an expansion in post-secondary school education (both university and technical) contributes directly to economic growth. The book specifically examines this issue in the United Kingdom but the analysis itself carries over well into the U.S. and other developed nations. The author herself, a PhD with research specialization in the education field and one of the United Kingdom's leading authorities on education, is eminently qualified on the topic.

The author starts out by providing a history of post-secondary school education. In that history she is careful to emphasize that the connection between higher education and economic grouch has only come about since the late 1800s and even then has not been a paramount factor in the expansion of post-secondary education until the second half (and particularly towards the end) of the 20th century. Before that education, at that level, was intended to benefit society and the state primarily through the production of civil servants and the intelligentsia, a fact that is difficult to comprehend today.

In the remainder of the book, Wolf specifically debunks the myth that an expansion in higher education will necessarily and logically lead to higher economic growth. She does this (at the University level) by showing that that educational expansion has led to expanded educational requirements for positions over time (i.e.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Overall, good read. However, the author perhaps take son too many issues and does not tie up the loose ends on any.

A key issue that she is correct about: education follows growth; growth does not follow more education! Do not send more students to college believing that it will help America be more competitive, it will not.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search