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Why Red Doesn't Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the feel of consciousness Hardcover – June 24, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-0199775224 ISBN-10: 0199775222 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (June 24, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199775222
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199775224
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 0.9 x 6.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #606,511 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

For readers of Perception, O'Regan's Why Red Doesn't Sound Like a Bell provides for a well-argued criticism of and a strong alternative to deterministic perspectives on perception and its role in consciousness. Perception

About the Author


Kevin O'Regan is director of one of France's most influential experimental psychology laboratories. He is most cited today as the originator of the sensorimotor approach to consciousness. He is also one of the discovers of the much discussed phenomenon of "change blindness", and well known for his work on eye movements in reading.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Bob Blum on July 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Nothing could be more scientifically fundamental than our own consciousness.
Everything we experience and know passes through that window.

Here is a book that squarely tackles the problem head-on,
and it is written by a well-known, widely respected director
of a major center of neuropsychological research in Paris.

I myself have been fascinated by this topic since my undergraduate days
fifty years ago and have returned to studying it full-time at Stanford,
following careers in AI and in clinical medicine.

I was plodding through a detailed paper on the ventral and dorsal
visual pathways by O'Regan's co-director Andrei Gorea, when I discovered
this popular work and rushed to read it. Now, having spent days with it
and with the author's online publications, I will comment
on both the book and the theory it propounds.

I'm always astounded when a book like this attracts so few commentators.
What's going on?

One obvious detail is that the book is overpriced.
I attribute that to Oxford University Press's unfamiliarity with
the world of online publishing a la Kindle.
OK, academic libraries will buy a copy
no matter what the price, but ordinary mortals won't.
Until a few week ago, the hardcopy cost 45 bucks
that's about 25 cents a page - yes, it's packed with valuable,
fat memes but they're in a skinny volume.
I resorted to biking onto campus to read in situ Stanford's only copy.
There are none in dozens of local public libraries. At minimum,
the Kindle price needs to be dropped substantially.
Read more ›
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Format: Hardcover
A year ago, I had the privilege to attend a lecture by J. Kevin O’Regan, ex-director of the Laboratoire de Psychologie de la Perception at the Université René Descartes, Paris 5. In his book, Why Red doesn’t sound like a bell, J. Kevin O’Regan writes about consciousness and feel in a new way.
Full review of the first part, the feel of seeing, here: http://ouzepo.wordpress.com/2014/08/31/mantis-shrimps-and-mudsplashes-the-feel-of-seeing/
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By DesertRat on December 1, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
O'Regan is a good writer. If you want to learn more about consciousness, especially the part applying to the senses, this would be a good book to get.
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