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Dogbert's Top Secret Management Handbook Paperback – October 21, 1997


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Frequently Bought Together

Dogbert's Top Secret Management Handbook + The Dilbert Principle: A Cubicle's-Eye View of Bosses, Meetings, Management Fads & Other Workplace Afflictions + Dilbert and the Way of the Weasel: A Guide to Outwitting Your Boss, Your Coworkers, and the Other Pants-Wearing Ferrets in Your Life
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: HarperBusiness; 1St Edition edition (October 21, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0887308813
  • ISBN-13: 978-0887308819
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 0.5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #166,899 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Cartoonist Scott Adams gives us still more corporate belly laughs with a point in Dogbert's Management Secrets Revealed, the 10th book based on his wildly popular Dilbert comic strip. Taken this time directly from the word processor of world-class consultant Dogbert, it focuses on critical management responsibilities like keeping up with fads, implementing pointless reorganizations and demanding status reports. "Leadership isn't something you're born with," it declares. "It's something you learn by reading Dogbert books." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Nipping at the heels of the number-one best-seller, The Dilbert Principle , lampoonist Adams' new book is another collection of managerial wisdom and Dilbert cartoon strips. This time, Adams lets loose Dogbert, a caricature of the management guru types responsible for turning those in charge into "fully functioning, paradigm-spewing management zombies." Dogbert offers secrets on how to act like a manager, motivate employees, communicate, get ahead, understand compensation programs, establish staffing levels (get rid of employees), and most important, be happy as a manager. WARNING! This book should be kept hidden in your organization's loose-leaf^-bound action plan and should not be read at work unless you have a soundproof cubicle! David Rouse --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

What started as a doodle has turned Scott Adams into a superstar of the cartoon world. Dilbert debuted on the comics page in 1989 while Adams was in the tech department at Pacific Bell. Adams continued to work at Pacific Bell until he was voluntarily downsized in 1995. He has lived in the San Francisco Bay area since 1979.

Customer Reviews

Very insightful and funny.
Sparky San Diego
I began reading a selection from this book out loud to my wife, who was in another room.
Jasper T.
This book takes incompetence and micro managing to a whole new level.
Alexander Contreras

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 8, 1997
Format: Hardcover
This book is like spending 40 hours a week in hell...
which is where I used to work, as a matter of fact.
I can't believe I used to sit in my cubicle with a
headphone growing out of my ear, staring at blank
walls we were not allowed to decorate, reading
meaningless memos from our last "Quality Driven
Leadership" meeting and wondering how my brainless
boss could somehow manage to come up with an idea
more idiotic than the last one.

And then, to top it all off, I find out that Scott
Adams spied on me, wrote a book and
I'm not seeing a penny from the royalties! This is hell.

Seriously, if you have ever been an incompetent manager --
or have suffered at the hands of one -- this book is a
must-read. But be prepared to be horrified. It will be
the story of your corporate life...and it's NOT a pretty
tale!
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Lesley West on August 20, 2001
Format: Paperback
The true horror in this fantastically funny book is its incredible accuracy. For any one who works in a corporate environment with levels of management it reads like a horror story, all the more frightening because you know all of the characters personally.
Yes it is hysterically funny. But read it at your own peril. You will never look at your colleagues and managers in the same way.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By M. Shaffer on January 19, 2005
Format: Hardcover
As luck would have it, I was reading Dogbert's Top Secret Management Handbook when an old friend showed up at my door with a sad tale. Rich was an IT guy at a bank in Florida that had gone through five buy-outs.

"I always survived before," he said. "So, I didn't think anything of it this time."

He did not survive this one. He told me how he was doing 90% of the work. The boss was a goof-off, who played a lot of golf, and there was a pretty new hire who really did not know how to program, but she had a great smile. Rich was a good team player-filling in for her deficits and doing most of the boss's work as well. So of course, the guy doing 90% of the work was the one who got sacked.

I even surprised myself when I found myself saying, "You have got to read this book," pointing to Scott Adams' cartoon book. Yes, Scott Adams may be a cartoonist, but he is also a highly accurate chronicler of corporate culture.

Since I am not a manger, I really don't know what possessed me to read this book, which I did despite Dogbert's "WARNING-- IF YOU ARE NOT A MANAGER PUT THIS BOOK DOWN RIGHT NOW. THERE ARE THINGS YOU'RE BETTER OFF NOT KNOWING."

So as a non-manager I am what Dogbert calls "a curious little wanker." Rich, who is now thinking of starting his own company, was about to benefit by my being such a nosey parker. I told him, "Everything you are going through is in here!"

What really endeared me to this book was the use of similes, which are peppered throughout, such as:

"If you hear a new management buzzword, jump on it like a starving squirrel on the last peanut on earth."

And:

"Working in a cubicle has made my ego shrivel like a raisin on an Egyptian sidewalk.
Read more ›
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By F. Orion Pozo on August 21, 2004
Format: Hardcover
If you think you can learn management skills from a character in a newspaper comic strip, this book is not for you. On the other hand, if you read Scott Adams' Dilbert comic strip before you read the headlines of your local paper, or if you find yourself LOL at most of his cartoons, you have already committed this book to memory and don't need this review.

Dogbert's Top Secret Management Handbook is a combination of reprinted Dilbert comic strips from the first half of the 1990's and a management handbook written as if it were the work of a cartoon dog named Dogbert. The cartoons are funnier than the handbook. I gave up reading the book linearly and read the cartoons first. Then I went back and read the management handbook.

The cartoons work better because you get to see Scott Adams view of management both from the manager's point of view and also from that of the dumbfounded workers. It is this juxtaposition of manager logic and worker reality that makes the Dilbert strips so funny.

The text of the handbook is entirely one-sided. You get to see the world from the unrelenting point of view of the demented management expert. The cruel logic is there, but you, the gentle reader, are forced into the role of Dilbert facing the twisted thinking of middle management. You may laugh on the outside, but you may be crying inside. I do not recommend reading this book before spending lots of time with your own manager.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 6, 1996
Format: Hardcover
Scott Adams is a genius, as we all know. What I didn't know is that he could best himself. After reading "The Dilbert Principle" and saying "Right on!" to myself a lot, then reading this book, I find even more enjoyment in Dogbert's handbook. Dogbert is more brutally to the point without frills and direct than much of what was in "The DIlbert Principle." TDP is too serious. DTSMH is a more comfortable read.

I love the parts about motivating employees and how management continually seeks to avoid compensating employees and providing empty rewards and trying to make them appear great and sought after. How true! How long do they think a donkey will chase a cardboard carrot anyway??

My only criticism of both books is the repetition of strips within each book. I'll be the first to admit my greed in wanting as much Dilbert as possible
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