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Dogfight: How Apple and Google Went to War and Started a Revolution Hardcover – November 12, 2013


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books (November 12, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374109206
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374109202
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (114 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #91,780 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

The smartphone and tablet computer have revolutionized personal computing to such an extent that they have caused waves of disruptions across numerous industries, decimating sales of laptops and giving consumers more choices than ever to have TV, movies, and the Internet on their own terms. The PC platform wars of the 1990s between Apple and Microsoft Windows may mirror the current fight for dominance over the smartphone market between Apple’s iPhone and Google’s Android, but today the stakes are higher and the battle more personal, to the extent where the fight has become “one of the nastiest, longest, and most public business battles in a generation.” Vogelstein, a contributing editor for Wired magazine in San Francisco, dissects the boardroom meetings, technological hurdles, product unveilings, courtroom battles, backstabbing, temper tantrums, and even the effect that Steve Jobs’ illness and untimely death has had on the rapidly changing landscape of mobile computing as well as on Apple’s prospects going forward. He cuts through the technological jargon and relates a succinct and compelling story, leaving value judgments up to the reader. --David Siegfried

Review

"In Dogfight, Fred Vogelstein deploys interviews with executives and key engineers from both companies to tell a refreshing inside story. If anyone wants to see why Silicon Valley still dominates global innovation, start here." —Nature

“Loaded with fresh, never-before-reported details.” —Fortune

“Adept and well-reported . . . Colorful.” —The New Yorker

“Engaging and informative.” —The Boston Globe 

“Old-school journalism that has plenty to say about the new media and how we absorb information today.” —Kirkus Reviews


More About the Author

Fred Vogelstein is a contributing editor for Wired in San Francisco. The reporting and insight in Dogfight reflect more than two decades of experience covering business and technology in San Francisco, New York, New Haven and Los Angeles.

For Wired he has written extensively about the bruising battles among Silicon Valley's giant tech companies, reporting on Google's continuing attempts to challenge Apple's consumer cred with products like the Nexus Q or by leveraging the rising power of the Android ecosystem. The impact of Google, Apple, Amazon and Facebook on the media industry has been a continuing focus.

Before joining Wired he was on staff at Fortune, chronicling the rise of Google amid the overall resurgence of Internet revenues and start-up activity in the first part of the last decade.

Prior to joining Fortune, Vogelstein wrote for US News & World Report about such topics as the rise of music file-sharing services, the high cost of college, and the deflating of the first Internet bubble.

Vogelstein earlier worked for the Wall Street Journal and New York Newsday. His work has also appeared in The New York Times Magazine, the Washington Post, and the Los Angeles Times.

Fred is a native of New York City. He studied political science at Pomona College in Los Angeles. He pursued a year-long program at Columbia University's Graduate School of Business as a Knight-Bagehot Fellow.



Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Very interesting book and a really good read.
Robert Howell
That said, the book is worth it for the first 1/2 and it keep me reading till the very end.
Amazon Customer
A great behind the scenes look at Apple and Google.
Aldo Redaelli

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Partha on November 20, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The first part of the book deals with the product-development war between Apple and Google. Very dramatic, insightful and well-written. Apart from the dramatic work stories from the insiders at Google and Apple, it also covers a number of strategic non-trivial points, and is a very good read.
The last part opens up a general topic of 'where is the revolution headed' and describes the current relationship tension between the media companies (who provides content) and the 'internet' companies (who are increasingly providing the platform, e.g. Netflix). Typically, this part should be a book by itself, if it has to rise above what most people already know. The treatment of this topic in the book is weak, and makes for a scattered last part.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Lisa Poulson on December 10, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is the most cogent, insightful distillation of how Apple and Google have changed the world that I've seen. Not only does Vogelstein give us great juicy details about exactly what happened and how, he also points to what's coming next and why. We are in the middle of a massive reordering of how we interact, buy, and get entertained. This book is the best description of our times out there. To read this book is to see the whole landscape in a new way. It's a rare book that does this. Dogfight succeeds!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Quoc Tran on November 19, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I read this on a recent flight and highly recommend it. As someone who was at many of Apple's product launches, I'm impressed by the unofficial stories that the author was able to unearth. This is a thoughtful, deeply researched, and enjoyable book to read.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Zago on January 3, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I came to this book from the great NY Times article ([...] That article is extremely specific with great details that haven't been public about the launch of the iPhone. The book starts off strong describing the start of the iPhone and Google Android projects. Both of these topics are covered with a decent amount of detail, but it's very striking that the NY Times article has so much more detail and is written with a much more interesting writing style than the book. That's confusing because you get the feeling that the author has a great deal of material from his time at Wired and elsewhere for this book, but leaves so much out.

As the books goes on, it gets more and more general and the revolution mentioned in the title becomes a roughly-described convergence something or other. It gets so general that the push of the strong 2006-2009 Android and iPhone narrative is completely gone. It feels summary chapter after summary chapter without a strong narrative. This feels like padding and I hate to say it, but this book would of been much better served as a few essays on specific topics (just like the NY Times piece) or a much more detailed journalistic take with an avalanche of detail. I don't get the feeling that this book was extremely researched outside of existing material the author already had a little more fact checking and poking and prodding among his sources to get the book ready for print. This won't be a definitive book about the this era of technology, and that's a shame because you know that Fred has a mountain of material that is unique and exclusive to him.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Chris from Tucson on January 11, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The most complete take on the Android and iOS battle I've read so far. For the majority of the book it presents information through stories from people inside both Apple and Google. The narrative suffers when the author decides to present his own analysis. The analysis can yank you out of the interesting accounts and excellent reporting that preceded the random opinions of the author. The opinions did sway both directions , so I feel the books overall objectivity remains fair and balanced.

Interesting take on the true importance of iOS and Android in terms of convergence of media for the last couple chapters, but felt drawn out and full of conjecture. A good read if you want an overview of the origins of iOS and Android, and the disruptive force of smartphones and tablets on the tech and media industry.

Nitpicking:

The nerd in me got a little angry when he described Android's ability to run Adobes Flash Runtime as a key advantage for Android, when this feature would destroy battery life, and crash so often. So much so that eventually Android stopped supporting it for the same reason Apple never allowed it to run on iOS in the first place.

Also not enough importance is given to the fact that iOS was built as a touch screen operating system first, while Android had touchscreen functionality tacked on top of an operating system intended to be used with a physical keyboard. And how this translated to better touch performance for iOS.

Market share is focused on a little too much in this book. While the war between Apple and Microsoft in the battle of personal computing was often measured by this statistic, I feel that it paints an incomplete picture of the smartphone and tablet dominance.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By BookExplorer on December 10, 2013
Format: Hardcover
This was the most fun I've ever had reading a business book. Dogfight imparts gobs information without ever disturbing the well-paced, engaging narrative. Mr. Vogelstein puts you right in the room with the people who were creating groundbreaking products. I've never been the kind of person who loves his cell phone, but I have a whole new appreciation for what went into it. Mr. Vogelstein's distillation of the issues, battles and personalities made it easy to understand the big picture while not skimping on the gleaming, telling detail. All-in-all a thoroughly enjoyable read that I've already recommended to a gadget geek friend and another who can barely use her iPad.
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