Dogtooth NR CC

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(69) IMDb 7.2/10
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A hyper-stylized mixture of physical violence and verbal comedy, Dogtooth is a darkly funny look at three teenagers confined to their parents' isolated country estate and kept under strict rule and regimen -- an inscrutable scenario that suggests a warped experiment in social conditioning and control. Terrorized into submission by their father, the children spend their days devising their own games and learning an invented vocabulary (a salt shaker is a "telephone," an armchair is "the sea") -- until a trusted outsider, brought in to satisfy the son's libidinal urges, starts offering forbidden VHS tapes in return for sexual favors.

Starring:
Michele Valley, Christos Stergioglou
Runtime:
1 hour 38 minutes

Dogtooth

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Dogtooth [Blu-ray]

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Product Details

Genres Drama, International
Director Giorgos Lanthimos
Starring Michele Valley, Christos Stergioglou
Supporting actors Aggeliki Papoulia, Hristos Passalis, Mary Tsoni, Anna Kalaitzidou, Steve Krikris, Sissy Petropoulou, Alexander Voulgaris
Studio Kino International
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

It starts of leaving you guessing about what is going on and ends the same way like there should have been more to it.
KR
Not graphically violent, but emotionally disconcerting, this film will insinuate itself into your mind--and it's absolutely unsettling.
K. Harris
The film takes place over a few days in the lives of the children as they are cut off further and further from the outside world.
Kevin F. Tasker

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 59 people found the following review helpful By K. Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on January 28, 2011
Format: DVD
Certainly one of the more surprising moments of the 2010 Academy Award nominations had to be the inclusion of the Greek oddity "Dogtooth" among the Best Foreign Film nominees. This psychological freak show seems designed to polarize audiences with its controversial presentation of an isolated family as a horror construct. The film, with relatively no political or social context, is likely to be interpreted in many ways by viewers searching for a grand significance to the proceedings. Having seen the film twice now, however, I'm not sure that I can really establish the filmmaker's true intentions with any veracity. So I won't try. Somewhere between perverse satire, bent domestic drama, and disturbing psychological horror lies the film "Dogtooth"--a challenging and unrepentantly bleak, yet undeniably gripping and fascinating, example of experimental cinema.

"Dogtooth" depicts the unorthodox life of one family. The three teenage children have been raised in a controlled environment in which they've seemingly never left the family's secluded estate. Subjected to the teaching of their parents, they know nothing of the real dangers or inherent freedoms available in the outside world. As their story unfolds, in horrifying daily detail, the complete destruction of their psyches, intelligence, and individuality at the hands of their parents is absolutely repellant. This truly is one of the more disturbing depictions of psychological torture (even if the kids don't know it!) that has ever been captured on film. Not graphically violent, but emotionally disconcerting, this film will insinuate itself into your mind--and it's absolutely unsettling.
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Roland E. Zwick on March 17, 2011
Format: DVD
****1/2

What if you could be the master of your own universe, able to make everything to your own specifications and liking? And what if, in that universe, you could have absolute control over your subjects, so that, not only would they have to do what you told them to, but you could even go so far as to shape the very way they look at the world?

The unnamed middle-aged protagonist (Christos Stergioglou) of "Dogtooth" has created just such a kingdom for himself and his wife (Michelle Valley), tucked away in a rural area of Greece, where the two of them have raised their children - a boy (Christos Passalis) and two girls (Aggelika Papoulia, Mary Tsoni) who are all now in their late teens - in such complete isolation that the kids have virtually no knowledge of the world that lies beyond the fenced-in little compound in which they live. They know only that it is a dangerous and scary place and that none of them will be able to venture out into it until their dogtooth falls out - which is to say never. They are so misinformed as to how the real world actually works that they think planes are just tiny objects moving through the air, and that if one of those tiny objects were to fall out of the sky and into their yard, the children would be able to pick it up and play with it like a toy. They've also been taught by their colluding parents to believe that prowling cats are a mortal menace to be destroyed on sight. The kids spend much of the day doing repetitive chores, playing meaningless games and being taught an incorrect vocabulary (they use the word "phone" when they really mean "salt," for example).
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28 of 35 people found the following review helpful By PsyRC on October 8, 2010
Format: DVD
Spoilers herein!!

Well, this film was highly anticipated by me (it had won the un Certain Regard prize at Cannes). The message is one of enclosed despair, it mirrors what it's like to be perpetually condemned to a preverbal state, and not having the tools to deal with it. It seems that, once play can no longer sustain oneself, one must retreat to a world of sexuality and aggression. Since the eldest daughter incorporated the nameless and hopeless lifestyle imposed by her parents, she was indeed an incarnation of their nefarious deeds. The only way to break free from their rules would be to attack their rules, and this could only be accomplished by attacking herself. The scene where she knocks her tooth out with a hammer is intense and realistic, yet behind pain and destruction there is beauty, in the disfigured and bloody smile leering back from the mirror. Life could no longer go on the way it had, the incestuous nature of the family unit had reached an extreme. In a bizarre bathtub scene, the brother sits there and gropes the naked bodies of his sisters, one at a time, I imagine in an attempt to see which causes him to be more aroused. As everything else that conveys true emotion in this family, the scene transpires in uncomfortable silence, the demon of preverbal communication again casting its shadow. Born preverbal, dead preverbal, as the labyrinth of abandoned speech is manifest in the eldest daughter's aborted escape, remaining locked in the car trunk, representing in a very vivid manner that, upon mustering the desire to leave the perverted Eden in whence she dwelled, she was in effect entering her coffin.
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