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Don Juan Paperback – September 13, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 376 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (September 13, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1466297492
  • ISBN-13: 978-1466297494
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 0.8 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,083,964 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Crazy Horse on March 12, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book stands alone as a hallmark classic. It is an epic tale, written with the prose and finesse of Lord George Byron in his internal longings and his passions toward all women of the world. With such a testimony to one of England's great romantic writers and lyricists, Byron hits the nail on the head with this work.

A good analogy, if not a comparison, is the film Don Juan DeMarco, starring Johnny Depp and Marlon Brando. Although set in rather modern terms, and arguably a tribute to Byron's written work, the screen play fit the book with a bit of a gossamer, yet unseen shadow of sorts. This book is the key to winning the heart of a woman in a method that fell away like the true chivalry of the past.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Beekums on April 14, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I never read Don Juan during my school years, although I had browsed through some other works by Byron. I doubt I ever would have looked at Don Juan were it not available as a free download here, and what a terrific read it has been: poetry written with joy and style and care. Byron chose his words with even more care than he did his ideas.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on July 29, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
When reading the first two Cantos I made a big mistake, a huge visual mistake: While reading in my Kindle, I used a font size that made the stanzas and lines look awkward, with verses almost always occupying more than one line. Once I reduced the size of the fonts, everything acquired the adequate proportions: I could see the stanzas forming a unit, and each verse occupying only one line, as it should be!

This is a wonderful book that makes for great reading. Lord Byron's mastery of English, coupled with his permanent irony and that wit that makes you laugh so often, bringing you back to earth with a thud after you had enjoyed a passage that seemed so lyric...

One thing I did miss in this Kindle edition was that the stanzas were not numbered. But again, it's a good edition, and it's for free.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By propertius on May 9, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Little more needs to be said about this classic and this e-book is really a delight. How pleasant to read such a work that has been on the best seller list for the truly literate for several hundred years. Although not a personal favorite of mine I do recognize the genius of the man. If the reader is thwarted by the length he can do no better than to read a stanza or two. This is not a "good read" which can be enjoyed in a sitting or two and much will be lost to the modern reader if does not consult annotations.

Byron is witty, wicked, irreverent, and many of today's aspiring writers can be learn much from his style and the breadth of his concerns which entail everything from the mundane to the sublime, unlike e.g. a Milton. But as I said, the reader should treat this as he would when reading a work such as Dante's "Commedia." and familiarize himself with the allusions that he makes. The rhythm and scansion of the poem is so perfect that it can be said that Byron took this form and ended the Romantic tradition much the way Bonnarati took his metier and left no room for a successor.

If you are a reader who is obsessed with reading the whole book before going on to others, perhaps you should meet Childe Harold first. And as an added bonus and you need more convincing, read the review by "Rudie" of this work, the man really knows his stuff and it"s probably worth the first third of a college course on Byron.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By John J. Stachel on July 25, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This mock epic shows Byron at his best: Wit, wisdom, cynicism, romanticism, mixed in Byron's unique and potent vintage drink. Dip into it, read it from start to finish-- you can't go wrong!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Rudie on March 26, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Lord Byron's Don Juan (pronounced "Joo-en" due to the Hudibrastic, deliberately off-kilter rhyme scheme) is a sweeping, romantic treatment of the Don Juan myth popular in Europe centuries before Byron's work and Mozart's opera. Readers who admire his romantic poetry will be well served by young Juan's romantic exploits. However, Byron's authorial intrusions, his narrative digressions, are what keep me coming back to Don Juan.
Nearly two centuries before the term "gonzo" had been introduced to describe Hunter S. Thompson's work, there is a gonzo current woven throughout the familiar Don Juan narrative in Byron's many narrative digressions. The satiric Dedication to then-Poet Laureate Robert Southey--damning him for his work's mediocrity and for selling out to flatter war-mongering tyrants--is still some juicy stuff. In that same Dedication, he also takes Wordsworth and Coleridge to task not only for selling out (Wordsworth even railed against the abolition of the slave trade!) but for the over-reach and incomprehensibility of their latest works. Re. Coleridge's metaphysics: "I wish he would explain his explanation." (Love that line!) Re. Wordsworth's Prelude, it's considered poetry when the dog star rages (i.e. Sirius, whose rising was said to induce madness in everybody).
Not all of Byron's digressions sound like he's on a bender and calling for hock and soda water, as one excised passage from Don Juan says.
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