Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Don Quixote, U.S.A Hardcover – January 1, 1966


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$101.11 $50.00
Paperback, Import
"Please retry"
$50.00
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner's Sons; 1st edition (1966)
  • ASIN: B0007E0J7S
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.7 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,675,877 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By W. Derrick on November 8, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Like the reviewer below, I first encountered this book (which concerns a Peace Corps volunteer who inadvertantly ends up leading a revolution in a Caribbean banana republic) as a teenager, in the form of a Reader's Digest condensed book. Finally, after haunting used book stores for many years, I recently found a copy of the complete novel -- and it was absolutely worth all the fuss. Powell's gentle wit and the over-the-top naivete, not to say stupidity, of the main character are delightful. His characterization of the tinhorn dictator (El Toro), his henchman and assorted revolutionaries is priceless. Favorite quote: "They are a specially picked squad from our finest unit, the Regiment of the Thirteenth of September, named for the day on which the Generalisimo freed our groaning land from the yoke of his predecessor. Before that it was the Regiment of the Second of July, the day on which the predecessor of the Generalisimo freed our groaning land from the yoke of HIS predecessor. Before that..."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By windcheetah on May 7, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I read this book first as a Reader' Digest selection, then I found a copy at a local library. Read it several times, and still found it funny. I wish it would be reprinted - I'd like a copy - it would still be as fresh today as it was back when I was a kid.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By figloosh on July 22, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Funny, touching, poignant, at the time it was written a topical book, that can be reread and enjoyed time and time again. If you enjoy this book read Pioneer Go Home, by the same author, Richard Powell.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By M. Schuster on November 2, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I'm cheating a little - I've read the Reader's Digest Condensed version of this book, and haven't yet read the full-length version because I can't find it. This was very funny and very clever. The hero thinks he is going into the jungle to covert banana growers to growing Dwarf Cavandish bananas, he is really sent just to get his bumbling out of the way, and ends up through a series of mishaps and misunderstandings to be the leader of the revolutionaries in the jungle. Sort of Inspector Clousseau and the nearsighted character that gets himself in and out of situations with out realizing - Mr. McGoo? This was cleverly done, though, and the hero stayed sympathetic throughout. He is actually pretty resourceful and talented, just clueless as to what is going on. If I remember right, he first thinks the revolutionaries are banana farmers. When he joins the revolution, they are all almost starving and fighting each other. He decides to have them catch fish, and using a net he found, sets up teams to fish and teaches them how to cook. Only the revolution's one airplane gets bombed because he used the camoflage netting. "Before him we had a revolution and no food - now we have food and no revolution." Lighthearted and fun. I would like to read the full version.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again