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Don Quixote and the Windmills Hardcover – April 2, 2004


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From the creators of the bestselling There Was an Old Monkey Who Swallowed a Frog comes a silly, "out of this world" rendition of the popular Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly song. See more featured titles for kids 6 - 8

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Gr. 2-4, younger for reading aloud. Cervantes' famous character gets new life in this adaptation, which zeroes in on the incident for which Don Quixote is perhaps best known--the one in which he tilts at windmills. The story begins as Senor Quexada goes mad, burying himself in the past and re-creating himself as Don Quixote, "a renowned knight." To that end, he puts on a suit of rusty armor, chooses a fat farmer as his squire and sweet Dulcinea as the object of his courtly love, and sets off. Spotting windmills in the distance, Don Quixote sees the structures as giants and refuses to be dissuaded about the objects' real nature. The telling here is staid, leaving the art to express most of the excitement. And it does. Veteran artist Fisher, known for his solid, impressive renderings, brings a suppleness to the artwork that captures a tale bubbling with action. The spreads in which Don Quixote becomes caught on the windmill's canvas and is pulled here and there are dramatically rendered, with perspective changing on every page. An informative author's note explains the story's history. Ilene Cooper
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

"Kimmel's narrative maintains the wry tone of Cervantes's original...youngster's will find themselves rooting for The Knight of the Mournful Countenance...Fisher's signature illustrations are the ideal accompaniment to the sprightly text...An ideal appetite whetter." -- School Library Journal

"Veteran artist Fisher, known for his solid, impressive renderings, brings a suppleness to the artwork that captures a story bubbling with action." -- Booklist
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 - 10 years
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR); 1st edition (April 2, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374318255
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374318253
  • Product Dimensions: 12.1 x 9.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #418,927 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By M. Heiss on April 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I feel about Don Quixote the way I feel about Gulliver - children need to know the story to relate to the metaphors like "tilting at windmills" or "lilliputian"... but they don't need to get bogged down reading the whole story. We read Cervantes's book during my junior year of high school, and really - all you need is this retelling by Eric A. Kimmel. Leonard Everett Fisher's illustrations put you right up close in the action.

And of course, the thrill of living a purposeful life, and the dissatisfaction with ordinary life: those are human universals.

Your kids will love it. Read it to them. You can laugh together.

Don't skip the author's note at the back - details of Cervantes' life. I didn't know he had been captured by pirates and sold into slavery in Algiers. Did you?

(Our favorite picture book retelling of Gulliver's Travels is by Margaret Hodges, "Gulliver in Lilliput")

If your children really love this story, try the illustrated book "The Knight and the Squire" by Argentina Palacios -- it gives more of the novel and is great for older children.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By E. Branscomb on January 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Bought this as a present for a knight-loving child who loves the book, the drawings are very well done and are very interesting to look at...
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gail Cooke HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 22, 2004
Format: Hardcover
A much sought after illustrator and writer Leonard Everett Fisher gives vivid life to this classic tale. The producer of over 200 children's books, his bold full-color pictures are unforgettable images of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza.
This hallmark of Spanish literature by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra was written in 1605 and published to great acclaim. Obviously, it has endured for centuries and will for centuries to come.
As most know, it is a tale of a rather ordinary fellow who has immersed himself in so much literature about knighthood that he believes he can be a knight. The story has become a much heralded Broadway musical, and the stuff of which dreams are made.
Sancho Panza, a neighboring farmer, is the rotund companion chosen by Don Quixote. He, too, has become very much a part of our culture as a faithful follower.
Kimmel, speaking for Don Quixote closes this version of his story with "Our names and the stories of our matchless deeds will resound through the ages." And they have.
- Gail Cooke
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