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Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands Paperback – September 12, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (September 12, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307276643
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307276643
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #152,285 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Bawdy, brilliant, human and humorous . . . full of unexpected delights--everything a modern novel should be."–The Denver Post

“A charismatic storyteller. . . . No other Latin American writer is more genuinely admired by his peers, nor has any other exerted so great a creative influence on the course of Latin American fiction."–The New York Times Book Review

"A sentimental masterpiece."–Los Angeles Times;

"Poetic, comical and very human."–Chicago Tribune

“One of the greatest writers . . . also one of the most entertaining.” –Mario Vargas Llosa

Language Notes

Text: English, Portugese (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

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Customer Reviews

I've read about a dozen of his works.
C. J. Peiffer
Amado's books are filled with colorful details that enhance the accurate picture he paints of the Brazilian culture.
Pro Artz
I was sad to come to the last page of this book, and I am surely to read this superb novel again.
Claus Hetting

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 57 people found the following review helpful By C. J. Peiffer on December 28, 1997
Format: Paperback
I lived in Brazil for several years and fell in love with Brazilian author Jorge Amado. "Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon" received some notoriety in the U.S. in the 50s or 60s, although Amado hasn't made much of a splash here since then. But his books are wonderful and shouldn't be missed. Apparently Amado was the son of cacao plantation owners, but when he wrote his first works in the 20s exposing land owners for their cruelty to workers, he was more or less disowned. I've read about a dozen of his works. Although each is very different, they seem to have recurring themes. Most take place in Brazil's underdeveloped Northeast, in Bahia or Sergipe. Women are often the heroines. Perhaps in further rebellion against his family, most of his characters are on the seamy side of society ---drunks, prostitutes, street people, con artists. Much of his work includes themes of death although not morbidly so. All are spiced with the superstitions, spells, and magic typical of folk religions that have their roots in the pagan beliefs of Africa transported to Brazil by slaves. "Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands" attracted some attention when the movie version appeared in the U.S. The Brazilian film, starring Sonia Braga, is one of my all-time favorites. It is funny, melancholy, romantic, and erotic ---but the novel is all that and much more. The story takes place in the 1940s. Flor, who runs a small cooking school in her home in Salvador, is married to Vadinho, who gambles, whores around, takes Flor's money, slaps her around, and is a master con artist who can charm even the padre. His only redeeming quality is that he is great in bed, tapping into Flor's deepest desires. But during one riotous night of Carnaval frivolity, Vadinho drops dead.Read more ›
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29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Mazza HALL OF FAME on July 20, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands," by Jorge Amado, is a richly entertaining novel. The book has been translated into English by Harriet de Onis. "Dona Flor" tells the story of the title character, a cooking instructor who is widowed and who eventually contemplates remarriage.
"Dona Flor" is a big, sensuous, lusty novel that colorfully evokes the food, music, dance, sexual mores, ethnic diversity, and religious diversity of Brazil. Amado creates a huge tapestry of fascinating characters: the admirable Dona Flor; Vadinho, her roguish first husband; Dona Rozilda, her meddling mother; the gossipy Dona Dinora; gambling czar Pelancchi Moulas; and more.
Amado enlivens the novel with many delightful touches. He sprinkles Brazilian recipes into the text, and also offers insights into Candomble, an Afro-Brazilian folk religion with a colorful pantheon of deities.
"Dona Flor" is full of funny, romantic, and sexy scenes. The novel's plot also has an important magical/supernatural element. I highly recommend this novel, especially to those who are interested in Brazilian literature.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Pro Artz on March 26, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I lived in Brazil for several years and fell in love with Jorge Amado, a Brazilian author few Americans have heard of, although his novels have been translated into a zillion languages. Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon received some notoriety in the U.S. in the 50s or 60s, although Amado's works have not made much of a splash here since then. But his books are wonderful and shouldn't be missed.

Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands attracted some attention when the movie version appeared in the U.S. with English subtitles. The Brazilian film, starring Sonia Braga, is one of my all-time favorites. It is funny, melancholy, romantic, and erotic ---but the novel is all that and much more.

The story takes place in the 1940s. Flor, who runs a cooking school in her home in Salvador, is married to Vadinho, who gambles his wife's money, slaps her around, frequents brothels, and is a master con artist who can charm even the local padre. His only redeeming quality is that he knows exactly how to tap into Flor's deepest sexual desires. But during one riotous night of Carnaval frivolity, Vadinho drops dead.

After a suitable period of mourning, Flor is pursued by Teodoro, a pharmacist who is everything Vadinho was not. Teodoro has a steady job, is responsible, honest, and respectable, and is careful with money. Only on their wedding night does Flor discover one other way he differs from Vadinho ---he's a dud at making love. Flor, a passionate woman, appeals to the gods for help and eventually figures out how to enjoy both of her husbands.

Apparently Amado was the son of cacao plantation owners, but when he wrote his first works in the 20s, exposing land owners for their cruelty to workers, he was more or less disowned.
Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 28, 1997
Format: Paperback
Not many women know what they want and what they need -they're often two different things. But Dona Flor explores love and marriage to two different men at the same time. Once married to a rascal who dies of heart failure during a fiesta, Flor eventually settles for a stable second hubby, a pharmacist who somehow fails to make chemistry work on the matrimonial sheets. Readers will have great fun discovering with Flor what happens when love (and lust) actually live on after death.
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