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  • Dondestan: Revisited
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Dondestan: Revisited Enhanced, Original recording remastered


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Audio CD, Enhanced, Original recording remastered, March 15, 2005
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Music

Image of album by Robert Wyatt

Photos

Image of Robert Wyatt

Biography

Robert Wyatt is a rare bird. His remarkable career began forty years ago drumming and singing for Soft Machine, a post-psych outfit tied to the “Canterbury Scene” of the late ‘60s that yielded Pink Floyd & Gong among others. His ensuing and far longer solo period speaks volumes
of Wyatt’s value and endurance as an ... Read more in Amazon's Robert Wyatt Store

Visit Amazon's Robert Wyatt Store
for 40 albums, 3 photos, discussions, and more.


Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 15, 2005)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Enhanced, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Hannibal
  • ASIN: B0000241BL
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #562,204 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. CP Jeebies
2. N.I.O. (New Information Order)
3. Dondestan
4. Sight Of The Wind
5. Shrinkrap
6. Catholic Architecture
7. Worship
8. Costa (Memories Of Under-Development)
9. Left On Man
10. Lisp Service

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The power of Robert’s art resides in its understatement" -- WIRE

"Wyatt has crafted solo albums that have fused left-tiling politics, far ranging musical textures, and spry pop alertness" -- BILLBOARD

Product Description

Founding member of art rock group Soft Machine, Robert Wyatt, helped set the tone of the sixties psychedelic scene in the UK. With his distinctive drumming and vocals, Wyatt attracted a massive following across Europe. An accident in 1973 left the drummer paralyzed forcing him to shift efforts on solo recordings. His distinct style of mixing simple and effective keyboard melody lines with poignant lyrics, often filled with personal and political references, have proved both haunting and reflective. Rykodisc is proud to introduce you to 4 re-mastered Wyatt classics - Old Rottenhat, Nothing Can Stop Us, Dondestan (Revisited), Shleep.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Elliot Knapp on May 30, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Robert Wyatt's (roughly) 5th full-length studio album, Dondestan, was his first of the 90's, only his second since the 70's, and began the relatively steady stream of albums that he has produced since, and oh yeah, it's a great album and an absolutely necessary part of his catalog.

In many ways, Dondestan picks up where Wyatt's previous full-length, Old Rottenhat, left off, in both theme and music. Wyatt still plays all of the instruments (mostly different keyboards, percussion, and vocals), and either wrote or co-wrote all of the songs with his wife, Alfreda Benge (except for "Lisp Service," whose music was written by ex-Soft Machine bandmate Hugh Hopper). As a result, the album is a seamless whole--the songs flow quite naturally, and the album has a characteristic overall sound. Despite its similarities, Dondestan is different from (and stronger than, in my opinion) its predecessor, Old Rottenhat. Dondestan is considerably more downbeat than Old Rottenhat, with only a couple tracks (like the clever and upbeat "Shrinkrap" and the playful political commentary of "Dondestan") breaking its narcotic, intoxicating spell. Surprisingly, the record's overall slowness doesn't detract, since the songs performances and moods are all so well done. Improvements from the last record also include more accessible instrumentation--Wyatt still uses his characteristic unidentifiable keyboards, but he's also incorporated a lot more piano, which gives the album a more organic sound than the last--and the political/ideological edge that was so apparent on Old Rottenhat, though not absent, is less up front, and is not a feature of many of the songs (mostly those with Benge's lyrics).
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Elliot Knapp on May 30, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Robert Wyatt's (roughly) 5th full-length studio album, Dondestan, was his first of the 90's, only his second since the 70's, and began the relatively steady stream of albums that he has produced since, and oh yeah, it's a great album and an absolutely necessary part of his catalog.

In many ways, Dondestan picks up where Wyatt's previous full-length, Old Rottenhat, left off, in both theme and music. Wyatt still plays all of the instruments (mostly different keyboards, percussion, and vocals), and either wrote or co-wrote all of the songs with his wife, Alfreda Benge (except for "Lisp Service," whose music was written by ex-Soft Machine bandmate Hugh Hopper). As a result, the album is a seamless whole--the songs flow quite naturally, and the album has a characteristic overall sound. Despite its similarities, Dondestan is different from (and stronger than, in my opinion) its predecessor, Old Rottenhat. Dondestan is considerably more downbeat than Old Rottenhat, with only a couple tracks (like the clever and upbeat "Shrinkrap" and the playful political commentary of "Dondestan") breaking its narcotic, intoxicating spell. Surprisingly, the record's overall slowness doesn't detract, since the songs performances and moods are all so well done. Improvements from the last record also include more accessible instrumentation--Wyatt still uses his characteristic unidentifiable keyboards, but he's also incorporated a lot more piano, which gives the album a more organic sound than the last--and the political/ideological edge that was so apparent on Old Rottenhat, though not absent, is less up front, and is not a feature of many of the songs (mostly those with Benge's lyrics).
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Elliot Knapp on May 30, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Robert Wyatt's (roughly) 5th full-length studio album, Dondestan, was his first of the 90's, only his second since the 70's, and began the relatively steady stream of albums that he has produced since, and oh yeah, it's a great album and an absolutely necessary part of his catalog.

In many ways, Dondestan picks up where Wyatt's previous full-length, Old Rottenhat, left off, in both theme and music. Wyatt still plays all of the instruments (mostly different keyboards, percussion, and vocals), and either wrote or co-wrote all of the songs with his wife, Alfreda Benge (except for "Lisp Service," whose music was written by ex-Soft Machine bandmate Hugh Hopper). As a result, the album is a seamless whole--the songs flow quite naturally, and the album has a characteristic overall sound. Despite its similarities, Dondestan is different from (and stronger than, in my opinion) its predecessor, Old Rottenhat. Dondestan is considerably more downbeat than Old Rottenhat, with only a couple tracks (like the clever and upbeat "Shrinkrap" and the playful political commentary of "Dondestan") breaking its narcotic, intoxicating spell. Surprisingly, the record's overall slowness doesn't detract, since the songs performances and moods are all so well done. Improvements from the last record also include more accessible instrumentation--Wyatt still uses his characteristic unidentifiable keyboards, but he's also incorporated a lot more piano, which gives the album a more organic sound than the last--and the political/ideological edge that was so apparent on Old Rottenhat, though not absent, is less up front, and is not a feature of many of the songs (mostly those with Benge's lyrics).
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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