Don't Be Afraid of the Dark 2011 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(193) IMDb 5.6/10
Available in HD
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Sally, a young girl, moves to Rhode Island to live with her father and his new girlfriend in the 19th-century mansion they are restoring. While exploring the house, Sally starts to hear voices coming from creatures in the basement whose hidden agenda is to claim her as one of their own.

Starring:
Katie Holmes, Guy Pearce
Runtime:
1 hour 40 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Don't Be Afraid of the Dark

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Product Details

Genres Fantasy, Thriller, Horror
Director Troy Nixey
Starring Katie Holmes, Guy Pearce
Supporting actors Bailee Madison, Jack Thompson, Garry McDonald, Alan Dale, Julia Blake, Bruce Gleeson, Eddie Ritchard, Carolyn Shakespeare-Allen, David Tocci, Lance Drisdale, Nicholas Bell, Libby Gott, James Mackay, Emelia Burns, Trudy Hellier, Terry Kenwrick, Grant Piro, Todd MacDonald
Studio Film District
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Acting is very good.
Robert Papania
Guillermo del Toro of "Pan's Labyrinth" fame presents (not directs) "Don't Be Afraid of the Dark," a tepid horror remake directed by first-timer Troy Nixey.
Tsuyoshi
So for the rest of the movie we know that no one will believe anything she says.
M. Oleson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

78 of 93 people found the following review helpful By K. Sommerfield on November 16, 2011
Format: DVD
As I start my review for "Don't Be Afraid of the Dark" I must confess one thing: I'm not a fan of supernatural horror movies. While I admire haunted house films like "Poltergeist", I've always found this sub-genre of horror to be painfully dull and its characters to be agonizingly stupid ("The Amityville Horror", I'm looking at you). They usually have the same formula: a stupid, yuppie couple (occasionally with children) buy a house, move in, hear strange noises, and bad things happen. Rinse and repeat. So, going into "Don't Be Afraid of the Dark", my expectations were pretty low. After reading some not so positive reviews online, they sank even further. So is "Don't Be Afraid of the Dark" worth screaming for? Well..more on that in a bit.

The film begins with a gruesome prologue shows the home's deranged first owner, Emerson Blackwood, luring his maid into the dungeon-like basement and performing medieval dentistry on the terrified young woman. As he carries out the atrocity, he explains to the young maid that they, the goblin-like creatures known as Homunculi, have taken his son and will only give him back with teeth. As the young woman screams, whispering can be heard all around the room from the sealed up fireplace. Blackwood makes his way over to the fireplace and offers the teeth in exchange for the return of his son, only to be told his offering wasn't acceptable and he is pulled into the fireplace. The basement is sealed and forgotten over the generations.

The movie then opens with a young girl, Sally Hirst (Bailee Madison), moving into Blackwood Manor, the Gothic mansion being restored by her architect father Alex (Guy Pearce) and his girlfriend Kim (Katie Holmes), an interior decorator.
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Format: DVD
"This place isn't safe here, especially for kids." Sally is sent by her mother to live with her father (Pearce) and his girlfriend (Holmes) in an old house that they are trying to fix up. Sally is not happy there and while she is out running around she finds a hidden door. The older grounds keeper tries to warn to stay away. When Sally unknowingly unlocks a hidden evil the house and the family is in severe danger. This movie was much better then I was expecting, but I wasn't expecting much. This has a definite "Pan's Laberynth" feel to it, and that is enough to keep you watching. I wouldn't call this a scary movie as much as a disturbing movie. There are a few little stomach jumpers in this, but most of the time you are on the edge of your seat and waiting for what you know is coming to come. While the movie is tense and keeps you watching it's nothing really amazing. The ending of the movie really makes it better because the movie has the guts to end the way it does and that really changes the way you feel about it. Overall, a very OK movie that is made better because of the ending. Worth a watch though. I give it a B.
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Format: DVD
A rule to live by: If you find yourself in a house that's haunted, get out of the house. But people will persist in dismissing those ominous signposts, those telltale clues. In horror pictures, children tend to be more savvy than the grown-ups, and they normally heed those twitches of primordial unease. But I guess little Sally, sullen and desolate and unbelievably unhappy, is the one exception. I think that Bailee Madison, who plays Sally, manages to construct an intriguing character. Madison isn't cutesy-ootsy in that obvious Hollywood kid actor way, and this makes her refreshing. It's not her fault the screenplay has her reacting unbelievably to what unfolds in the spooky mansion.

DON'T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK is based on the original 1973 teleplay which starred Kim Darby, and it supposedly had a lasting impact on a young Guillermo del Toro. Del Toro co-produces and co-writes this 2011 reimagining, except that one wishes he'd directed it as well. Because while you have to credit this retelling for its moody cinematography and its creepy gothic vibe and its stab at psychological horror, you also condemn some of its choices and its lapses in logic.

How would you feel if you were a little kid and one neglectful parent passes you to the other? Sally, relocating from the warmth of Los Angeles to the depressing climate of the east coast, scorns her father's welcome, ignores his girlfriend Kim's (Katie Holmes) friendly overtures. Sally retreats into her own little world.

There are whispers of the horror lying dormant in the Blackwood manor (also called Fallen Mill), disquieting rumors surrounding the mad artist who had lived in it decades and decades ago.
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Format: Blu-ray
A remake of a 1973 TV movie "Don't Be Afraid of The Dark" is an atmospheric thriller that doesn't quite deliver on the its promise but still manages to be entertaining even if it is a tad contrived. Co-writers Guillermo Del Toro and Matthew Robbins use the original TV movie as the primary basis for this new version (although uncredited the 1973 script written by Nigel McKeand was reportedly based on H. P. Lovecraft's "The Rats in the Walls")altering the dynamic of the original script which didn't use a child as the main focus of the TV movie.

Co-producer Guillermo Del Toro ("Hellboy", "Chronos", "Pan's Labyrinth")and co-writer Matthew Robbins ("Dragonslayer", "*batteries not included")along with first time director Troy Nixey create an impressive looking movie with some strong performances particularly from Baliee Madison. The main problem with "Don't Be Afriad of the Dark" is that despite the impressive production design, acting talent and moody photography "Don't Be Afraid of The Dark" isn't very scary.

Sally (Madison) is a little girl who feels lost as she's shuffled off to live with her father Alex (Guy Pearce)and Alex's girlfriend Kim (Katie Holmes) who specialize in renovating older, dilapited mansions. Sally discovers there are creatures living in the Blackwood home that abduct children.

Unfortunately Pearce isn't given much to work with as Alex who primarily comes across as a twit and Katie Holmes character of Kim although written a bit more sympathetically doesn't have much depth either.

The Blu-ray looks marvelous with a nicely detailed, moody presentation of the film. Skin tones are solid thorughout. Blacks are solid throughout and given that this is such a dark, moody looking film that's a good thing.
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