Don't Believe Everything You Think and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.99
  • Save: $4.72 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 25? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: 100% guaranteed delivery with Fulfillment By Amazon. Pages of this book are clean. The spine of this book is clean and solid. This paperback book shows standard shelf wear associated with limited use. This is a former Library book with normal library stamping and stickers. Purchase of this item will benefit the Friends of the Houston Public Library.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Don't Believe Everything You Think: The 6 Basic Mistakes We Make in Thinking Paperback


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.27
$6.79 $1.86

Frequently Bought Together

Don't Believe Everything You Think: The 6 Basic Mistakes We Make in Thinking + The Reality of ESP: A Physicist's Proof of Psychic Abilities + Entangled Minds: Extrasensory Experiences in a Quantum Reality
Price for all three: $41.58

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 286 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books (May 2, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591024080
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591024088
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (69 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #348,170 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Don't Believe Everything You Think is essential reading for anyone interested in the psychology of belief and pseudoscientific thinking. It also provides one of the best arguments around for the importance of science literacy..." -- Skeptic

"This is an informative, interesting, and entertaining contribution ...[Kida] goes beyond simply describing our false beliefs to describing the ways in which we acquire them. This book is a valuable resource in the ongoing, difficult process of developing critical thinking." -- Skeptical Inquirer

"Even the most rational-minded readers may be surprised by how many errors in thinking they make without even noticing. Those looking to sharpen their critical thinking and decision-making skills will appreciate this eye-opening book." -- Kirkus Reports

Listed as a Critical Thinking Classic in Skeptic magazine


"Don't Believe Everything You Think is a treat. Thomas Kida brings the science of psychology to the public, explaining how we often believe things because we want to, even when they are not true...Even if you haven't worried about the minefields of thinking, you'll want to read this book." -- Elizabeth Loftus, Distinguished Professor at the University of California, Irvine and former President of the Association for Psychological Science

"How can we tell the difference between what is true and false? The answer is science and critical thinking, a process that Thomas Kida, in this exceptionally readable and delightfully informative book, explicates with clarity. His '6 basic mistakes we make in thinking' should be printed on a laminated wallet-sized card and examined every morning before we go out into the world." -- Michael Shermer, publisher of Skeptic magazine, columnist for Scientific American, and author of Why People Believe Weird Things

About the Author

Thomas Kida (Amherst, MA) is a professor in the Isenberg School of Management at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and the author of many articles on decision-making.

More About the Author

Thomas Kida (Amherst, MA) is a professor in the Isenberg School of Management at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and the author of many articles on decision-making.

Customer Reviews

Clarity-- The book is very clear and easy to read.
Lemas Mitchell
This is definitely a must have/read book, it will outstandingly change your perspective on what and how you think about everything.
XLScience
If you believe in ghosts or auras or ESP you will be offended by the way they are dismissed by the author as clearly not true.
ellen foster

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

205 of 208 people found the following review helpful By The Spinozanator VINE VOICE on August 2, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of my favorite quotes is from Robert Wright's "Moral Animal:" "...human beings are a species splendid in their array of moral equipment, tragic in their propensity to misuse it, and pathetic in their ignorance of the misuse." Although this book is not about the morality of our decision-making, it is completely about how we delude ourselves about ourselves, our situations, and others.

Borrowing heavily from Carl Sagan, Michael Shermer, Skeptic Magazine, and Skeptic Inquirer, Kida starts off with standard issue debunking of pseudoscience. Soon he zeroes in and concentrates on the faulty ways we reach assessments. These methods worked quite well in our small tribe hunting-gathering days, but nowadays we could do better.

At the risk of losing half the readers of this review, I'll spill the beans. Kida believes in statistics, whereas people evolved to believe in anecdotes. People confidently rely on intuition, then remember the hits and ignore the misses. People seek to confirm what they already believe and gloss over contradictory evidence. People rarely consider the role of chance and coincidence, preferring to give credit to metaphysical causes. People consistently misinterpret events to bolster their deluded self-images. People oversimplify complex situations, tending to shun the gray areas for black or white assessments. Finally, our memories are the pits - remolding and enhancing the original memory more and more as time goes by.

For the above data, Kida has documentation galore, but in the face of volumes of evidence, we continue to do more of the same. After blasting our anecdotal way of proving our theories, Kida uses his own anecdotes, saying "we evolved to love learning from stories.
Read more ›
14 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
108 of 112 people found the following review helpful By Kat Bakhu on May 17, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
How much better of a country we would have if everyone was required to read and digest this book before getting a high school diploma. We would at least have a population that understands what science, and the scientific method are. The author's explanation of science and pseudo-science, and how they differ, is excellent.

The author covers six common factors that cause us to be mis-guided by our thoughts. Honestly, when I read the list of 6 factors, I had a kind of ho-hum attitude. I didn't see how he could make explicating such obvious things (e.g., we don't always perceive reality accurately) interesting. But he surprised me! His book is very interesting, page after page. His anecdotes and explanations have a way of popping open one's brain cells, allowing one to reflect with much deeper insight on how various factors cause our thinking to send us into wasteful, and even destructive, dead-ends. I particularly enjoyed how well the author demonstrated that if there is no way to show that a hypothesis is false, there is nothing more we can do with it.

I really enjoyed this book. Since we are all dictated by our thoughts, I think that everyone would benefit from reading it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
49 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Robert Ashton on February 8, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm not completely sure what it is that I don't like about the style of writers for management. Maybe it's the insistence on the superficial, chatty, bouncy style of writing. Thomas Kida is a professor in the Isenberg School of Management and adopts this style, which somewhat undermines the very important points he makes. Yes, it's easy to read but I wouldn't mind a little more challenge in a book about the sometimes critical decision errors that we make due to our evolutionary past.

The book is subtitle "the 6 basic mistakes..." - "the six pack of problems" as he calls them, which he lists in sequence. However, the majority of the book is not structured to follow that sequence. It seems to be rather an afterthought (or a good publicity idea).

He readily admits that the book is built on the work of others and it really is. Much of the discussion on weird beliefs and pseudoscientific thinking is a rehash of Shermer and Sagan (and he credits them both). Having said that it does bring together a lot of different information and work by others and does explain how and why we all make these errors in reasoning. For a book on decision making, he goes too much into UFO's, false memories etc. His discussions on probability and why we misjudge is much more interesting and helpful.

Overall, as I've said, it's an easy read and does cover a lot of interesting ground. However, it really doesn't bring much new for anyone who has read generally about these sorts of issues. A pretty good introduction but I just wish writers like this would credit their readers with a little more intelligence and literacy.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
57 of 65 people found the following review helpful By Robert G. Muller on February 6, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After reading a review of this book in e-Skeptic, I immediately ordered a copy. If there's one thing that could transform the world into a better place, it's the implementation of informed critical thinking in the general population. I have always been a proponent of Plutarch's belief that the mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be lit, and am always in eager anticipation of books that may light those fires.

The title is a bit misleading, as it oversimplifies the author's scope. But the use of numbered lists in book and article titles (Ten Ways To Do This, Five Things You Can Do To Improve That, etc.) is a pretty standard marketing ploy to attract readers seeking simple answers.

If I had written of the review of the book after only 30-50 pages, I would not have given it a great review. It felt a bit choppy and lacking direction early on. The author seemed to worship statistics without the same level of skepticism applied to anecdotal evidence. All of this was fully rectified later in the book.

Kida's approach is not only theoretical. He uses real-life scenarios to show how decision-making based on poor information and/or improper processing of information affects our lives in negative ways.

There was one glaring omission: You can't talk about belief in the paranormal, superstition, and an aversion to fact-based and proven theory-based thinking without noting at some point that we live in a society where children are indoctrinated to believe in anti-science.
Read more ›
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa4f4dd14)