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Don't Believe the Hype: Fighting Cultural Misinformation About African Americans Paperback – February 1, 1995


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Plume (February 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0452270960
  • ISBN-13: 978-0452270961
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,194,665 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The stated purpose of Chideya's book is to "give readers a chance to question the depictions of race that have become standard in newspapers and on the nightly news, a map through the modern realities and misconceptions about race." She succeeds in 18 chapters, each of which discusses an issue, then examines the reality behind frequently asked questions and frequently held myths. For example, Chideya disputes the idea that most welfare mothers are black, have lots of children and no desire to work by citing figures on the ratio of black and white women on welfare, the average number of children each recipient has and their efforts in finding and keeping work. She uses this formula to tackle affirmative action, the armed forces, drugs, gangs, violence, sex, family values, politics and other issues. For someone with her news reporting background (a former staff reporter for Newsweek, she now works for MTV news), Chideya doesn't offer many supporting quotes. More personal insight from African Americans who have been stereotyped as the welfare mother, violent purse snatcher or hopeless drug addict would have offered greater readability and personality to what often sounds like a well-researched senior thesis. Still, the facts alone will make for good discussions after the evening news.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
Chideya's book dispells many popular myths about African Americans that are rampant in the media, literature, etc. She paints a vivid picture of how people perceive "others" and the misconceptions that are created and perpetuated by ignorance. I have been told that this book is no longer in print because of its content...probably because some people do not want the truth to be known! Farai Chideya's book is am important and enlightening one that should be read by anyone who is in search of the "real" truth! This is probably the most informative book I have come across in years...
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9 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Patricia DosSantos(Plum59@hotmail.com) on December 21, 1998
Format: Paperback
If you are a human being living in a society where equality matters, you must read this book. It focuses on several aspects of the African-American in our modern society, that are the main cause for injustice and stereotypes. Chideya tries to break these stereotypes by giving cold figures from the 1990 census. If you are interested in being a less stereotypical person, don't leave home without this master-piece
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18 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Justin Kuczynski on August 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
Throughout much of this book, Chideya uses a very quantitative approach -with plenty of statistics- to prove her arguments. In my opinon though, she often doesn't supply all the pertinent stats, and occasionally draws conclusions that are either too simplistic or not suggested by the figures she uses. In all, I didn't feel like my own opinions were firmly challenged while reading this book.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nappy Reality on March 15, 2012
Format: Paperback
I read this book a long time ago and decided to re-read it recently due to some disturbing trends in how mainstream-controlled media depicts Black romantic relationships. I was again impressed with farai's even-handed statistical assessment and examples of how information about Black folks is twisted or is just not mentioned. It is still happening today on a more sophisticated level. The book made me take a fresh look at who benefits from this type of scapegoating and the steps that can be taken to counteract it. I would love to see a "Don't Believe The Hype 2""!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By AMF on October 25, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is easy to read. It is a very informative, well presented and relevant book. An excellent read for anyone.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By jMae on January 3, 2008
Format: Paperback
I found the information enlightening when I purchased the book so many years ago. Today, my children(ages 18 through 34) are reading this book and finding the information relevant and important. I would appreciate an update on the orginal information.
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9 of 16 people found the following review helpful By mistermaxxx08 HALL OF FAME on June 4, 2000
Format: Paperback
I've Followed Farai Chideya from the times she was Speaking on CNN.She is a Very Intelligent SISTER with a Way Of Putting Her Point Across On TIme.THis Book breaks Down ALot OF Things About Race&Stereotypes.Her Intelligent way Of Wording Knocks The Ignorance on it's Backs.Very Informative&Important.more Books Such as This are Needed.
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