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Don't Hurt People and Don't Take Their Stuff: A Libertarian Manifesto
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59 of 63 people found the following review helpful
If you operate under the premise that either the Democratic or Republican Party represents the best interests of this country or its citizens, you probably shouldn't buy this book. As a libertarian myself, I'm often asked to explain my political philosophy in a short phrase, and I've generally gone with, "More Freedom, Less Government," but this book provides a more detailed approach that is also accessible. Those enamored with the power of the State will trash this book without having read it (see the 1 Star reviews), but it's actually a cogent argument for freedom and individualism as a solution to the problems our country is facing today. It is concise, well-written and engaging. Read it with an open mind and it will be a great use of your time.
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43 of 46 people found the following review helpful
on April 8, 2014
I actually didn't have too high expectations about this book but I was more than pleasantly surprised. "Don't Hurt People and Don't Take Their Stuff" is actually pretty good. A concise, eminently readable, straightforward Libertarian Manifesto with 6 simple "Rules for Liberty" - #1 Don't Hurt People, #2 Don't take people's stuff, #3 Take Responsibility, #4 Work for it, #5 Mind your own business, and #6 Fight the Power. This is not a work of deep philosophical thought but it nicely condenses a number of great works that are. I recommend it most especially to those who have not personally read Ayn Rand, Thomas Sowell, Adam Smith, F.A. Hayek, and Ludwig von Mises and are looking to acquire a basic understanding of libertarian philosophy.
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43 of 47 people found the following review helpful
on April 4, 2014
Libertarians love to get bogged down in complicated policy debates, which, while undeniably fun, is not often helpful in converting others to the cause. What Kibbe has so skillfully done here, is succinctly stated the essence of the philosophy right there in the title. Don’t Hurt People and Don’t Take Their Stuff.

Personally, I’m hard pressed to see how anyone could disagree with two so evidently moral and straightforward principles, but the fact remains that many people still do. We have to be constantly aware that the (admittedly noble) desire to use government for good always requires instituting force against the innocent.

This is a great and necessary book that highlights the abuses of government, from the current administration going back to JFK and Nixon, and makes the point that it’s not really about Republicans versus Democrats, but about limited government versus unlimited government.

A must read for anyone who has heard about libertarianism but doesn’t really know what it means.
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33 of 36 people found the following review helpful
‘Don't Hurt People and Don't Take Their Stuff’ written by Matt Kibbe and as called by the author himself, may be considered as a Libertarian Manifesto.

The author at the very beginning inserted a nice quote from Friedrich Hayek that speaks about libertarian term which is increasingly used in US these days - “…in the United States, where it has become almost impossible to use “liberal” in the sense in which I have used it, the term “libertarian” has been used instead. It may be the answer; but for my part I find it singularly unattractive. For my taste it carries too much the flavor of a manufactured term and of a substitute. What I should want is a word which describes the party of life, the party that favors free growth and spontaneous evolution. But I have racked my brain unsuccessfully to find a descriptive term which commends itself.”

Kibbe asks himself and reader what is the best way to get United States back on track – do people still believe in the freedom of the individuals to determine their lives and pass obstacles cooperating with others or in the stronger but impersonal government that should be left to care about the things and resolve them in a way that is considered the best. According to author it seems that America society has reached a tipping point where what Washington thinks compared to what each person right to think is best for her/him went into a complete discrepancy.

Though Kibbe honestly said that doesn’t consider himself a moral philosopher and actually doesn’t want to become one, in ‘Don't Hurt People and Don't Take Their Stuff’ he provides good discussion about movement that will help you to take your life back into your own hands, because really at the end of the day it does not matter what the politicians think, but whether we are satisfied with our small world, whether we managed to pay the bills, have you anything to eat, can we afford our children at least some of those things that our parents afforded to us when we were kids…

In his manifesto of libertarian movement he fervently advocates human rights and freedom, explaining how freedom of thought cannot be expected to be brought by someone else, but only us. And for this purpose Kibbe offers six simple tips that although seem a bit silly, such as don’t take people’s stuff and mind your own business, the more you think of them you will more realize they are the right path to go.

Although I’m familiar with author previous works, primarily ‘Hostile Takeover, with this one Matt Kibbe manages to strip naked his subject to the end, stating important things about human rights that exceed fierce political divisions. Or at least this is my opinion.

In any case, ‘Don't Hurt People and Don't Take Their Stuff’ is a good and different book on politics to read, which makes you think. And hopefully act.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 2014
I'm not sure what I expected, but I heard the author discussing this book and decided to see if I found it interesting. More political philosophy than I expected, but still very readable. This author is very much outside the traditional Democratic/Republican debate over how to fund pet projects at the expense of the other side's pet projects. Kibbe focuses on the proper role of government, and the danger of ever growing and incomprehensible bureaucratic structure and regulatory schemes that destroy personal freedom. Both Liberals and Conservatives will find things they like in this book. Progressives not so much.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on April 1, 2014
I keep hearing the word 'libertarian' being tossed about, but no one really explains what that means. Kibbe got right to the point in explaining the fault lines in conservative politics today. On one side is the old guard dinosaurs fighting to keep the broken system afloat for one more election cycle, on the other are the new generation of leaders like Mike Lee, Rand Paul, and Ted Cruz. For all we hear about the Republican party needing to evolve or die, Kibbe makes a strong argument for back to the basics, common sense conservatism: don't hurt people and don't take there stuff. Its the golden rule for politics. If you want to get a preview on where the Republican party will be in five years, Kibbe will give you a sneak peak.
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful
on April 3, 2014
I finished this book in two days, I couldn't put it down. Kibbe makes a compelling case for the libertarian creed; describing the Non-Aggression Principle in its clearest form: Don't hurt people, and don't take their stuff.

This book should be read by all conservatives and anyone who talks about limited government. The book uses contemporary examples to describe how giving government the power to do one thing inevitably leads to the government doing more things. That's the whole point of the American experiment - don't give government that power!

More importantly, it's a call to action. Americans wouldn't have to be worried about government encroachments in their lives if everyone followed this simple motto: don't hurt people. Don't take their stuff.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on April 3, 2014
The Democrats say the Tea Party is a risk to National Security. The Republicans say they are going to "Crush" the Tea Party. The Libertarians say they are both crazy. Read the book. It's "terrible" in its simplicity and dead nuts on in its accuracy. A must for anyone who has been, is, or will be subject to Government confiscatory practices.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on April 13, 2014
Just got it yesterday, already reading. Hard to put down. I had heard that it was an easy read. It is! It flows well, easy to understand, keeps you interested.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 2014
Great read. Really gives you something to think about. A book for the times were living in. Very easy reading.
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