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Don't Let Me Be Lonely: An American Lyric Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Graywolf Press; First Edition edition (August 26, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1555974074
  • ISBN-13: 978-1555974077
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 5.6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #29,208 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"...Offers a staggering record of a response to the media before and after 9/11." -- —NYFA

"Striking out from ground zero, [Rankine] still sees territory for lighting. I say let’s go." -- —Bridge Online

"Unabashedly, startlingly, successfully partakes of this contemporary combination of turbulence and torpor. It’s consuming to read, engulfing. Raw." -- —Pleiades

About the Author

Claudia Rankine is the author of three collections of poetry: Nothing in Nature Is Private, The End of the Alphabet, and Plot. She teaches at the University of Georgia.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Thus, is the brilliance of this poetry collection.
Hector Carbajal
Rankine uses the prose-poem format and scatters images around the book, which I find entertains and lends itself to a certain philosophy-driven format that I like.
Ian Gazarek
I ended up reading the whole thing in one sitting and can't wait to go through it again.
M.W.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Hector Carbajal on April 16, 2005
Format: Paperback
Image and word shape a unique poetry collection that only Rankine can deliver. The shape of this book initially drew my attention. However, I was not necessarily attracted to the book's front cover. Nevertheless, the selected photographs throughout the collection fit perfectly with the political nature of some of the poems.

The book itself has no index, thus making the entire structure of the book unconventional, a word describing Rankine's vision of America in all its "darkness." I would like to believe that the author intended for readers to read all of the poems as one (considering that there is no index), thus making a linear reading mandatory. However, I read pieces of some of the poems, especially the lists, without specific care.

The photographs grabbed me by the throat. For example, the photograph accompanying the poem on page 117 shocked me. Nelson Mandela wears an "HIV Positive" shirt. The image made me think about the labels used in reference to HIV/AIDS. His smile and the two words, printed on his shirt, spoke loud.

I would like to believe that each of the poems reshapes the way we see paragraph form. The use of illustrations and lists disrupt the linear or "organized" way in reading these prose poems. As reader, I find myself conflicted by reading these poems. I am lost in a sense and I want that completion to be there in my whole/complete/unified reading. The poems on page 99 and 100, for example, create that tension. Thus, the use of dialogue, lines, prose pieces and images create a cross-flow of interventions, which I read as subversive.

I love this poetry collection because it has given me the courage to experiment more with my prose poetry. I also love it because it uses images to radically critique and, perhaps, heal.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By M.W. on December 7, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I just got this book on a friend's recommendation and thought that I would glance through it before going to sleep but I couldn't put it down. I ended up reading the whole thing in one sitting and can't wait to go through it again. It is so beautifully written and complex and moving. It is not like a typical poety book in that it is structured more like essays but the essays blend together and fold into one another. It is like poetry in that the choice of words and phrases makes the work very emotionally charged and, well, I know this is a corny word, but I would say profound. It really is a work of art.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Anya on September 27, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book for a poetry workshop I had joined on a whim (I'm not a poet, nor am I really all that familiar with the works of modern poets), and it completely changed the way I thought of poetry. Rankine's book is beautiful, accessible and a chilling portrait of what it's like to be an American in a post-9/11 world. It's hard to describe, really, what kind of book this is -- but poetry, memoir, documentary, whatever, it's fantastic.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on October 24, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
So, I'm going to have to begin by prefacing that I almost never review books of poetry despite my writing and reading poetry as a career and for fun. However, this book is so amazing because it introduces a multi-genre collection that does not feel highly-stylized or pretentious. What you end up with is a masterpiece that is both smart, and sad, and lonely, and informative of what it means to be alive, truly alive. I recommend this book especially if you are someone who is interested in books that defy genres and do it well.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Dick on June 26, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is one of the books that defines our times. Greatly humourous and pleasantly dark in that ache to release you into the way you know personally, it's a book that comes to us and makes us say "oh, yes, that's it, exactly"--Personal, political, TV culture, taking lunch with a friend, reading a book, sitting up nights with insomnia, reaching out or wanting to learn to again reach out through the divides that silence us, bar us within our American apartments, border us inside of our familiar yet often dreary patterns, make us wary of change, exception, risk, thus creating risk, enmity, division and the loneliness we are so wanting not to face. Rankine's deftly-written prose-poem-political-poetics-essay collection challenges notions of poem, of self, of genres, of culture as she embodies in these smartly written sections through her mobile pronoun use, her pop culture references, her reflections on self and other, the way we need to put out a hand and take the risk of reaching towards another even before they reach out to us: before being loved, to love. How necessary! I simply want to thank her for reminding me of this as I go back and back and back into these pages, always finding more there, deeper.
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By Mr. Books on March 13, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great writing. A definition of the lyric essay at its best. It deals with race, 9/11, disease, and of course what it's like to be extremely lonely with just a static TV appearing throughout these pages. She's a poet of great perception and feeling. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in good writing about our times.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is not easy to read. Mostly it is not easy because it is so honest. Sometimes it is not easy because it asks the reader to follow painful, demanding questions and conditions. But it is wonderfully written and it does the reader true service.
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