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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars New & Improved!
There has been a noticeable shift in technology design - it's all about us - the users! In light of this change, Steve Krug has updated his bestselling guide to web usability. As he says himself, "The basic principles are the same even if the landscape has changed, because usability is about people and how they understand and use things, not about technology. And while...
Published 14 months ago by Mary Wendell

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars focused on usability testing
It is a good introduction book about UX. It covers usability testing well. I just which it had more layout examples and more in depth covering of mobile.
Published 11 months ago by Percival Lucena


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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars New & Improved!, January 3, 2014
This review is from: Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (3rd Edition) (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
There has been a noticeable shift in technology design - it's all about us - the users! In light of this change, Steve Krug has updated his bestselling guide to web usability. As he says himself, "The basic principles are the same even if the landscape has changed, because usability is about people and how they understand and use things, not about technology. And while technology often changes quickly, people change very slowly."

His core common sense approach remains the same, but with all the new devices that people are interacting with these days, the competitiveness of a product relies on how easy it is to use. You could pay for a professional like Krug to determine how usable your product is, if you can afford it. But even then, it's important to learn the principles yourself so you know whether the person you hire is considering and addressing the right issues. Happily, this book practices what it preaches, it's written in a friendly chatty way and well designed. In short, this great book goes down easy.

I've come across a lot of design books in my time and several in my last year while pursuing a higher education in graphic design - including a personal favorite The Practice of Creativity: A Manual for Dynamic Group Problem-Solving, which Krug strongly endorses in a previous edition's "Recommended Reading". It would have been so great to have this book at my disposal while I was studying website design because the information is so well organized. For my classes I was provided Peachpit software books, which I found a little hard to follow for being too text heavy. If you are going to educate on design principles, you should follow similar rhetoric. Krug's book organizes information in color, in tables, and often have entertaining illustrations.

These new chapters make the new book a must-buy:

Chapter 7 - Big Bang Theory of Web Design
Chapter 10 - Mobile: It's Not Just a City in Alabama
Chapter 13 - Guide for the Perplexed: Making usability happen when you live
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 Hour Read Full of Useful Information and Practical Tips, January 17, 2014
By 
Melissa Eggleston (Durham, North Carolina) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (3rd Edition) (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
I read the book pretty fast, as I knew I would since the first one was a quick read as well. I've been waiting for it to come, especially since I had to speak at a tech conference a few weeks ago on "What We Know About Your Website Users."

I read it in three chunks, 30 minutes, then 1 hour on the treadmill walking and another hour on the treadmill today. I nearly injured myself only once when I dropped the book. So, in 3 hours or less, someone can learn a lot of important issues to consider about the making or redesign of a website!

I'm familiar with the older edition as it was required reading in grad school. Friends regularly ask me to look at their sites and usually the suggestions I make for improvement originate from usability guidelines in this book. Sometimes I get them to go buy it, and they come back to me with gratitude.

It's especially a great book for small business owners and soloprenuers who can't spend much money for web help. It would also be very helpful for anyone thinking about doing mobile usability testing - he covers the issues and challenges with that.

I really like the updated examples in this edition - they are great. Generally I felt like I had learned most, not all, of the information from the first book and that class in grad school. However, I by no means remember to use all the principles so it was great to review and think about things I need to change on my own website and for the sites I'm in the process of making now for others.

The mobile chapter was really what I was eager to see to learn some new things. I wanted an easy answer like "responsive is the way to go!" - and, understandably, that's not what's there since its about tradeoffs and not black and white (darn it!). But Krug did really raise my awareness of mobile design choices. For example, being conscious about the use of flat design and not just doing it because it is trendy, making sure buttons are still clear, etc. He hits on affordances/visual signals. Terrific mobile examples as well.

I wanted more on mobile, but I understand technology is in flux right now so we'll have to see how it all plays out. Krug does make some comments about the mobile first movement and responsive design.

(Hey Steve Krug, maybe you could write an entire book just about mobile usability? I'd buy it!)

The footnotes made me laugh or smile. I like the personal nature they give the book. Also the photos, tables, cartoons, and illustrations break up the text and make it more manageable. I like that I can pick up the book, flip to a page and read a chunk of info that I may be able to use immediately - like the advice around breadcrumbs.

I particularly liked Chapter 11 "Usability as Common Courtesy."

All in all, I find Krug to be very giving with information and resources. The jimmy rigging of a camera setup for $30 for mobile usability testing is an example.

Krug makes usability accessible for regular folks. This also should make us more responsible for considering users when making websites.

I know the websites I make will be better because I read this book.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Most usable book about web usability in 3rd edition, interesting and useful to read, January 17, 2014
Steve Krug is back with 3rd edition of "Don't Make Me Think", a bit different web design book than readers are used to find on the market.

It all starts with the misleading title because after reading it you will certainly spend some time thinking about ideas presented inside, about quality improve quality of web site you already have or creating a new one using numerous tips author provided.
For the most part this book is actually more a presentation and a picture book than the usual design book but it's great because using pictures and examples of what is good and what is not the author is sending best messages.

Therefore, you can be sure that after reading/viewing it you'll have at least several new ideas how to improve usability of your website understanding your user better - what they like and what they don't and how the regular user is browsing through the Internet.
Web usability is feature about many web designers don't think enough or not at all resulting in websites that are maybe nice or full of information but unusable.

Although his previous edition was published almost 8 years ago, it was still the recommended read for any web designer or enthusiast, to learn some useful tricks and get some tips for making or upgrading good website.
But as author said the world and Internet have changed a lot, due to the technology rapid development, the web itself kept improving and usability became mandate, not an advantage. But most importantly his previous edition felt dated.
Therefore Krug went throughout the book, updated all the information, deleted what belongs to the past and added three completely new chapters - Big Bang Theory of Web Design, Mobile: It’s Not Just a City in Alabama and Guide for the Perplexed: Making usability happen when you live. The obtained result not only justifies a new edition, but certainly would become the new standard for the next few years in terms of web usability.

The book starts with introducing of several guiding principles, followed by design patterns and tools that would be helpful for improving website efficiency. Throughout the book the author still insists on usability testing and book excels on this field due to many examples that are illustrating where and how the actual websites were enhanced.
Steve Krug insists on simplicity and his advices are clear as soon as you read them such as “…It should be very clear what is clickable” or “…get rid of half the words, then get rid of half of what's left”, or his famous "Trunk test" - if you've been blindfolded and locked in a car trunk, you should be able to answer several questions about a site immediately when your blindfold is removed.
Using numerous examples with existing websites author is going beyond just design issues, discussing other elements needed to make a usable and pleasant site for browsing.

So if you've previously read this fantastic manual purchase of new edition can be definitely recommend due to useful and numerous updates, and if didn’t you can be sure that this is one of the top five books on web design topic that you will ever read. In addition to being endlessly informative, thanks to the charm of the author it's also funny and easy to read that makes you read it from cover to cover.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Common sense, but the book organizes it, January 29, 2014
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Yes, all of his interface design comments are fairly well known and understood. You could probably come up with them if you had a lot of time and reviewed many good (and bad) websites for examples. But why go through that effort? King organizes all of the important elements of web design and clearly discusses them. The examples are excellent and his writing style is straightforward and easy to read. The book is great as a refresher for experienced designers as well as novices. Highly recommended!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Before you write one word, choose one color, or size one image, read this book., March 8, 2014
By 
Mark Myers (Beautiful Taos, NM) - See all my reviews
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I don't think it's going too far to say that the most important issue in website design is usability. And here, my friends, is the bible of usability. Krug is wise, clear, persuasive, and funny. His years of work in the field are apparent throughout. His humanity is a nice bonus. He correctly asserts that a well-designed website is a gesture of kindness as well as a commercial plus.

I was in the advertising business for 30 years, and was something of a direct-response expert, so I was confident that I could design an effective landing page. Have you read Dunning and Kruger's "Unskilled and Unaware of It"?

Unfortunately, I designed my website before reading the book. But the day after I finished reading, I started to rework everything. The new site is going to go live in a few weeks. There isn't a single thing I didn't change.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Steve Krug has done a great job of organizing key questions by which to evaluate ..., July 5, 2014
By 
Daniel W. Spink (englewood cliffs, n.j. United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (3rd Edition) (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
Steve Krug has done a great job of organizing key questions by which to evaluate the usability of start up (or existing) website. His experience shows in his concise summary of practical questions and advice. My only complaint (sent to Steve via email) is the really awful feckless and pointless book he recommends on p.188 for some unknown reason: i.e., Influence: The Psychology Of Persuasion. If he removed that one mistake, I would give his book 5 stars.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should Be Required Reading For Anyone Who Designs or Implements A Web Site!, March 5, 2014
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This review is from: Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (3rd Edition) (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
Congress should pass a law that will not allow a website to be set up unless the person designing the site has read this book at least twice. Seriously.

This book helped me make a few changes to my web site that tripled my traffic and sales. Not to mention it made my web site far less cluttered and much easier to use.

healthcare.gov take note....
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book makes you think, February 13, 2014
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A well-written, clever and witty book that anyone building, or hoping to build, web sites should read. It doesn't make a huge number of points, but it doesn't have to--only the really important ones. The author avoided making this a ponderous tome, and God bless him. By the end of the book, the reader has absorbed in different ways the author's main points. It's a nice read and I highly recommend it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simple and complete, January 30, 2014
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This book is essential for everyone who is developing user interfaces of any kind (not only web). It delivers just exactly what you need to improve your work.
Pretty easy to read and understand.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Steve found a way to make a great book even better!!!, March 5, 2014
This review is from: Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (3rd Edition) (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
It's hard to find any short-comings of what basically should be the first UX book anyone reads (2/ed sold over 400,000 copies and was translated in 20+ languages). However, if I had to point two out things with 2/ed, they would be #1 that some of the examples were getting less relevant (many of the website examples just aren't around anymore or look totally different) and #2 that it seemed to focus mainly on web-based sites/apps. Steve addresses both of these in the 3/ed.

Krug has a very rare and unique gift to explain complex ideas and concepts succinctly with good dose of humour. The whole book is only 200 pages (compare with Alan Cooper's About Face 3/ed which is 648 pages and it's supposed to be only the "essentials" on IxD). It truly is short enough "...to read on a long plane ride" as intro says and quite entertaining.

One of the strengths of 3/ed is chp 10, 20 pages on "Mobile: it's not just a city in Alabama anymore". Steve makes some great metaphors, like comparing mobile websites to shrinking a 8.5x11 sheet of paper into postage stamp. This book gives the readers insights that took many of us 15+ years of developing mobile apps to learn (the *hard* way). Also the concepts of affordances and understanding that interfaces don't have cursors is often overlooked. While important for phones and tablets I think they are also just as relevant for non-mobile platforms such as touch-screens devices, kiosks terminals and embedded displays/systems as well.

If you're new to UX or you're a non-UX'er (PM, Dev, QA, Docs, etc) and you're looking to get better acquainted with Usability, I strongly suggest you start with this book. If you've already bought the 1/ed or 2/ed I'd still propose it's worth it just for new mobility chapter (you might have to wait another 9 years i you are holding out for a 4/ed). I've given a number of talks on UX and Usability and I have based a lot of them on concepts from this and It's Not Rocket Surgery. Both are excellent resources.
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