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Don't Make No Waves...Don't Back No Losers: An Insiders' Analysis of the Daley Machine Paperback – September 22, 1976


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Don't Make No Waves...Don't Back No Losers: An Insiders' Analysis of the Daley Machine + Boss:  Richard J. Daley of Chicago
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press (September 22, 1976)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0253202027
  • ISBN-13: 978-0253202024
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,115,798 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Anderson on August 27, 2000
Format: Paperback
An excellent analysis of Chicago politics and government under Richard J. Daley Sr. Describes the underpinnings of "machine" government from the perspective of classic political theory, emphasizing the strengths of its democratic process while acknowledging the negative impact on those who were disenfranchised under Daley's system (principally African-Americans and "reformers".) Best read with Mike Royko's "Boss: Richard J. Daley of Chicago," for two well-written and well-reasearched contrasting views. (Also check out Robert Caro's "The Power Broker," about New York's Robert Moses -- probably the best book available on machine-style politics).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K.A.Goldberg on March 19, 2008
Format: Paperback
Political scientist Milton Rakove (1918-1983) from the University of Chicago offers insights into the long reign (1955-1976) of Mayor Richard J. Daley (1902-1976) and the political organization (or machine) that Daley ruled but did not create. This book captures some of the cold-hearted, hard-muscled essence of Chicago ward politics. It also shows the winners and losers in that system, and gives a feel of why certain interests (blacks, reformers) felt left-out. This informative book's slightly stiff academic style may lead some readers to prefer journalistic examinations by Mike Royko (BOSS) and Len O'Connor (CLOUT, REQUIM).

This book was written in 1972 or 1973, when the still-powerful machine was early in its decline. At this writing the machine is far weaker and altered, yet still exists with some potency. Also, from 1979-1989 Chicago had a female and two Black mayors, and since 1989 Daley's son has reigned with support from many (but not all) reformers that once opposed his father.
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By ed hammer on November 30, 2010
Format: Paperback
Business as usual, the Chicago political way. Books likes this should be mandatory reading for anyone who supports or is complacent about the culture of corruption. Another one is "One Hundred Percent Guilty, How and Insider Links the Death of Six Children to the Politics of Illinois Convicted Governor George Ryan" also available on amazon.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Timothy P. Cleary on June 5, 2000
Format: Paperback
Rakove's study of the late 1960's early 1970's Chicago machine is biased due to the fact that he studied the Mafia-controlled 25th ward, thus studying a ward that had a much higher local authority than most wards.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mick B on January 24, 2011
Format: Paperback
Recently I read a number of Daley books, and this is one of the first and probably the best researched. After you read this book, and others, you realize that this book is the source of much of the info used in the other books. The author is a true academic scholar and did a huge amount of research. So the details he found are borrowed by everyone else, sometimes many sentences at a time. But the other books are worth reading. Clout is a good one, as well as the Royko books, since those authors worked as journalists in the city during the Daley years. Daley was the quintessential corrupt big machine Mayor, and this book outlines how he did it. The remarkable thing about the Daley corruption is that he never wanted to be bigger than a Mayor. he never bought a huge mansion in France, never traveled a lot, did not steal tens of millions of dollars, as many politicians do. What he did do was worse. He used his influence, obtained by supporting Kennedy and Johnson, to help create big Federal programs that brought dollars to the city. Every city does this now. Now, decades later, cities are still leaning on the Federal govt to help them pay their bills. The parking meter deal was just the most recent one. A lot of the problems of deficit spending the country has today were caused by Daley's tactics: indeed he created them. Daley gave out jobs and in return for votes promised huge pensions and benefit packages. Today all the big cities and states (virtually all of which are run by Democrats) are now suffering huge deficits. Daley used Fed dollars to save his city for 20 yrs, but today all those promises are due, and no one can afford it. So understanding Daley is an important clue to the tactics used to create our federal deficit problems today.Read more ›
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