Customer Reviews


7 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A MUST READ for everyone, especially those who are job hunting or just collecting a paycheque
"I'm on the job hunt" is a refrain I hear all too often from my friends, who are in their late 20s and 30s. On the university campus where I currently work, I see far too many young, ambitious graduates settling for jobs that neither utilize their skills or develop their potential. It's disheartening for me, even though I am one of the 'lucky ones' because I have a job,...
Published on October 9, 2012 by Shannon Courtney

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting ideas, poor editing
The ideas were thought-provoking but the editing was poor and, at times, presented a barrier to the flow of reading.
Published on December 1, 2012 by ALS


Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The start of what should be a great series, October 11, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: You Don't Need a Job (The Rise of the Network Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
Rob is planning an ambitious series investigating the impact of thinking about our society as a network rather than a machine. I'm fully behind this idea, as it informs much of my own research. And Rob does an excellent job of taking findings from the natural and social sciences and thinking through their potential impacts. This first book looks at the world of work through this lens.

The basic premise is that the world as we know it is currently changing due to a combination of the emergence of new technologies, the need for sustainability, and the current set of financial crises facing us. The implications for work are that we can achieve many things now through activating a network of acquaintances and supporters that previously required more formal institutions. In other words, we no longer need to have a job working for someone to get by.

While I'm highly sympathetic to Rob's project, there are parts of the book that I don't agree with. This is good though - it's definitely a though-provoking piece of work. One question that I think will need to be addressed as the series progresses concerns the role of expertise. One of the basic premises of this model is that we now have access to all of the information and tools that we need to do many things ourselves that previously required experts. We can educate ourselves, manage for our own retirement, and construct our own work. But can we do all of it? I still think there will be important roles for people that have developed skills in particular areas more fully than others have been able to.

This is an optimistic book, and well worth reading for anyone that is looking for a job, or thinking about the work that they're doing on a day-to-day basis. Everyone should have work that is fulfilling, and some of the ideas in this book might help you achieve this for yourself.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A MUST READ for everyone, especially those who are job hunting or just collecting a paycheque, October 9, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: You Don't Need a Job (The Rise of the Network Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
"I'm on the job hunt" is a refrain I hear all too often from my friends, who are in their late 20s and 30s. On the university campus where I currently work, I see far too many young, ambitious graduates settling for jobs that neither utilize their skills or develop their potential. It's disheartening for me, even though I am one of the 'lucky ones' because I have a job, albeit on a contract basis, with the constant threat that funding will run out. Us young people have been taught throughout our childhood and young adulthood that the ticket to success is a university degree and the ticket to a secure life is a job. Well, here we are, all grown-up and well-educated and ready to take on the world. But the world is changing and many of us cannot find a place in the old world that we've been shaped for. Many of us feel lost and alone and, quite frankly, afraid for our futures.

Never underestimate the power of words to transform. 'You Don't Need Job' is
a MUST READ for anyone under 35 and anyone over 35 that doesn't feel like they 'fit' in the old, dying world of jobs. Robert Paterson provides guidance to those that seek it on how to be a part of the new 'new world'. It is hopeful, yet grounded. It is what so many of us need to hear. At a time when all the news reports are focused on unemployment rates, austerity and recessions, there is a new world awakening where each of us can be in charge of our own destiny, where each of us can utilize our many different skills to create multiple income streams, where each of us can be a benefactor of our capabilities and integrity (for in the networked world, your reputation means more than your age, lineage or formal education). Please read the introduction, I know you'll be hooked by the second page.

I, for one, am getting geared up to be a pioneer of the new world and am filled with excitement at the prospects that lie ahead. I hope that many of my peers will read this book, for we are the ones caught between the old world and the new one, and Rob Paterson provides us with a map to the new world. It is up to us, then, to set sail!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Rise of the Networked Gig Economy, October 7, 2012
This review is from: You Don't Need a Job (The Rise of the Network Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
Rob Paterson offers us a very useful book, You Don't Need a Job (The Rise of the Network). Of course, he does not mean you don't need an income but there are others ways to earn an income that a salaried job with an employer. Instead he is talking about what I have been doing since 2004 and an increasing number of others are doing. You can work for yourself as a contractor on multiple projects, initiatives, assignments, or other gigs. Some people started this way to earn a living because they lost their job, others, like Rob, started it because they wanted a change.

Rob has an interesting chart that shows that in the early 1800s over 80% of people earned their living as free agents. After the industrial revolution took hold, the number dropped well below 20%. Now it is back over 40% as free agency is growing once again in the networked world. The focus has shifted from top-down command and control hierarchies to networks of skilled participants. This change is even happening within companies and those that adopt it will be the leaders of the next economy. Rob's book provides some very useful historical context so we can see how we got to where we are now and how we can progress beyond it.

I recently re-watched an excellent video produced by the BBC in 1997, Intellectual capital: The New Wealth of Nations. The film portrayed the industrial revolution as a plague on people where workers were treated as mere extensions of machines. Charles Handy makes the same point as Rob, when the workers own the means of production they will be in control. But unlike Karl Marx, Handy was talking about the machines but the intellectual assets within people's minds that provides them flexibility to move from company to company or become free agents.

Corresponding to this change is the rise of the percentage of enterprise wealth driven from intangible assets. Now the percentage of tangible assets in the corporations in the S&P 500 has shifted from 66% in 1982 to 16% in 1999 and likely continues to fall (see Juergen Daum, Intangible Assets and Value Creation). In its place is the rise of intangible assets as the creators of wealth (over 84% in 1999). These are mostly the ideas in people's minds. Yet many organizations are still managing people as though the wealth was created by tangible assets, machines, and people are just servants of these machines. It is the network within and outside the enterprise that releases this potential for wealth. Now, as Rob, argues, the network increasingly allows you to do not need an enterprise to create a living. It is increasingly possible to escape the yoke of top down authority by simply working as a free agent.

Moving form historical context, Rob offers a lot if practical advise on how to survive and prosper in the new networked world. You can join a community of free agents to share possibilities and collaborate on work. There are Web sites that support this networking. You can turn a hobby into a living. You can learn something new. He offers a number of useful sources to further your ability to thrive in this new world. I highly recommend the book, whether you are inside or outside an organization. It contains survival skills for all of us.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting ideas, poor editing, December 1, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: You Don't Need a Job (The Rise of the Network Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
The ideas were thought-provoking but the editing was poor and, at times, presented a barrier to the flow of reading.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars The future of work, October 25, 2012
By 
J. S. Wilson (Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: You Don't Need a Job (The Rise of the Network Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
Rob has done a good job of looking at what the future of work might involve in the not to distant future.

This text is a very quick and quite enjoyable read.

I like how Rob has presented links to other sources of material that can be read separately or to accompany this thesis.

While I didn't agree with everything he talked about - many of his ideas are presented solidly and build much many other concepts which will be elaborated upon in future books.

The biggest conceptual area I struggled with was the central network aggregators who would help to distribute work out to people who in essence freelanced. The issue I have is not one that they will exist - it is rather that are we replacing one form of centralization (the corporation) with another (network aggregator - ie. the BnB website Rob mentions)... and why is this occurring - and who then profits by it - are we exchanging one master for another - and is it simply a way that work can be commoditized further - and done cheaper as the costs are downloaded upon the freelancer (eg. real estate, benefits, etc.) so that the consumer benefits. Will this aggregation then lead to further centralization of control in fewer and fewer hands.

I am very much looking forward to reading many of Robs upcoming books.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars New ideas, October 18, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: You Don't Need a Job (The Rise of the Network Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
Searching for answers these days for a better societal order is something that should concern all of us. No idea should be discarded when people coming together is the end result. Rob has certainly introduced some thought provoking ideas that not only cause us to think about our way of doing things, but also suggests what is to come. I like the notion of networks, more people with people, and Rob has given us much to think about in this regard. I would hope that more people read this book and find their own ways to improve how things get done. I will watch for the next in this series.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Rob Paterson at his best. Great insight., October 7, 2012
This review is from: You Don't Need a Job (The Rise of the Network Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
Rob Paterson has been writing for a very long time and it is clear that this book is a synthesis of decades of thought about the state of jobs today and in the future.

Great book. Kindle is a perfect way to read extended essays.

Buy it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.