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91 of 92 people found the following review helpful
Doodle Quilting has no photos of finished samples except for the cover and 3 or 4 pages of doodle ensembles inside the book; it is 99% black-and-white line drawings with supplemental text. So why would I rate it 5 out of 5 stars? And what sets Cheryl Malkowski's new book Doodle Quilting apart from all the other free-form quilting books out there?

Words.

And this is a welcome addition for quilters like me who are left-brainers who benefit from being TOLD - not just SHOWN - how to do something. I like that each drawing has a "think" subtitle, giving the quilter a type of mantra to murmur (or mutter, that happens too) as the fabric (or long-arm) is moved. Some of these are not super-sophisticated ("spiral in, spiral out"), but this verbiage can help unlock those frozen arms or help a newbie break out of the basic meander mode.

Right-brain (or visual) quilters will most certainly pick up a few tips and flourishes from the many black-and-white line drawings here, even if they don't read the text. But I encourage them to read every word here, because none of them are wasted. (By the way, if you are looking for a book with lots of full-color photos of samples, check out Leah Day's 365 Free Motion Quilting Designs.)

My favorite section is the "Ensembles" chapter where doodles get combined together, creating the unique and attractive design featured on the cover. This is a superb way to practice, practice, practice and at the same time create a one-of-a-kind all-over whole-cloth quilt.

Right-brain or left-brain, Doodle Quilting was a no-brainer for me and it was on my wish-list as soon as I saw it was in the works. It works for me because Malkowski gives life to both pictures and words in an encouraging and truly helpful manner.
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32 of 32 people found the following review helpful
on December 30, 2012
I have two quilts that need to be quilted. I came across this book on a Blog that I follow. I ordered it immediately. I use my Pfaff sewing machine for all of my quilting, not a longarm. I like the idea of tracing and then drawing out the designs. I found that by the time I was ready to practice on fabric, it was a very easy transition and didn't require as much practice there as I expected. I used my variation on one of the designs in the book to quilt the sashing in one of my quilts. It was easy and turned out exactly the way I envisioned. I would definitely recommend this book. It has great ideas for background and filler designs.
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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
on December 11, 2012
Doodle Quilting is the best guide for free motion quilting I have ever seen! As a retired teacher I am wildly impressed with Cheryl's teaching skills. She takes the novice from tracing, pen in hand, to a two handed assimulation of the quilting motions needed.

Easy and memorable vocabulary, (Sunshines & Spikeys,) is used to help the learner remember new ideas.

Easy and memorable catagories, (Travelers & Boomerangs,) are used to help the learner store and retrieve these new ideas.

Most impressive is her "Think" prompts under each pattern. (The simple leaf, "Think" --in and back-- make a football.) This technique allows both the right and left brain to work together, which makes successful quilting very likely.

For the experienced quilter she easily addresses the hardest part of free motion quilting, deciding where you are going to stitch next.

This is a Five Star, must have quilting guide.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on January 2, 2013
`Doodle Quilting' by Cheryl Malkowski is a wonderful book for quilters of every age and skill. Malkowski begins with basic stitches and practicing on paper, then advances to multi-stitch designs. Malkowski has included over 120 continuous line designs, meaning you can keep stitching, without having to lift up your needle and start and stop all of the time (at least until your bobbin thread runs out!). There are some stitches that you will find are common in most quilting design books, like stippling, flames and pebbles. Malkowski also includes some very unique patterns, such as intricate roses, and other flowers, but also combinations of stitches, including flowers with leaves, and different types of ferns mixed together. Doodle Quilting also includes the feather, a standard in quilting, but some of her feathers are embellished with pebbles around the feathers, and designs within the feathers that are very unique and fun-looking to quilt out.
Since one of my goals this year is to work on my free-motion quilting skills, this book will be included as one of my learning guides to sew along with. I think this is a really great book to have in your library, whether you are a beginner at free-motion or wanting to get new ideas for your quilts if you are a more advanced quilter!
[...]
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on September 11, 2013
This is a great book. I ordered it on-line and it is wonderful, creative, well written and will work for everyone. Unless you buy the Kindle edition! The point of the book is to trace the examples over and over again until you can do them naturally. Can't do that on a Kindle in the way you should do it to make it work. Buy the book, just not for your Kindle!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on May 23, 2013
Just downloaded the Kindle edition of this book to my iPad 2 the other day. Since it claimed most of the book was instructional text and black and white line drawings-- figured I would not be disappointed. It downloaded easily to my iPad and I have already read some of the instructions -- which really make a lot of sense. Since I do not have a printer attached to my iPad, I just traced my finger over the quilting patterns and think that may work fine to get my fingers going in the right direction. If I want to try the pencil grip -- I could use a little bamboo drawing tool that works well on the iPad. I haven't tried to download the book to my computer yet. If that works, I could print out the designs too. Also-- I have good reader as an app. It will let you write and draw on PdF files. Don't know if this will download into Good Reader or not. Has anyone tried this?
But all, in all, this is a very helpful book as a primer to simple free motion quilting. I really like the instructions to train your motor skills and I like the way she has you combine simple designs to make more complex designs. I'm sure I'll be able to quilt many of these designs :)
It was really nice to be able to download this book immediately and to have it in this portable format :)
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on November 28, 2012
This is a lovely book if you are a beginner free motion quilter, looking for different ideas in terms of fillers and fun shapes. There is some basic instruction and advice for how to sew into the design and sew out again. However, I was quite disappointed by the lack of photographs of actual quilting on quilts, demonstrating how motifs are combined across an entire quilt top. Of the two interior full page photos of finished quilting, one is the cover photo of a whole cloth top and the second is another whole cloth top. The rest of the book is line drawings of the motifs, of which there are quite a number. Again, this book is suited to beginners and would be an excellent addition to a guild library or public library.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on March 23, 2013
This book does not have colored photos or fancy terms. Instead this book offers easy and simple to understand direction with black and white drawings to explain free motion machine drawing. The author shows the starting point, direction and flow of the stitches. You could use this for machine or hand stitching ideas. You could adjust the size, direction, fill or what ever you need to make beautiful quilts, pillows, throws, etc. The flow directions are large and easy to follow. She offers a method on how to get the feel of the flow before trying it on the machine. This book is very adequate and well constructed.

I do not rate a book on the way it was shipped to me, the packaging or a problem with the vendor. I rate only the book, the work of the author and what I get from it that will inspire me or help me to learn a new method on my sewing or craft. I have been sewing on a machine since the summer of 1959 when I was 10 years old. I have made wedding dresses, the wedding parties dresses, mens' suits, nearly all of my daughters' and son's clothing until they were older and I had to buy them, along with countless items I make and sell at craft shows. I am now retired from my 40 hour a week job. I own 10 machines that all do different things. After 53 years of sewing, I am just now getting around to becoming more experienced in free motion quilting and thread painting. This book is a great starting point for the free motion adventure and I am more than satisfied with it. I have a what is getting to be a very large library of sewing and crafting books. I don't keep books that don't offer what is truely relevant. In fact I am sending two back now that I am just not happy with and would be of no service to me. This is a keeper to me and I would recommend it to some one just learning free motion quilting.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on February 6, 2014
You have to know the alphabet before you can write words. You have to be able to draw before you can create a complex design. This book teaches you how to draw the simple building block patterns of free-motion quilting designs and then combine them into progressively more complex units. The author recommends tracing the patterns. I traced over the patterns with a blunt stylus then practiced the patterns on a small, 8x10" whiteboard I bought at a local office supply store. I doodled off and on, a few minutes at a time, every evening while watching TV. I found even the simplest forms extremely difficult at the beginning (zero experience drawing) but suddenly, after a month, I realized I was drawing the early forms easily and consistently. I'm still doodling on my whiteboard in the evenings, but I'm becoming more comfortable with the forms and enjoying combining them into my own designs. And, when I look at complex forms on free-motion quilts, I'm not overwhelmed by the complexity because I can break the design apart into its component forms and see how it was constructed. I've watched a lot of YouTube videos and read several books, but this is the best learning tool I've encountered because it starts with the design alphabet of free motion quilting..
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on October 2, 2013
For a beginner and for those who want to learn techniques of free-motion quilting/drawing, this is wonderful. Clear explanation, very explanatory illustrations. Terrific exercises to do with pens and paper. Makes the transition from paper to machine very easy. Gives confidence to go for it.
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