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Dorkismo: the Macho of the Dork Paperback – August 10, 2009

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Review

In her book, Dorkismo: The Macho of the Dork, cultural critic Maria Bustillos compares the important people in a variety of fields and has come up with the following conclusion: They were all dorks. By dork, Bustillos means people who have the capacity to be themselves no matter what anyone thinks and do so with pride and self-confidence. If a corporate lawyer adores the cutesy Hello Kitty and is OK with that, he's a dork and maybe even wears Hello Kitty cuff-links. Dorkismo is Stephen Colbert taking out his 12-sided die on The Colbert Report, and David Foster Wallace admitting he bawled like a baby over The Bridges of Madison County. It's also fans writing about their love of Natalie Portman and people on message boards rhapsodizing about Pepperidge Farm Goldfish jingles.

Bustillos marries high-brow and low-brow in this cross-disciplinary text, and her delightfully breezy and intelligent writing will make readers want to shed their armor of irony and embrace their dorkiness. --hipsterbookclub.com, August 9, 2009

"I must mention that [this] book, Dorkismo: the Macho of the Dork, is pure gold. Don't just grab it for the [David Foster Wallace] chapter (good as it is) but for the celebration of everything that is dork." --Nick Maniatis --The Howling Fantods, September 7, 2009

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 220 pages
  • Publisher: Accidental Books (August 10, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0615256171
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615256177
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,639,243 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Maria Bustillos is the author of "Dorkismo: the Macho of the Dork" and "Act Like a Gentleman, Think Like a Woman." She lives in Los Angeles, and can be contacted at dorkismo@gmail.com.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Katherine Kasserman on July 9, 2009
Format: Paperback
Beyond saying "yuppers!" to previous reviewers' comments (I was lucky enough to read an advance copy of Dorkismo), I'd like to add a few thoughts about what makes this such an excellent, and necessary, book. Okay, on a fundamental level, the act of saying, "I like this/I do not like this" has a meaningful social component: it situates you (generally) with similarly minded souls. And that's not a bad thing -- but it can become one, easily, and all too often does, when the "I don't like this so we don't like this" element takes over, and what started out as a cheerful group of enthusiasts degenerates into a fascism of turning up one's nose at...well, just about everything. We find ourselves trapped in a simultaneous tyranny of the majority *and* the minority, where nothing is acceptable and everything we actively LIKE puts us at risk. So why like anything?

Not liking anything is about the worst thing that can happen to anyone.

So in charges Dorkismo on a white horse! YES, it is okay to like things, from iceberg lettuce to Ulysses, and in any combination. The importance lies in -- and the focus should be on -- what we GENUINELY value, not what we think other people are going to think about what we think (and so on ad infinity of reflections and counter-reflections). By saying what really matters to YOU (be it ever so klutzy, weird, or rarefied), and taking a live-and-let-live approach to people who get all tingly over their own fascinations, you get to be HAPPY...and you help make it easier for other people to be happy too. Sure, saying "no" to things has an important place in the landscape -- but "yes" is in serious danger of being extirpated, one snotty little slice at a time, and that's something we can't live with, and can't afford.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By CJS from Queens on July 12, 2009
Format: Paperback
This is an entertaining, funny, and accessible read - but do not be deceived! Dorkismo touches on several important subjects.
What does it mean to really, truly, follow your own inner path to happiness? What does it really mean to not follow the herd - even when the herd itself is not following the larger herd? Well if you read and embrace the power of Dorkismo it means freedom, happiness, and release from the stultifying strictures of pop-culture, high culture, and the "cool kids," whether it is in school, at the office or anywhere. It means really being comfortable in your own skin, even if you are not the flashiest dresser, or even if you listen to "uncool" music, or have "uncool" hobbies.

Trainspotter? Yeah, so what?

As I said in the first line. This book packs a punch but it isn't a dry and boring read. You will read this both because it is good for you, but because it is good, and fun. As soon as I was finished i started it again. I tell my dork friends about it.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Michael C. Mullen on July 2, 2009
Format: Paperback
Like the best American intellectuals (e.g., Tony Kushner or Mark Twain), Bustillos is less impressed by how smart she is (very!) than by how entertaining it is to think and say. Dorkismo is an intelligent, passionate and witty celebration of open-hearted goofiness (what Henry Fielding might call "benevolence"). There's a lot about "Star Wars", but also a lot about David Foster Wallace, and Bustillos knows how to follow the thread through such disparate topics. In Bustillos' world view, the nemesis of "dorkismo" is crippling self-consciousness of the hip variety. If you've ever experienced such a thing (I could name my own name), then this book is your ticket to liberation, that is to say, self-acceptance. She wants us to love the things we love, without embarrassment, and get our kicks in joy instead of judgment. I say: Read it!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Caswallon S. Barrios on September 27, 2011
Format: Paperback
A book I took an interest in, then forgot about, then - most fortunately - received as a GIFT. The author - how you say? - "walks the walk" in terms of .. doing what she talks about, i.e., loving what she loves and presenting her argument in a congenial style that is neither academic, nor bereft of the sort of close/pointed analysis that, ideally, academic writing should provide. The book is bursting with personality and, well, *personalities* .. folks from the era before "Cultural Studies" became an affaire sérieuse: Mailer in the 50's, Sontag in the 60's, Lester Bangs in the 70's. A beautifully *human* book that - like the Fat Albert program of old - is as (secretly) edifying as it is entertaining.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pete Morin on July 3, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bustillos brings both formidable intellect and rapier wit to the table in examining the cultural zeitgeist of dorkism. Once relegated to being stuffed in the gym locker or pantzed at the pep rally, the dork has earned unparalleled credentials in contemporary times. The new rock stars are not playing with Fenders, they're playing with code. They're not chasing women, they're chasing formulae - and now women are chasing them. If only they knew what to do.

This is the best fifteen bucks I've ever spent. And that includes a litre of Aguardente in the Algarve. I predict Bustillos is back at us in short order with another barrage of pointy-headed thoughts.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bradley Bevers TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 2, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I picked up this book mainly because it has one of the best titles I have seen on any cover. It is an ode to counterculture and all things dorky, so it should be right up my alley . . .

Sadly, I found the chapters inconsistent and poorly organized. Some were useful and interesting, most were skippable. I did add a few books to my wish list reading it, but that's about it. Probably won't be returning to this one. If you are interested in low-culture, read some Chuck Klosterman & David Foster Wallace. Skip this book unless you have already read of all of theirs and just need your dork fix.
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