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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on October 13, 2008
Samantha Waters is a disgrace to the true courtesan. She frames the novel in a way that she grew up in privileged family, and eventually groomed and educated herself to cater to wealthy men's sexual needs. The memoirs were common, and typical. Her italicized text, which revealed her inner voice became both cumbersome, and annoying throughout the entire book. Moreover, she refers to her clients' fantasies as weird and abnormal; certainly not a good attitude. Samantha is blatantly disingenuous and down right rude to her clients. The only saving grace it appears she had throughout her tenure as a sex worker is that she was allegedly attractive. In a vain attempt to appear classy, she puts on a Chanel suit. She speaks condescendingly of other sex workers, stating she can spot a cheap call girl miles away. What is she even doing in their proximity? In her advice chapter, she even states, "never date a trick". All cheap call girl vernacular. An expensive suit does not buy class. Sadly, Ms. Waters never rose to the super stardom of a world class courtesan she self proclaims to have accomplished. In fact, she even ridicules true world class courtesans that venture outside their own zip code. She proclaims to like adventure, yet never rises out of the Silicon Valley or comfortable hotels of San Francisco. Despite her alleged penchant for adventure, it is obvious this woman is afraid of her own inner fears. I advise readers to select the classic, practical, truly adventurous tales from Xaviera Hollander's "The Happy Hooker," and Veronica Monet's "Sex Secrets of Escorts". These women are far more spiritually grounded in their work, educated, and tell more interesting memoirs.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on April 23, 2009
This book is bad bad bad. A chapter in I realized it wasn't a non-fiction book and prepared myself for some entertaining thoughts and insights about a fictional call-girl's escapades. Instead, even the fantasies were cookie-cut from the cheesiest, most stereotypical porn dvds. Let alone the discrepancies in facts, it was just plain boring. Honestly, I really doubt this book was written by a woman. Yuck-straight to the recycling bin-I'm embarassed to have it on my shelf.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
If this is a true story and not fiction, this modern day courtesan's memoir is full of surprises and myth debunking information? The author seems almost too good to be true. She comes from a very well-to-do family in California, she has three college degrees (majoring in criminology) one of which is a law degree or it's a soon-to-be fourth degree since it's only mentioned at the end of the book when she is describing her life after she retired from eight years of being a Dot.com escort. She had decent mainstream careers as a fraud investigator for an insurance agency and as a hotel public relations person. She claims she went into the escort business in Silicon Valley for the adventure and fun of meeting very powerful men who were in the process of changing the world. She's a Republican who voted for Arnold Schwarzenegger for Governor and George Bush for President. She hates the smell of tobacco, doesn't touch drugs, is a health nut and only drinks very, very occasionally. She's a private person; she loves her pets--"a parrot and a kitty"--and now volunteers at animal shelter once a week. She saved and invested almost all of the money she made from escorting and was therefore able to retire in her twenties to continue to live a life of semi-luxury, but based on her own earnings, not her parents wealth. The first two things she bought with her earnings were what every California girl wants--implants. But it took her three attempts to get the right size for her body. The first ones were too small, the second set too large and finally she ended up with 425cc's. She then bought herself "a beautiful gold Chanel watch' and those were they only two extravagant purchases from her working years. Her next big purchase was a house, which was probably her most successful investment with her earnings. The author loved the feeling of saving money and investing wisely, sometimes on tips from her "geeky" Silicon Valley clients, but she was able to avoid the frequent run ups and busts of the Silicon Valley technology world because of her recession-proof business.
As expected in this kind of book, there are lots of strange and rich client encounters described. There is some really erotic sex and group sex described in lovely detail, and there are some fascinating insights into why happily married, rich and powerful men, who love their wives and family, hire the services of an upscale escort. Like the courtesans of legend, being a good listener and conversationalist ranks very high on her client's wish list. She has some advice for women, many of whom she properly describes as gold-digging wives, who really don't want to have sex with their husbands except on rare occasions and then only as a wifely duty. She is an example of one woman who understood that women have all the real power and she knew instinctively how to use it. She was able to keep her secret life secret and run it strictly on sound, fair, honest and honorable business principals. She avoided the temptations of drugs and alcohol, always practiced safe sex (with her trade mark "pink condoms") and didn't allow her choice of careers to destroy her. She probably knows more about men, love and marriage than most marriage councilors or psychologists. Since she came from an upper-middle class family, she didn't fall into the trap of suddenly earning a ton or money and then going crazy spending it like a drunken sailor. This memoir will provide the reader with a different insight into world of a sensitive, upscale professional sex worker. If anything, this woman has her feet so grounded in reality that she would probably be considered boring by some of her freaky competitors. She definitely didn't emerge from the clubbing scene and she passes on some of her intriguing, clear-headed insights into men, relationships, and the continuing sexual revolution. This is the complete opposite of another recent book "The Price: My Rise and Fall As Natalia, New York's #1 Escort" by Natalie McLennan (Check out my review on Amazon, if you wish).
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on April 16, 2008
It is important for every man to be satisfied sexually; at the same time there are some who yearn for excitement and adventure. For some men, sexual satisfaction are often lacking within the confines of traditional marriage or within the boundaries placed upon themselves. In this environment, the lucrative profession of prostitution has thrived. This book paints a sophisticated picture of the business of sexual care-giving. It is written from the point of view of an intelligent and well-educated wowman, who draws upon here varied experiences and insights to dispel the myths surrounding the ancient world of prostitution, which has now entered the modern, "dot-com" age. The book is both educational and entertaining. I highly recommend it.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on January 23, 2009
While one reviewer seemingly has an issue with this author, I think Samantha Waters has done a marvelous job of writing about her career in the sex industry. Her stories are real, and her clients quite interesting. And it is amazing how the Internet has changed the escort business. I also found escort Erica Black's memoir fascinating in her book The Call Girl Actress
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on July 14, 2008
Well written saga of a highly intelligent and courageous young woman. Entertaining and informative.
Thank you Sam W.
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on June 11, 2010
This book literally reads like a trashy romance novel, or fictitious erotica, which it very well could be.

Waters is no author; she is a prostitute - a hooker. She attempts to glamorize prostitution and even goes so far as to suggest that it be legalized and regulated. Umm, What?

There are typographical errors throughout each chapter, demonstrating the lack of care of the author, editor and publisher. The book seems like it was just thrown together and sent out.

The first half finds Ms. Waters so self absorbed that you can not focus on the story, which go from John to John, all of them with hearts of gold of course, with a few notable exceptions. There are constant cutaways into the monologue in her head - very distracting. She makes no mention of the health dangers involved in this line of work, yet somehow she manages to come across as a saint, or at the least - a hooker with a heart of gold. She is apparently doing God's work, or so she would have you believe, all the while servicing up to a dozen men in one day. Seriously? You can't make this stuff up . . . or can you?

On the "Pro" side of the equation, she does tell you how not to be scammed by less-than-scrupulous hookers. People, make no mistake about it: while she may not have ripped off any clients, she is still a hooker, a trick, and a ho, regardless of her self descriptions and shameless attempts to constantly glamorize a shady profession, more of a scam than a profession (BTW, "Attorney" is also a profession . . . )

Sadly, what Waters does not realize, is that her "Clients" (the cheaters/Johns/tricks/etc.) consistently tell her BS like "My wife is a such a caring and loving woman", or "My wife is so great - I love her dearly". This is the same line of reasoning that a teenage boy would use to get a girl into bed, and exactly the things that a grown man (cheating on his wife and most likely suffering from some form of arrested development) will tell a woman just to get her into bed. A woman would say something like "My husband is sooo mean to me (poor little old me)", or "He is abusive and I am scared to leave him". That is the lie that cheating women tell men. So, who is the hero at the end of the day? Waters ends up shamelessly believing her web of lies, feeling like she is some sort of "provider" (her words) of psychological needs; a valuable service to the community. Where is the nearest toilet?

1/5 stars. Avoid.
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The Price: My Rise and Fall As Natalia, New York's #1 Escort
The Price: My Rise and Fall As Natalia, New York's #1 Escort by Natalie McLennan (Hardcover - November 25, 2008)
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