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Double Crossing Paperback – March 25, 2001

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Paperback, March 25, 2001
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"A spectacular twist on the old Iron Curtain escape." -- Library Journal

About the Author

Novelist-journalist Erika Holzer (Cornell, NYU Law), with husband Hank, in the 1960?s represented Ayn Rand?whose mentoring sparked Holzer?s literary career. First novel Double Crossing (Putnam) combines espionage and human rights, earning high praise from Mary Higgins Clark, Phyllis Whitney, Harry Crews. Eye For An Eye, Holzer?s second acclaimed suspense novel, explores vigilantism ? ?an American Clockwork Orange? (Nelson DeMille).

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: iUniverse (March 25, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0595176968
  • ISBN-13: 978-0595176960
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,742,221 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Erika Holzer received her B.S. from Cornell University and her law degree from New York University.

For several years following her admission to the New York bar, she practiced constitutional and appellate law with Henry Mark Holzer. Their clients included Soviet dissidents and defectors, and other lawyers for whom they prepared appellate briefs and Petitions for Certiorari for the Supreme Court of the United States.

One of the Holzer firm's clients (and later friend) was the novelist, Ayn Rand. Because of Rand's literary influence, Erika Holzer switched careers from law to writing.

With Henry Mark Holzer, she co-authored "Aid and Comfort": Jane Fonda in North Vietnam, proving that Jane Fonda's trip to Hanoi during the Vietnam War, and her activities there, constituted constitutional treason.

Again with Henry Mark Holzer, Erika co-authored Fake Warriors: Identifying, Exposing, and Punishing Those Who Falsify Their Military Service. Her other non-fiction writing consists of essays, articles, reviews, political and legal commentary.

In addition, Erika is author of the book Ayn Rand: My Fiction-Writing Teacher: A novelist's mentor-protégé relationship with the author of Atlas Shrugged.

Holzer's most recent short story, Eyewitness, appears in Scout & Engineer, available on Kindle and most other eBook readers and through www.amazon.com.
Author Nelson DeMille has said about Erika Holzer's novel, Eye for an Eye, that it is "a serious and disturbing look at street gangs, urban violence, the criminal justice system, and vigilantism. Erika Holzer, an attorney, has created a plot from what could be any newspaper headline and carried it a step further. Her characters are vividly created, impassioned, and interestingly flawed so that we relate to them. Highly recommended. A sort of American Clockwork Orange."

Holzer's Eye for an Eye became a Paramount Pictures feature film starring Sally Field and Kiefer Sutherland.

Erika Holzer can be contacted at
erika.holzer@erikaholzer.com and through www.erikaholzer.com.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Interplanetary Funksmanship on June 14, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Man's Humanity to Man": It's a line from this riveting Cold War-era novel from Erika Holzer. That line sums up the book's theme, during its climatic chapters. As for the plot, I won't give too much away, save that it's intricately plotted suspense that culminates in a daring escape at the Berlin Wall.

I first read "Double Crossing" in 1984, shortly after it was published, and while stationed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, as an Army private, just turned 19. Coming back to reading it (doing the math, I'm now 42 -- more than two lifetimes of a nineteen year old) I was prepared to find it "dated," because the Berlin Wall fell just five years later, in 1989. At the time of my first reading, I was reading a lot of Robert Ludlum and Ken Follett spy novels, and remembered regarding this book as belonging in the same company.

Yet, upon re-reading, "Double Crossing" was even better this time because it wasn't dated at all, it just aged nicely. Reading a book at 42 is worlds away from reading it at 19, and what struck me this go around was that Holzer took a family saga and wrapped it inside a political spy thriller. At 19, I read it for its plot, but this time I got wrapped up in the personal lives of its characters. Although the particular genre in which Holzer wrote this book requires its characters to be "types," the characters were hardly "typecast": Rather, she gives us some interesting heroes, sadistic villains, a ravishing heroine and some tragic heroes that make this novel as palatable a read for those (such as I) who enjoy convincing characterization as much as fast-paced plotting ("Double Crossing" has both).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Interplanetary Funksmanship on June 14, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"Man's Humanity to Man": It's a line from this riveting Cold War-era novel from Erika Holzer. That line sums up the book's theme, during its climatic chapters. As for the plot, I won't give too much away, save that it's intricately plotted suspense that culminates in a daring escape at the Berlin Wall.

I first read "Double Crossing" in 1984, shortly after it was published, and while stationed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, as an Army private, just turned 19. Coming back to reading it (doing the math, I'm now 42 -- more than two lifetimes of a nineteen year old) I was prepared to find it "dated," because the Berlin Wall fell just five years later, in 1989. At the time of my first reading, I was reading a lot of Robert Ludlum and Ken Follett spy novels, and remembered regarding this book as belonging in the same company.

Yet, upon re-reading, "Double Crossing" was even better this time because it wasn't dated at all, it just aged nicely. Reading a book at 42 is worlds away from reading it at 19, and what struck me this go around was that Holzer took a family saga and wrapped it inside a political spy thriller. At 19, I read it for its plot, but this time I got wrapped up in the personal lives of its characters. Although the particular genre in which Holzer wrote this book requires its characters to be "types," the characters were hardly "typecast": Rather, she gives us some interesting heroes, sadistic villains, a ravishing heroine and some tragic heroes that make this novel as palatable a read for those (such as I) who enjoy convincing characterization as much as fast-paced plotting ("Double Crossing" has both).
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By warrenm on June 5, 2002
Format: Hardcover
In the end, a good novel is about people and Ms. Holzer does a wonderful job in "Double Crossing," making us care about those who live in slavery and will do anything to find freedom. This is an uplifting, powerful novel by someone who obviously knows the territory. i recommend it highly.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Interplanetary Funksmanship on June 14, 2007
Format: Hardcover
"Man's Humanity to Man": It's a line from this riveting Cold War-era novel from Erika Holzer. That line sums up the book's theme, during its climatic chapters. As for the plot, I won't give too much away, save that it's intricately plotted suspense that culminates in a daring escape at the Berlin Wall.

I first read "Double Crossing" in 1984, shortly after it was published, and while stationed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, as an Army private, just turned 19. Coming back to reading it (doing the math, I'm now 42 -- more than two lifetimes of a nineteen year old) I was prepared to find it "dated," because the Berlin Wall fell just five years later, in 1989. At the time of my first reading, I was reading a lot of Robert Ludlum and Ken Follett spy novels, and remembered regarding this book as belonging in the same company.

Yet, upon re-reading, "Double Crossing" was even better this time because it wasn't dated at all, it just aged nicely. Reading a book at 42 is worlds away from reading it at 19, and what struck me this go around was that Holzer took a family saga and wrapped it inside a political spy thriller. At 19, I read it for its plot, but this time I got wrapped up in the personal lives of its characters. Although the particular genre in which Holzer wrote this book requires its characters to be "types," the characters were hardly "typecast": Rather, she gives us some interesting heroes, sadistic villains, a ravishing heroine and some tragic heroes that make this novel as palatable a read for those (such as I) who enjoy convincing characterization as much as fast-paced plotting ("Double Crossing" has both).
Read more ›
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