Double Double: A Dual Memoir of Alcoholism and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $25.00
  • Save: $5.83 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 15 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Double Double: A Dual Mem... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Nearly brand new book that shows only slight signs of wear. Selection as wide as the Mississippi.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Double Double: A Dual Memoir of Alcoholism Hardcover – June 4, 2013


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$19.17
$2.64 $0.01

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Check out The Amazon Book Review, our editors' fresh new blog featuring interviews with authors, book reviews, quirky essays on book trends, and regular columns by our editors. Explore now
$19.17 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 15 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Double Double: A Dual Memoir of Alcoholism + Vertigo 42: A Richard Jury Mystery
Price for both: $38.03

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Fans of best-selling mystery writer Martha Grimes might be shocked to learn that she was a habitual and self-destructive alcoholic for almost 30 years, before seeking help in 1990. Her son, Ken, was also a drinker, beginning at the age of 13 and continuing for more than a decade, until (also in 1990) he, too, began pulling himself out of his addiction. This collaborative memoir, written in mostly alternating chapters, recounts their lives before, during, and after their addictions. Although they are telling very similar stories, there are many differences in the way the authors see their former selves; even their approaches to healing were different (Martha entered a rehab clinic, while Ken did a 12-step program). But one similarity permeates the book: these are two strong, self-aware people who fell into their addictions by accident and were unaware of their growing reliance on alcohol until it was nearly too late to stop, and then each of them found the strength to reverse the pattern. This deserves shelf space alongside other literary alcoholism memoirs including Pete Hamill’s A Drinking Life (1994) and Augusten Burroughs’ Dry (2003). --David Pitt

Review

Double Double could have been titled Double-Barreled—it hits like a .12 gauge sawed-off at close range. The brutal illumination of a dual descent into alcoholism is also a penetrating insight: the lives of a mother and son run parallel, becoming intertwined only when each found their own, very separate, way out. This is no ‘self-help’ book—it packs the narrative force of a Martha Grimes novel . . . and perfectly illustrates how the finest fiction is created only when its foundational basis is truth.” (Andrew Vachss, New York Times bestselling author of That’s How I Roll and Blackjack)
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Lyme Disease
Check out the newest book by Scott Simon. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner (June 4, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1476724083
  • ISBN-13: 978-1476724089
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #661,496 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Martha Grimes is the bestselling author of twenty-one Richard Jury novels, as well as the novels Dakota and Foul Matter, among others. Her previous two Jury books, The Old Wine Shades and Dust, both appeared on the New York Times bestseller list.

Customer Reviews

The writing is frank, witty, and engaging.
Amelia Gremelspacher
There was no need for Martha to hide her drinking from Ken because it really did not seem to be all that unusual to either of them.
Sam Sattler
A good book for anyone in recovery or that has a family member or friend dealing with addiction.
shirley lebato

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Bookreporter on June 10, 2013
Format: Hardcover
"How much effort would you want to expend on solving a problem that you're told in the end cannot be solved?" This is the dilemma of alcoholism: it is an obstacle that is always in the path. Author Martha Grimes and her son, Ken, have teamed up to provide their sometimes shared, sometimes divergent views on what it means to be an alcoholic. Both are looking backward at the issue, as they are now sober.

In an account in which they trade off chapters in some cases and engage in dialogue in others, the two embarrass themselves and each other: Ken reminding his mother that he first learned how to bartend as a kid at her cocktail parties, and Martha confessing that she never realized, or chose to ignore, the warning signs that her child was becoming an addict. Between the two, there are all the common stories: the lost memories, the lost years, the lies to others and oneself about why one keeps on drinking. Why would one not? Isn't the point of life to be happy and avoid pain? And doesn't booze help you do that?

Martha writes honestly, "Am I glad I stopped? Yes. I only wish the rewards were more obvious." Yes, she still wants to drink, but she won't, because quitting was "a miracle." Ken attributes his success at getting sober to "conscious contact with a power greater than myself." He can tell you how many days and hours he's been sober; for Martha, the attempts were more blurred and she isn't interested in keeping count. But they agree on one very important principle: the only way to deal with alcoholism is to stop drinking. Though she has intellectual quibbles with the 12-step approach, Martha acknowledges that it works because its basis is quitting. Psychotherapy, which she also tried, may tacitly allow people to think they are okay even if they still get drunk sometimes.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Sam Sattler on July 29, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Having one alcoholic in the family is bad enough, but it seldom stops there. Sadly enough, alcoholism is a never-ending problem for many families, one that can devastate them for generations. In Double Double: A Dual Memoir of Alcoholism, popular mystery writer Martha Grimes and her son Ken very frankly share their own struggles to get, and remain, sober.

The pair, in alternate chapters and several "conversations," look both backward and forward in their lives, revisiting the times and events during which they became addicts, their struggles to survive their addictions, the manner in which they finally got themselves sober, what their lives are like today, and what their hopes are for the future. Despite living in the same house during the worst of all of this, Martha and Ken managed to hide their problems from each other, or were so caught up in their individual struggles with addiction, that neither was much aware of what the other was experiencing.

Ken, in particular, appears to have been a master of deception, the rather typical teenager who easily managed to hide his real life from his mother. Martha, on the other hand, made alcohol such a constant part of her everyday life that the lifestyle seemed perfectly normal to her and her son. There was no need for Martha to hide her drinking from Ken because it really did not seem to be all that unusual to either of them.

Despite the similarities in their stories, what are likely to intrigue readers most are the pair's different approaches to attaining and maintaining sobriety. Ken is a true believer in AA's Twelve-Step approach, while Martha seems to have been so put off by the program's more overtly religious aspects that she could not tolerate the meetings.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Amelia Gremelspacher TOP 500 REVIEWER on July 15, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Writing a memoir on addiction is a dicey proposition. The rooms (AA meetings) are full of worse stories on the consequences that alcohol exacts. Memoirs are ripe fruit on the ground. Celebrity is represented to the highest A list. This book is still special. Martha does not work AA and her son Ken does. They are both sober from alcohol for years. In an even more difficult task, they have written a book that is balanced and engaging. They are able to address the denial that each of them had towards the use of the other person without anger, but also without blurring the pain of their relationship. The writing is frank, witty, and engaging. Their stories are head on without pathos or self justification. This is really a lovely book about addiction and recovery. I never thought I would use the words addiction and lovely in the same sentence.

They have their differences. Martha believes an alcoholic is made, not born. She believes that she taught herself the ease and normality of drinking as the years went by. Ken believes alcoholics are born, although he also explores the history that greased his fall into addiction. But both agree that they came to feel normal only with alcohol, and that eventually this normalcy just wasn't good enough. The title of the book comes from Macbeth: "Double double toil and trouble, Fire burn and cauldron bubble." The story follows this line of misfortune muliplying through the years of use. Another line is from "Double Indemnity", "Right down the line." The paths of their addictions were going straight to the place of all addictions, down. Given their respective recognitions of their roads, this story is also one of gaining sobriety, and keeping it.

Addicts are not the exceptions to the human race.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Double Double: A Dual Memoir of Alcoholism
This item: Double Double: A Dual Memoir of Alcoholism
Price: $25.00 $19.17
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?