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Double & Triple Concertos Import


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Audio CD, Import, January 1, 2002
$28.87
$16.99 $1.49


Product Details

  • Orchestra: The Academy of Ancient Music
  • Conductor: Christopher Hogwood
  • Composer: Georg Philipp Telemann
  • Audio CD (January 1, 2002)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Polygram Classics
  • ASIN: B000004CXA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #30,403 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. I. Largo
2. II. Allegro
3. III. Adagio
4. IV. Presto
5. I. Spiritoso
6. II. Grave
7. III. Allegro
8. I. Largo
9. II. Allegro
10. III. Largo
11. IV. Presto
12. I. Dolce-Allegro
13. II. Largo
14. III. Allegro
15. I. Andante
16. II. Allegro
17. III. Siciliano
18. IV. Vivace

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

In addition to volumes and volumes of church and chamber music, the astonishingly prolific Georg Philipp Telemann wrote a great many concertos--the most engaging of which are those for two or more solo instruments, often in interesting combinations. It must be said that many of these concertos are a bit lightweight, but they are lively and diverting--and Christopher Hogwood and the baroque-instrument specialists of the Academy of Ancient Music give them accomplished, persuasive performances. Among the tasty confections here are a vigorous concerto for three trumpets; a double concerto for recorder and transverse flute--in the 18th-century context, the old-fashioned and the newfangled side by side; and the "Concerto polonois" for string orchestra without soloists, based on rustic dance music Telemann heard in Poland as a young man. Then there's the gorgeous concerto for flute, oboe d'amore, and viola d'amore (the last two being lower-pitched versions of the oboe and viola): in the hands of Stephen Preston, Clare Shanks, and Monica Huggett, respectively, Telemann's music for these aptly named instruments brings to mind waking up on a bright sunny morning with your true love in your arms. --Matthew Westphal

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Johnny Prada on July 11, 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is one of the best recodings ever with this duo: AAM & Sir Christopher Hogwood. The sound quality of this recording is superb.
It was my first Telemann (then, on LP) and gave me an overwhealming first impression about the German composer. The repertoire is magnificently selected for this group of concertos, including some less usual ones, as the Concerto Polonois.
Hogwood and AAM exhibit a very precise and most melodic reading, with perfect tempi, according to the main features of the orchestra, besides the use of epoch instruments. The selection is so good that it's hard to choose a preferred or a major piece.
Known as a tremendously prolific composer, Georg Phillip Telemann paid the price for putting J. S. Bach on lower platforms at their times: after his death, Telemann became regarded as a "minor composer". But nothing as giving time time. Here, we can hear some of the best Telemann in a very common baroque form: the double concerto.
Strongly recommended.
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By Lee on May 31, 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Really liked this recording of Telemann by Hogwood and the Academy of Ancient Music, glad I bought it. Usually I find the Academy of Ancient Music's recordings my favorite, but I gave this one 4 rather than 5 stars because if I had to choose my favorite Telemann CD it would be the Musica Antiqua Koln - Reinhard Goebel CD, "Telemann: String Concertos". The Concerto Polonois on this second disc is in every way superior to the Immer version reviewed here.
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Format: Audio CD
This disc, originally issued in 1983, contains a reasonable cross section of Telemann's concerto output. The recording is clear and well balanced and the playing is good without some of the extra 'flair' that some modern performers from Italy and Germany especially bring to the music making. However, it is arguable that some of this 'flair' may be more than Telemann might have expected and this we may never find out. In the meantime, on its own terms, this disc is very satisfying.

The opening concerto for 3 trumpets and strings is a striking piece and shows Telemann's ear for mixing different timbres of instruments. His ear for combinations of instruments is also illustrated in the final concerto on the disc for flute, oboe d'amore, and viola d'amore plus strings. The central concerto featuring recorder and flute equally explores tonal characteristics and differences. These three concertos also illustrate Telemann's method of following the Italian 'sonata da chiesa' form of writing concertos in four movements, slow-fast-slow-fast.

The disc also illustrates Telemann following the Venetian concerto model of three movements, fast-slow-fast, and that is to be found in the Concerto Polonois. This piece is also a clear reference to Polish music and that influence permeates a great deal of Telemann's work where he made use of his own Polish experiences as Kapellmeister to the household of Count Erdmann II of Promnitz. On this disc there are examples of polonaise, and mazurka idioms as well as other Polish dance forms embedded into the musical constructions.

This is an interesting, informative and satisfying introduction to Telemann's concerto writing. Although it could be thought of as a slightly sober approach by some modern standards it nevertheless remains valid on its own terms. As such it is well worth considering as a purchase.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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Format: Audio CD
This disc, originally issued in 1983, contains a reasonable cross section of Telemann's concerto output. The recording is clear and well balanced and the playing is good without some of the extra 'flair' that some modern performers from Italy and Germany especially bring to the music making. However, it is arguable that some of this 'flair' may be more than Telemann might have expected and this we may never find out. In the meantime, on its own terms, this disc is very satisfying.

The opening concerto for 3 trumpets and strings is a striking piece and shows Telemann's ear for mixing different timbres of instruments. His ear for combinations of instruments is also illustrated in the final concerto on the disc for flute, oboe d'amore, and viola d'amore plus strings. The central concerto featuring recorder and flute equally explores tonal characteristics and differences. These three concertos also illustrate Telemann's method of following the Italian 'sonata da chiesa' form of writing concertos in four movements, slow-fast-slow-fast.

The disc also illustrates Telemann following the Venetian concerto model of three movements, fast-slow-fast, and that is to be found in the Concerto Polonois. This piece is also a clear reference to Polish music and that influence permeates a great deal of Telemann's work where he made use of his own Polish experiences as Kapellmeister to the household of Count Erdmann II of Promnitz. On this disc there are examples of polonaise, and mazurka idioms as well as other Polish dance forms embedded into the musical constructions.

This is an interesting, informative and satisfying introduction to Telemann's concerto writing. Although it could be thought of as a slightly sober approach by some modern standards it nevertheless remains valid on its own terms. As such it is well worth considering as a purchase.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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