Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.95
  • Save: $1.99 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Downhill Slide: Why the C... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: This book has already been well loved by someone else and that love shows. It MIGHT have highlighting, underlining, be missing a dust jacket, or SLIGHT water damage, but over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Downhill Slide: Why the Corporate Ski Industry is Bad for Skiing, Ski Towns, and the Environment Paperback – October 1, 2003


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.96
$3.91 $0.02
$13.96 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Downhill Slide: Why the Corporate Ski Industry is Bad for Skiing, Ski Towns, and the Environment + DEEP The Story of Skiing and The Future of Snow
Price for both: $23.86

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Sierra Club Books; 1 edition (October 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1578051029
  • ISBN-13: 978-1578051021
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #507,661 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"[This] book should be mandatory reading."--Los Angeles Times -- Review

About the Author

Hal Clifford is the author of The Falling Season: Inside the Life and Death Drama of Aspen's Mountain Rescue Team, winner of the Colorado Council for the Arts Prize for Best Non-Fiction, and Highroad Guide to the Colorado Mountains. His work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Business Week, National Geographic Adventure, Outside, and Orion. A former editor of the Aspen Daily News and Ski Magazine, Clifford currently serves as Executive Director of Mountainfilm in Telluride, Colorado.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

This simply isn't the case.
the_global_village_idiot
I found it to be well researched, well edited, and yes, opinionated.
ipski
This is no question, one of the best books I have ever read.
Paula F. Berg

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Timothy Ritter on January 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is the kind of book there should have been more of forty years ago; then we might not be in this fix.
Clifford sketches the transformation of the ski industry from a quaint and healthy alternative to gambling and drinking in the 19th and early 20th centuries, to a monster industry in the 21st, still healthy but not so quaint, that gives drinking and gambling fierce competition for discretionary dollars in our nation's mountain towns.
As mining and logging was gradually phased out, the focus shifted to recreation, changing charming towns into mere appendages of mega-resorts whose reason for being is the hawking of overpriced real estate, overpriced equipment, overpriced food, overpriced lift tickets-- and in the summer overpriced greens fees and tickets to film and music festivals. In most cases the resorts' gouging rest upon a firm foundation of reasonably priced public land leases, usually involving the US Forest Service, an agency of the Dept of Agriculture.
This last detail presents a problem for Clifford and his publisher, Sierra Club Books, For as logging and mining revenues to the USDA decline, it is hesitant to raise too sharply the rents or regulations on its new, relatively clean tenants, the resort operators. When Clifford makes the case for saving elk or lynx habitat the Forest Service is no doubt sympathetic, but probably a lot more interested in saving its own budget, and all the jobs that it supports. And a ski run, while not ideal, is a much better place for wildlife to thrive than what's left after a mining company extracts ore.
In Colorado there is a pair of sites, both mentioned in DOWNHILL SLIDE: Copper Mtn. Ski Area, and just 5 miles up the road, the mothballed Climax Molybdenum Mine.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 16, 2002
Format: Hardcover
As a life-long Vailite, and an active board member of Colorado Wild and the Ski Area Citizens' Coalition,
I have found Mr. Clifford's book invaluable. We have known for quite some time that the sport of skiing
is in trouble and that the recent corporatization of skiing and associated development is causing enormous
stress on ski towns and the environment. Clifford has concisely and coherently expressed the problems, chosen
superb and telling examples and given citizens of ski towns throughout the country a lot to think about.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 18, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book reminded me of Eric Schlosser's "Fast Food Nation" (thorough, probing, disturbing & readable). "Downhill Slide" takes a look at the dangerous reach (Disneyfication) of Corporate America. This book is a must read for skiers (avid and former), the ski industry (listen up!), environmentalists and those who care about those "last best places."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By charles falk VINE VOICE on May 6, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book should be required reading for people, skiers and non-skiers alike, who patronize ski resorts. DOWNHILL SLIDE exposes what really drives the continuing expansion of ski resorts -- and it isn't skiing. Clifford focuses on the "Big Three", the publically-traded corporations that control a large chunk of all the resorts in North America.
Although actual ski-run usage (including ski boarders) has been flat for a decade, resorts continue to bombard the US Forest Service with requests for more public land to build ski runs on. Why would they need more runs if the number of skiers is static? To build more condos and "ski villages" around. Clifford says that these companies are theme park/real estate developers masquerading as sports facilities.
The resorts are marketed as year-round recreation sites in order to keep the condos full of consumers for the retail establishments in the artifical "villages". The chapter entitled "Potemkin Villages and Emerald Cities" ought to bring a blush to the faces of those who sneer at Disneyland, but gush over the quaint shops and interesting restaurants at places like Breckenridge, Copper Mountain, or Whistler.
Why should we care that big corporations are peddling phoney "life experiences" in the heart of our public lands? Because Clifford says these bogus communities that are springing up in the most scenic parts of our national forests are environmental disaster sites. The thin mountain air is ill-equipped to cope with large new sources of pollution. Access roads and boundary fences interfere with wildlife. Clifford describes starving elk herds kept from their grazing areas by the fences around ranchettes put up by clebrities attracted to the Aspen lifestyle. Snowmaking equipment gobbles up enourmous quantities of energy and water.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 15, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book is much more accurate and readable than other recent ski industry tell-alls such as Powder Burn. The strength of the book lies in its central argument that the huge capital infusions into ski areas by big corporations (what he calls the resort "arms race") have done nothing to increase overall skier visits or investor share prices, while at the same time driving out those small areas unable to match these tactics. This short term thinking leads to a homogenization of the skiing experience. As a lifelong skier who grew up on a small hill and who now lives in one of the towns detailed by this book, I would say that Mr. Clifford's perception of this unfortunate trend is spot on. He also accurately recounts how the ski industry and the USFS categorically deny that ski area development has much greater off-site impacts than they would have the public believe. Finally he does an excellent job describing the political power of a big-time ski company in a small town. Based on personal experience, I would argue that he actually underestimates the reach of industry influence in state and local politics.
However, I would partially agree with some of the other writers who panned this book. Are we skiers really such dupes that we go to a resort and can't seem to keep our wallet in our pocket? To lay the blame for poor spending habits at the feet of the ski industry is a stretch.
Additionally, in specific instances (particularly surrounding the Vail Category III expansion and land trades in Eagle County, with which I am very familiar), Mr. Clifford omitted or failed to emphasize factual information that would have made his argument less cut-and-dried. To be fair, his assessment is generally correct, but in simplifying very complex issues he loses some critical points.
If you enjoy mountain sports, this book is well worth your time. Just keep in mind that it's not a scientific study.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?