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Dr. Bloodmoney Paperback – May 14, 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (May 14, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375719296
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375719295
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 4.9 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,253,184 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Written in the late 1950s and early 1960s, these titles follow Dick's familiar theme that things and people are not quite what and who they seem, basically challenging reality. Though dead for 20 years now, Dick still is hugely popular among sf readers and Blade Runner nuts, so pop for these.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

“[A] brilliant, idiosyncratic, formidably intelligent writer. . . . Dick illuminates. He casts light. He gives off a radiance.” --The Washington Post

“Philip K. Dick’s best books always describe a future that is both entirely recognizable and utterly unimaginable.” --The New York Times Book Review

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Customer Reviews

By the end of the book things have gotten stranger than you're likely to expect, which is part of what I love about this book.
Edward E. Rom
Some of his most interesting characters and concepts found in later books evolved from this one, his most intelligent post-bomb novel.
thetwonky
Dr. Bloodmoney very quietly, without the reader realizing it, becomes a very strong character study with one of PKD's largest casts.
Eric San Juan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Edward E. Rom on November 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
I have been aware of the work of Philip K. Dick for a very long time; I can recall seeing the Ace Double with _Dr. Futurity_ on one side on the racks when it was new. The same is true with _Dr. Bloodmoney_. I think I made my first attempt at reading a Dick novel when I was in junior high school, and over the ensuing 40 years or so have periodically made more attempts at enjoying the work of Dick, with infrequent success.

Now it is as though I have discovered a new writer, and in some ways it's like being in elementary school and discovering Heinlein, van Vogt, Poul Anderson etc. again. In the case of this particular book, it is indeed new to me, as I never tried _Dr. Bloodmoney_ before.

This book starts out just like a mainstream novel, and slips into the stfnal mode gradually, by stages. At the beginning, it's just a normal day at a TV store in Berkeley, CA. But after a bit, things start to get a little strange, when it is revealed that the phocomelus is not only telekinetic, but also can see the future, if he drinks a bottle of beer. By the end of the book things have gotten stranger than you're likely to expect, which is part of what I love about this book. Another part is that the characters are still very believable, even when they are doing convincing telepathic impersonations of the dead, or the like.

Dick's strengths are not the strengths of most science fiction writers. His science tends to be weak, while he excels in plotting and characterization. His strongest point is his ability to juxtapose extremely weird ideas with convincing characters and plotlines. It all actually makes sense, at least if the reader has mental flexibility.

If you're a fan of Dick, I think you would like this book very much.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Eric San Juan VINE VOICE on September 3, 2008
Format: Paperback
Saying a Philip K. Dick book is weird is like saying the sun will come up in the morning. But this book was weird. And great. But also weird.

A post-apocalypse story featuring telekenetic, armless, legless freaks, a man who can (or thinks he can, or can, or thinks he can) bring about nuclear war through sheer force of will, and a huge cast of characters trying to go on with their lives after nuclear war -- that's Dr. Bloodmoney. At times it feels rather plotless and aimless, full of ideas with no clear purpose, yet it somehow manages to rise above its haphazard nature and become an excellent book thanks to the richness of the cast and the interesting setting.

While there is a lot of grappling with who and what people really are, the prevailing theme here is one of prejudice, something slightly different (but not entirely alien) from Dick's usual fare. He handles the subject matter well. Lots of strange characters, unusual events, and all the stuff you expect from PKD. Dr. Bloodmoney very quietly, without the reader realizing it, becomes a very strong character study with one of PKD's largest casts.

This one is very good, only a small step away from his best work.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Schtinky VINE VOICE on September 15, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Even though Philip Dick wrote his SciFi in the 50's and 60's, his style, prose, and vision remain timeless. His ability to nail the human character transcends the time frame of his works.

In 1972, an "accident" occurred, due to a mistake by scientist Dr. Bruno Bluthgeld. Bruno, aka "Mr. Tree", hasn't been able to live with himself since the accident, and seeks the help of psychiatrist Dr. Stockstill during the year 1981. As he steps out from Stockstill's offices, the bombs begin to fall.

Surviving the bombs are also Hoppy Harrington, an armless and legless thalidomide victim with telekinetic powers, Walter Dangerfield, who was sent up in a ship with his wife to travel to Mars but wound out eternally orbiting the earth instead, Stuart McConchie, a TV repairman, and Bonnie Keller, an unhappy housewife and former associate of Dr. Bluthgeld.

They all find themselves in the same West Marin community, living an urban life with no electricity and traveling by wood-burning vehicles or horse. Bonny has a child now, a strange girl with a twin brother inside of her. Bluthgeld becomes more deranged, Walt becomes sick, Hoppy becomes a megalomaniac, and Bonnie's twin Bill awakens.

Things get stranger and stranger in West Marin as the survivors struggle to stay alive, not only in the blighted world, but inside their newly emerged social structures.

'Dr. Bloodmoney' is not the best of Philip Dick's works, but is a memorable tale to add to your collection. Strangely compelling with odd, unpredictable characters, this book makes a very nice beach or vacation read. Enjoy!
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17 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 17, 2002
Format: Paperback
The first image in this novel is that of a black man named Stuart McConchie sweeping the sidewalk in front of a Berkeley TV shop, eyeing the pretty girls on their way to work and indulging in some contempt for the approaching patients of the psychiatrist across the street. In any ordinary novel, that image would tell you that the book is going to be about that black man and those patients. In PKD, the image tells you that the book will be about prejudice.
The average author, to tackle that theme, would provide us with a group of unprejudiced characters battling a group of prejudiced ones and make it very clear which are the good guys and which the bad guys. PKD was always a little too smart for that. Just about every character in "Dr. Bloodmoney" is suspicious of pretty nearly every other character he or she meets at one time or another. That includes several characters who have good reason to be suspicious - Bruno Bluthgeld, for instance, the Dr. Bloodmoney of the title, who believes himself personally responsible for the nuclear exchange that brings the world to its knees. Hoppy Harrington, too, has good reason for his suspicions - he's a telekinetic biological sport with no arms or legs at a time when atomic radiation has produced talking dogs and musical rats, so everyone's been looking at him funny his whole life; he's not just imagining things.
However, the culture of suspicion even affects little Edie Keller and the undeveloped but quite powerful twin brother in her body. The culture of suspicion gets to Edie's father, George, who thinks his wife is cheating on him (he's right). It affects everyone, even the best of men and women. About the only character with no prejudice to speak of in "Dr.
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