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Dracula Kindle Edition

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Length: 408 pages Word Wise: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Those who cannot find their own reflection in Bram Stoker's still-living creation are surely the undead ."
— New York Times Review of Books

"An exercise in masculine anxiety and nationalist paranoia, Stoker's novel is filled with scenes that are staggeringly lurid and perverse.... The one in Highgate cemetery, where Arthur and Van Helsing drive a stake through the writhing body of the vampirised Lucy Westenra, is my favourite."
Sarah Waters, author of The Little Stranger

"It is splendid. No book since Mrs. Shelley's Frankenstein or indeed any other at all has come near yours in originality, or terror."
Bram Stoker's Mother --Bram Stoker's Mother

About the Author

Abraham "Bram" Stoker (8 November 1847 – 20 April 1912) was an Irish novelist and short story writer, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned.

Product Details

  • File Size: 618 KB
  • Print Length: 408 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1450594875
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publication Date: May 17, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0084B5TK8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #825 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Paula Fontes on December 5, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
One of my all-time favorite books. There are scenes in this book that send chills up my spine. Unlike the new "vampire" books/movies, you won't find multiple pages devoted to the color & gleam of the Counts' eyes. There is no teenage angst in one single paragraph! It's the original AND it's perfect for the grown-up, grown-past the bubblegum.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By ScrawnyPunk on December 28, 2010
Format: Paperback
Dracula is the story everyone knows, but few have read. If you have seen any of its film adaptations or imitators, you should read this short novel to re-set your expectations. The depths of psychological exploration into the Count's motives, history, methods, and tradition are unmatched elsewhere. This is a rare example of a writer creating a dark fantasy which sets the metaphysical rules for an entire literary universe. [If you love a short review, stop here - the remaining commentary is extraneous to your purpose.]

The plot is well-known and does not bear repeating here. However, it is worth mentioning liberties taken by various adaptations not included in the book. Mina Harker is never likened to the Count's deceased love; sunlight does not kill him; Renfield is not his servant; and no one ever says "I vant to suck your blood." The absence of these tropes forces the novel into subtle territory regarding motives and action, ultimately yielding a richer story than I initially expected.
Two major shifts in the narrative are instrumental in raising the novel above predecessors such as "The Vampyre," "Carmilla," and "Varney the Vampire." The first is the change in protagonist from Dracula to van Helsing, a shift which creates a mechanism to propel the narrative from start to finish. Whereas the Count's early scenes set the story in motion, it is the professor's later involvement and analysis which govern the other characters' actions and propel the remainder of the story. The second major shift is the change in victim from Lucy to Mina, which provides a psychological underpinning to the novel and raises it above genre fiction.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Midnyte Reader on February 23, 2011
Format: Paperback
I did it! Finally! After all these years, I read Dracula! It took me a long time for several reasons. First of all, the font is small in the book I own, which made it difficult to read. Then I downloaded it on my Kindle and that was better, but I was also reading other books at the same time. Another reason why it may have taken me so long is the way it is written. In today's world, we are used to fast paced novels while Dracula is detailed, the writing old fashioned and the dialogue long. The different style, the sometimes plodding pace, the archaic words such as "bestrewed" and "perforce" forced me to slow down, but it also helped me immerse myself in the story.

Stoker never visited Eastern Europe, but within the first few pages it is clear he did his research. The food, the garb and the landscape of Romania are so detailed, that although it is a bit tedious to get through, I really got a feel for the country. I visualized the imposing mountains and their dark shadows. As I read about Jonathan Harker's journey to the castle, I heard foreboding music accompanied by howling in my head. I don't know if seeing so many movies let me imagine the story better, but it was very vivid in my mind. There is a sense of wonder when you travel to a place where you don't know the language, but also one of unease. The fact that Harker is a foreigner gave him more distance from his surroundings and made him more vulnerable.

After getting through the first few pages of exposition and Jonathan's journey to the castle, it got juicy. The novel Dracula is much more messed up and scary than any movie version I've seen. I had a preconceived notion because of film and television, but the book is different and I feel like I discovered a new story, or rather learned the true story.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Casey Johnson on December 24, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very suspenseful and hard to put down at points. Ending dragged on a bit and there were some parts I don't feel were explained enough (such as how Jonathan Harker escapes Castle Dracula at the beginning.) But over all, very good and I can see why it's considered a classic!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Scorpio on November 21, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Having set upon myself the task of reading or rereading a classic piece of literature in between each new release I have once again discovered the masterpiece that is Dracula. Although it has been 30 years since I first read it, it still had me captivated the whole journey through.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Stuart Ayris on August 8, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Bram Stoker wrote Dracula in 1897. It was the year that marked Queen Victoria's 60th year on the throne, the birth of Frank Capra (Director of It's A Wonderful Life), the death of the German composer Johannes Brahms and the foundation of Italian football giants Juventus. 1897 also saw the Australian cricket team defeat England 4-1 in the Ashes. An interesting year then, but not the most interesting. I feel the same could be said for Bram Stoker's Dracula.

The first section of the book where Jonathan Harker goes to Transylvania to assist Count Dracula in making preparations to buy a property in England is atmospheric, creepy and somewhat disturbing. Unfortunately, this only comprises less than a quarter of the book. The rest of it is a combination of diary entries and notes from the various other characters in the novel (including Harker but not including Count Dracula) and as such is reminiscent of other Victorian novels such as The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins.

Unlike The Moonstone, I found the characters in Dracula to be largely insipid and one dimensional. There is the gung-ho American, the stiff-upper lip Englishman, the love-lorn Doctor, the courageous Lord and women who do nothing but adore these men in a thoroughly pathetic fashion. And then there is Van Helsing - a 72 year old Dutchman who is a self-proclaimed expert in Vampires and a sort of supernatural Sherlock Holmes. I have to say that I found the passages from Van Helsing to be at times unreadable with the author obviously attempting to proclaim Van Helsing's foreign roots by having him write his entries with constant errors in grammar. For a world-renowned Professor I would have thought he would have been a better linguist to be honest.
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