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54 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HONESTY CAN BE AN UNPLEASANT WAY OF LEARNING THE TRUTH
In an age of drones, spy satellites, internet espionage, GPS and cell phone tapping conducted by most of the worlds leading nations (and also many international criminal organizations) ... how can we decent individuals protect our privacy? You may be shocked at how little is actually left available to us as a result of this book's well-researched and outstandingly...
Published 12 months ago by Robert Steven Thomas

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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not a how-to book
If you're looking for a simple list of suggestions on how to protect your privacy, you won't find it here. The book recounts the author's attempts to limit dissemination of her personal information, but without offering any succinct evaluation of what was "good, better or best." Instead, she tries various solutions and reports the results leaving it to the...
Published 10 months ago by Pike Creek


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54 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HONESTY CAN BE AN UNPLEASANT WAY OF LEARNING THE TRUTH, February 25, 2014
By 
Robert Steven Thomas (author, researcher, retired executive) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance (Hardcover)
In an age of drones, spy satellites, internet espionage, GPS and cell phone tapping conducted by most of the worlds leading nations (and also many international criminal organizations) ... how can we decent individuals protect our privacy? You may be shocked at how little is actually left available to us as a result of this book's well-researched and outstandingly informative presentation. On one side there is a legitimate need for our governments to protect us from terrorism, identity-theft and international scamming. At the other end is the reasonable desire for most individuals to demand a right to privacy and individual freedoms. At what point, exactly, should collective societal safety trump individual rights? As you will discover in this excellent book, there is a very fine line of difference that separates the two. So how do we protect ourselves? The author has provided a thoughtful and potentially well-constructed answer to this difficult challenge. It is one that can work and involves participation from us all. The more people who are aware of this strategy - the better we will all sleep at night.
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65 of 71 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting read with good tips for protecting your privacy., February 25, 2014
This review is from: Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance (Hardcover)
This is an important book and I'm glad I had the opportunity to read it. For those of concerned about privacy, it's a useful read.
The book is structured like a memoir. The author was a reporter for the Wall Street Journal. Refreshingly, she's a married mom with two kids. I say this because, normally the people writing about government surveillance and privacy issues are single, white men. She begins the book with a brief review of privacy and government violation of it from the beginning of the republic to now. The rest of the book is taken up with her mission to retake as much of her privacy as possible and leave the smallest possible digital footprint.
She finds that it is no easy task retaking your personal information from the data brokers. We are constantly tracked while online. "Anonymous" profiles of people are assembled by these data brokers based on what websites people visit. Based on the information they collect, they'll present you with ads based on your presumed interests. More detailed profiles of people are assembled and used to determine what prices you see for say insurance or plane tickets.
This book was a real eye-opener for me. I took for granted that my moves online were tracked, but I had no idea to the degree which it is done. Most troubling is this data industry is completely unregulated. Once they have your data, you cannot compel them to reveal what they know or to delete their data on you. The only exception to this is your credit score.
I dog-eared and underlined quite a few sections in this book because she has practical tips for minimizing your exposure. I hope that if this book goes to a paperback edition, she'll assemble some of the more useful tips into a single section at the end of the book.
I think the author's conclusion to her book is a bit Pollyannaish. She argues that pollution used to be much worse in the US (an example she sites are rivers bursting into flames, and that for the most part rivers are much cleaner). Pollution is a non-specific problem like the privacy problem, but people got together and encouraged Congress to pass laws that prevent the dumping of chemicals in our rivers. I disagree. I think people have gotten too inured to having little privacy. I see things getting much worse and staying that way. People voluntarily join facebook and are happy to share nearly everything about their lives (I'm looking at you people that post pictures of your food).
My one complaint about this book is her brief reference to bookstores. "Similarly, I used to go to my local bookstore and buy books in cash. Now, all the bookstores are dying, and Amazon is my local bookstore." If you order on Amazon because of the convenience or the prices, fine, it's understandable. But don't pretend like you would still go to your local bookstore if it hadn't closed. You stopped going because of the uber convenience of Amazon. Furthermore, this author lives in New York City, and there are no independent bookstores left in New York City, really?
But aside from my tirade on this minor thing, the book is excellent and I would recommend it to those concerned about their privacy.
I received an advanced reader's copy of this book from the publisher. So take that for what you will.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be required reading for all Americans, March 2, 2014
By 
Bill Blankenship (Sioux City, IA USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance (Hardcover)
Privacy is a hot topic in the news of late. This book goes right to the heart of this issue. The writing is excellent. Julia Angwin speaks from and describes her own experiences with all aspects of the subject. She places her story in the context of her life and her own family. I appreciate this personal touch and the relationship to real life. Too often non-fiction books of this sort present a logical and scholarly analysis of the problem that is difficult to relate to one's own life. This book does not do that; it is relevant.

I am a technically savvy person only to an average degree. But I could tell from her discussion that the author is not seriously techie about any of the subjects she discussed. Advanced dissertations on the topics in the book was not what I was looking for when I bought the book, and if that is what you want, this is not the book for you. However, if you want to understand how privacy in your life has been impacted by government and industry, then this book is a must read.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Somewhat frightening story about the lack of privacy, February 27, 2014
This review is from: Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance (Hardcover)
`Dragnet Nation' written by awarded journalist Julia Angwin is somewhat frightening story about the lack of privacy and the possibility of preserving our lives only for ourselves which does no longer exist.

The topic of online privacy is one of the subjects on which lately a lot is talked about, but nevertheless in any place that knowledge is not as well synthesized as is the case in `Dragnet Nation'. The book in a fairly realistic and grounded way, `Dragnet Nation' talks about the loss of privacy in today's online world, gives a good overview for those who are not so skilled in handling the on-line services, while they heard something about the loss of privacy on-line.

Julia Angwin goes a step further and offers some very specific advice on how to increase online safety; her book is easy to read and although its story is about complex matters, the language she uses is comprehensible. The author begins his book begins with few simple sentences: "...An inside look at who's watching you, what they know and why it matters. We are being watched..." something you'll understand when her book will be fully understand, although the truth will probably shock you.

Julia Angwin avoided using complex technological knowledge and given that she speaks on the subject exceptionally interesting, with this book you will have no problem to read to the end in a one reading.

`Dragnet Nation' is a work written for those who are not tech geeks, but will certainly intrigue readers to read it quickly; inside there are no legal or technical terms, and these are, among others, the reason why we can recommend this book.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Privacy Concerns Matter, March 13, 2014
This review is from: Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance (Hardcover)
Journalist Julia Angwin writes meaningfully about invasions into our privacy. It happens more than you realize. There are ways though to avoid much of the intrusion into our personal lives. You'll probably never totally escape it, but much of the spying can be thwarted. Angwin shows how. She feels it is nobody's business where she goes, or the conversations she has, as long as she is obeying the law.

If you want to make a meaningful dent in the amount of personal information you are giving up, habits must be altered. Chances are you use Google for online searches. The author tells why you would be well-advised to switch over to DuckDuckGo. If you carry your cell phone with you, you might want to wrap it in aluminum foil. You might wish to purchase a wallet made to block radio frequency identification of credit cards. Maybe you would like to sign up for an email service called Riseup, where there's no scanning of messages.

There is widespread belief that we have nothing to worry about in terms of surveillance as long as we do nothing wrong. The fact is that few people are aware of just how much we are being watched. In today's world it is nearly impossible to hide from the spies. But why should government, or any other entity, watch everything you do if you have not done anything to warrant such intrusion into privacy? The question is very valid.

The author suggests that an Information Protection Agency is probably needed to protect us from the intrusions she discusses. She believes data handlers need to be made accountable for any harm done by use of our data. That sounds like a reasonable proposition. Angwin's book “Dragnet Nation” is an examination of the different ways we are being watched. After reading this book, I never again will quickly dismiss surveillance by the government or anyone else as being in my best interests.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not a how-to book, April 19, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
If you're looking for a simple list of suggestions on how to protect your privacy, you won't find it here. The book recounts the author's attempts to limit dissemination of her personal information, but without offering any succinct evaluation of what was "good, better or best." Instead, she tries various solutions and reports the results leaving it to the reader to judge whether the results are sufficient. The amount of research the author and her assistants conducted in order to gauge the effectiveness of various strategies is very impressive and, for the most part, interesting to read about. But, if one wants to exercise more control over who sees his personal data and when, he could get started on that effort much more quickly by simply searching the internet for short articles and blog postings offering suggestions.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Deep State: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly, March 23, 2014
This review is from: Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance (Hardcover)
Surveillance, whether conducted by governments (state, local, national) for "security" purposes, corporations (Amazon included) for profit motives, or even your next door neighbor using FAA-sanctioned, camera-equipped drones is an even more ubiquitous and delicious item than the Kardashians. So, anybody who is approaching Julia Angwin's book as a total ingenue with respect to mass surveillance must have made considerable and substantive efforts to avoid at least a cursory brush against the topic.

Large sections of "Dragnet" are reminiscent of the naive Dante being guided through the circles of hell by various sophisticated crypto-Virgils. There is little that's entirely new in "Dragnet Nation", but, nonetheless, Angwin's book is a valuable and, to the extent possible given the ongoing avalanche of new revelations, up-to-date resource. Certainly, the interested reader can find more comprehensive technical discussions (Bruce Schneier's "Cyrptogram" being a prominent example) and more polemical ones (Democracy Now!, for instance). There are more detailed legal perspectives (EFF and EPIC are two sources) and more acerbic commentaries (Atlantic's Connor Friedersdorf is good). But, for a single source, easily read (and sometimes anecdotal) synopsis, this book is near the apex of current publications. Others (Washington Post, The Guardian are two of them) have archived information of a more detailed nature.

The first chapter of "Dragnet Nation" was posted on Bill Moyers web site and, for those lacking the attention span or interest to read it, Moyers and Angwin review the entire piece in an on-line interview. There's also an extended interview on WNYC's Leonard Lopate show. The Moyers interview is perhaps the best place to begin to delve into the entire surveillance dilemma. Chapter 1 features a vignette involving Sharon and Bilal, an unlikely couple who discuss their personal medical "issues" on an internet forum whilst somehow imagining the interchange will remain "private". Angwin (intentionally or otherwise) thereby reveals a fundamental flaw in the entire public construct of "privacy" in the digital era: people share intimate and oftentimes mundane details of their personal lives, simultaneously expecting both publicity and privacy: this via a "free" and unabashed commercial intermediary. Facebook, Google Plus and numerous other companies (an Arizona basketball team, to cite but one of Angwin's examples) have been absolutely delighted to avail themselves of this treasure trove of information. So has just about every other entity that can (and will) profit from it.

The question now is what to do about surveillance...if indeed anything can be done at this point. Given the pernicious, symbiotic relationship between commercial enterprises and some of the more insidious aspects of general monitoring/surveillance, maybe not much. More alarming still is the "general shrug of public indifference" to the entire affair with a majority (over half) of Americans either unaware of or not caring about the topic at all (according to a recent Pew poll).

Angwin offers some options for anybody that wishes to simultaneously use the internet and maintain a modicum of "privacy". Some of her observations and advice are simply incorrect (see, for instance, p. 75: "Use Real Time Communications") and only a portion of that section (for example) was later invalidated by more recent Snowden document revelations. She has, regrettably, failed to provide specific implementation steps but provides plenty of excuses for not taking them herself.

As she points out, only an optimist or a dunce can believe that any of these measures will protect from the NSA or a dedicated and knowledgeable hacker/tracker, but by using DuckDuckGo and a conventional browser with one or more cookie blockers (Ghostery and Disconnect, for instance, are good), the prudent internet surfer will at least have an element of privacy during internet browsing. For the more dedicated anonymous path to internet access, try Tor which is compatible with all operating systems. ixQuick and StartPage are worthy of consideration. GnuPG, RetroShare, Adium, Pidgin (advantage of Retroshare: it's an "off the record" platform) and others will provide encrypted communications which are both open source and free to use. Some of these are "real time" and encrypted (RetroShare is also an F2F format for additional security) . Note, however, that even Glenn Greenwald (he of the Snowden revelations) required help with encryption so, at least as of now, some effort will be required to install and use these techniques. GPG will provide individual help. So will the Tor project (up to a point). I would avoid Whitehat's "Aviator" browser and Google Chrome when used with "Mask Me" (at least with Apple's OS), auto-accesses the keychain and saves sensitive passwords without user permission. Disable the Mask Me extension to avoid this.

Nothing short of legislative action will protect your public presence from license plate scanners, surveillance cameras and (soon) drones. Nothing will prevent the aggressive sharing of your data by commercial enterprises (credit card and other financial institutions, for instance) until legal proscriptions are put in place. Similarly, nothing will prevent Customs and Immigration from stopping people within around 100 miles of "the border" and interrogating them nor from attempting to seize your USB drives and computers. Other Fourth Amendment infringements are legion. Efforts to circumvent what remains of privacy and render functionally meaningless the hallowed "presumption of innocence" are mutating and evolving more rapidly than women's fashion. This is the Deep State and it has some "good" points (theoretically, helping deter terrorism and crime), bad (these are obvious) and ugly (these are blatant) aspects.

Julia Angwin's succinct presentation, occasional lists ("taxonomy") and focused style make a potentially "too technical" topic much more palatable and very interesting. Some sections of the book are a bit too anecdotal and verge on a Pollyanna-like perspective. For instance, she doesn't like "lying", even though she both quotes and paraphrases comments representative of her own position from former NSA senior cryptographer, Bill Binney to the effect that, "...the amount of data being assembled by the NSA was 'orders of magnitude' more than the world's most repressive secret police reimes, the Gestapo, the Stasi and the KGB", an observation that might possibly, maybe, potentially justify the occasional "misleading" statement, if not an outright lie to avoid entrapment, many instances of which she provides in the book. She's also prepared to take some steps (but not others) to preserve anonymity noting that "surveillance is not, in and of itself, a terrible activity." True enough, but given the penchant for the surveillance types to expand their reach, it may be tantamount to a "terrible activity", especially when applied in an indiscriminate fashion, such as here, in America, by our government and the coterie of private contractors/companies that gain tremendous profit from so doing. No?

If you can't spare the time, she posted a nice "what you need to know" synopsis on ProPublica's web site. Unfortunately, what she failed to post on-line or describe in detail in an appendix to her book is a step-by-step process that the concerned citizen can follow to implement her suggestions. Maybe nothing can be done anymore to restore anything more than a modicum of privacy, but at least you can read about and understand the broad scope of the problem in "Dragnet Nation" and rue your losses over an entertaining and well spent few hours.

UPDATE as of 07/2014:

A new secure e-mail client called "Virtru" is available. First, the good points:
1) It integrates with at least Chrome and Firefox and also runs on iOS and Android devices.
2) It is about the easiest of the encrypted e-mail programs. It allows "on-the-fly" (almost) encryption and it also prevents e-mail forwarding, if desired.
3) Curious about who the mail was forwarded to? It can tell you that, too.
4) It's free. Those are the good points and they are very good.

Here are the potential bad ones:
1) It uses a symmetric (one encryption/decryption key) implementation of AES-256 (Advanced Encryption Standard with a 256 bit key) and it's capable of 14 rounds.
2) Symmetric key systems are less secure than "asymmetric" ones like GPG (separate encryption and decryption keys).
3) The algorithm has been compromised, this shown as early as 2000 by Bruce Schneier. However, it's very difficult to attack, especially using 256 bit keys and 14 rounds
4) The safety of the program is unknown, as the source code is not (as far as I can tell) open and AES was developed by NIST (National Institutes of Standards and Technology) who has been known to work with the NSA (thanks to revelations from Edward Snowden). So, we don't know if the program is secure because (as far as I can tell), it hasn't been Virtru has not tested and it's not open-source.
5) The developers are former NSA personnel (in part) and who knows...this might be another spoof!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Just grasping the surface of surveillance, August 10, 2014
This review is from: Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance (Hardcover)
Julia Angwin’s Dragnet Nation serves as a review and check on the current state of surveillance. From corporations to advertisers to state actors, surveillance is a strong business. Angwin takes a broad look at how organizations surveil, analyze, profit, and target us. Unfortunately, much of this book is a starter guide. If you've read about privacy and security before, you'll recognize all the interviewees, software, and tips.

One unique angle begins with the development of a threat model. The author sets out to reduce her own online presence and increase her privacy. She describes building a threat model as a method for identifying adversaries. Essentially, this involves an analysis of your weaknesses and strengths that leave you vulnerable to penetration. Likewise, Angwin follows in the footsteps of a famed privacy and security expert, J.J. Luna. That individual describes some of the most important steps to creating a private life. As a reader, I thought this was one of the strongest points in the book: that she would continually interview the best crypto-privacy experts in the world.

She brings up a serious problem within the open-source movement. Developers run out of money and/or interest, and the open-source software often goes unmaintained. To counteract, or at least support those trying, Angwin decides to give money to those maintaining open-source software. I thought this was an inventive, educational, and important message to readers.

It bothered me how challenging she seemed to be about every privacy solution. As a journalist in this field, I would've thought she had experience and expertise with these technologies. There was a particularly strange section on passwords, too. When she’s creating a safe, larger entropy password, she doesn’t seem to understand that even if a password could be cracked in 7 hours, the hacker would need to have access to the encrypted, hashed file -- not something that major websites just hand out to hackers. Cracking software will automatically get blocked on major sites, and as such, a hacker wouldn’t even make it through the requisite time to hack the password.

Dragnet Nation doesn't adequately explain the fundamental gap between state actors (e.g., FBI, CIA, and NSA) or private companies such as Google and Facebook. I don’t think this book is alone in missing the gap, though. Writers and journalists are doing a good job when it comes to privacy conversations, but they don’t frequently differentiate the goals of each organization. The NSA wants to collect it all to analyze your data to see if you’re a threat (that threat varies across governments and could be used for questionable screening/practices). With a private corporation, they likely are interested in collecting data to better advertise and market to you. They’re looking to make a bigger profit for their shareholders -- not calculate your threat matrix.

Angwin's overall suggestion -- greater transparency in government and private corporations -- is exactly what America needs right now. While I did not find her tips and tricks to be particularly helpful (and perhaps already dated), her overarching messages and further light on problematic surveillance was insightful and important. Worth a read, but I might recommend Glenn Greenwald's book, No Place To Hide, for more expert advice and knowledge.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Join the Quest!, March 25, 2014
This review is from: Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance (Hardcover)
Judging from the number of sources citing excerpts from "Dragnet Nation" on a weekly basis, I'd say it's among the most topical of the decade. Angwin has put an enormous effort into research, mostly through her personal experience, to bring to the public an awareness of the massive number of privacy-invading techniques currently practiced and honed by both private interests and the government.

In fact, I was startled by the low number of reviews of this book, but then began to wonder if her message rang so true that readers were starting to reconsider the wisdom of posting anything online . . . ;)

As a fairly low-tech person, I've not been in a hurry to upgrade, and personal privacy has been a strong consideration for me. Angwin corroborates my fears. And I found it ironic when she critiques a security fix that takes 6 or 7 seconds to bring up a site, as compared with 1-2 seconds. When did we become so impatient? This restlessness is addictive and the stress is backfiring onto our health and wellbeing. We're losing the ability to sit still and think! And this impatience is leading to a trade-off: we are sacrificing our ability to seclude ourselves from the watchful eye of Big Brother.

What's most discouraging, and reflected by Angwin, is that this clipper ship has sailed, folks. Can we ever regain some semblance of insulation from prying eyes? Voyeurism is not the only danger . . . there is mischief afoot. The author cites many examples of how lives have been ruined, identities mistaken, people bankrupted and even imprisoned based on the relentless collection of personal data, much of it erroneous and therefore meaningless. Kind of ironic, considering how much money these data collection companies are charging for their information.

I admire Angwin's preference for security start-ups that seem cleaner, i.e. not associated with, nor represented by questionable private profit-making enterprises which could lead in the long run to selling out our public trust. She will choose the former even if slightly less efficient, and often donate to them, just to support the development of entrepreneurs unencumbered by any self-interest other than actually protecting our privacy.

I do agree with one other reviewer that the end of this book is a bit pollyana-ish. It bothered me to see her give up and trade off so easily. Certainly a public backlash is needed at this point. Snowden has set us well on the way, and people who still call him a traitor just aren't getting it. The man really had no other choice, except to remain silent.

And I'm disappointed at the number of personal friends to whom I've suggested this book, who politely listen, but you know that it's going to be just too much work for them to actually do some reading about this subject. Angwin talks about interviewing one Egyptian who was returning to the old country because he felt that there he could actually be freer from the constant spying. I don't know if Egypt is really that pristine, but it does reveal some anxiety about how naked our own lives in the U.S. have become.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining and insightful introduction without a happy ending, May 1, 2014
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This review is from: Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance (Hardcover)
I just finished this book, and I'll give it a "5." If nothing else, for effort. It certainly has become clear to me that a book like this cannot be all things to all people; the subjects involved are way too complex and diverse. However, it touches on many different aspects of the problem, gamely and nimbly walks the tightrope between many different views, and remains humane and entertaining.

For starters, she labors well to find a sane perspective on privacy vs. surveillance. Extremes of "people don't care about privacy" (one of Mark Zuckerberg's ill-advised yet telling quips) to the paranoia of the tin foil set are avoided; she addresses the problem conversationally from the perspective of one who is both a middle-American mom as well as a journalistic professional.

All but the most naive would suspect that there's something suspicious going on with our privacy, on or off the net. Yet, I suspect that most readers will be surprised by the depth of this problem. We can consider this a wake-up call as this is bound to get worse as Big Data, ever more sophisticated tracking and data mining technology as well as offline technologies (cameras, facial and image recognition, surveillance gear in the hands of anyone with a few bucks, various tracking chips and drones) are just beginning to hit their stride.

This is also a problem that runs the gamut of political views. Do you fear the "transparent president" with the big ears (literally and figuratively)? Or are you more than a little put off by the government-averse survivalist crowd? The dangers to our privacy, liberties and self-determination originate just as much from individual-rights grabs by liberal big-government power mongers as they do from conservative unchecked corporate laissez-faire advocates. As the book touches on, this is ultimately a problem crying out for legislative and judicial solutions. And it's no wonder that such efforts are either largely stalled or have produced legislation with no teeth (not to mention judicial confusion).

I enjoyed the author's personal ruminations on how to leave a smaller digital or non-digital data footprint, and why it matters. I also appreciate the effort she obviously put into scouring technological and technical solutions, as well as chatting up some of the key players in those areas. As many of the other reviews already mentioned, this is not a how-to manual. In fact, her struggles (even with the help of experts unavailable to the rest of us) illustrate how hard it is to effect technological changes as most of the tools available are difficult to use, sketchily supported, burdensome and only make a small dent into the overall invasion of our privacy. She also makes a good case why economics prevent more effective tooling. However, even the reader disinclined to expending the effort that the author did will find at least a few tools and techniques that they can use easily enough.

Reading this book has left me a sadder and wiser man. The dragnet problem is a lot worse than I realized before reading this book. I agree with the author that neither political nor comprehensive technical solutions appear forthcoming. On the positive side, I also feel that this book contains enough to inform one's attitude toward our own privacy, pick up a couple of tools (and financially support their producers and grow their industry) and maybe even add one's voice to privacy activism and the demand for sane political solutions. If that's not enough, the book is fairly entertaining and provides a painless introduction to a painful and bewildering subject!
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