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Dragon Tears Mass Market Paperback – February 7, 2006


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley (February 7, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425208435
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425208434
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (171 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #459,163 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The most ambitious of Dean Koontz's books. -- Columbus Dispatch

About the Author

Dean Koontz was born in Everett, Pennsylvania, and grew up in nearby Bedford. He won an Atlantic Monthly fiction competition when he was twenty and has been writing ever since. Mr. Koontz's books are published in 38 languages. Worldwide sales total more than 175 million copies, a figure that currently increases at a rate of more than 350 million copies a year. Dean and his wife, Gerda, live in southern California.


More About the Author

Dean Koontz, the author of many #1 New York Times bestsellers, lives in Southern California with his wife, Gerda, their golden retriever Anna, and the enduring spirit of their golden, Trixie.

Customer Reviews

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  • "Writing" 22
  • "Characters" 15
  • "Suspense" 11
  • "Action" 5
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Edward Hancock II on April 13, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
How do you kill what can not be killed? That is the question with which Harry and Connie must wrestle throughout the story that is Dragon Tears.

Yes there is a bit of the Koontz "formula" to this story, which is why I graded it 4 stars instead of 5...but this book is arguably one of my favorites. Unlike some of his other "formula" books (like the much-celebrated WATCHERS) I truly enjoyed the frights in this book. It was engaging and engrossing. If a reader doesn't get absolutely caught up in this chase.... well, I just don't know what to say.

Highly recommended!!!
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Serene Night on June 15, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Harry and Connie are L.A. homicide detective's ala the "Odd Couple." Harry is obsessively neat, and Connie is a messy dirty Harry type. Both characters are tracking a serial killer who brutalizes women. Harry's life takes an unexpected turn, when he encounter a strange hobo who tells him "Tick Tock You'll Be Dead By Dawn," thus begins a 12 hour Odyssey wherein Harry, Connie, and a rag-tag group of homeless pit their wits against a psychic serial-killer with a God-Complex.
Okay, I liked the first HALF of Dragon Tears. But after that it devolved into sheer Koontz formula.
For readers of Koontz, there really are no surprises in this novel. He uses the same formula in numerous other books. Lessee: There is a best friend who is a Hispanic cop. A Saintly single mom character. Quotations from the `book of Counted Sorrow,' a sentient dog, ranting about the apocalypse, mistrust of the psychiatric profession, and a serial killer who collects body parts... *Yawn.* How many Koontz books have elements similar to this?
The disappointing thing was I actually enjoyed the first HALF of the book. I liked the characters of Connie and Harry, but the second half contained way too much deus ex machina to be believed. And whatever happened to the first case Harry and Connie were working on? This subplot was dropped entirely. Disappointing. This was average Koontz. It might entertain readers who haven't read his backlist and for whom many plot elements are new...But for Koontz fans it contains no surprises...
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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Marcie on April 10, 2001
Format: Audio Cassette
I listened to Dragon Tears on audio and enjoyed it, but like another reviewer, it reminded me of other Koontz novels. It was a cool story idea, having a 20 year old man with supernatural powers try to rid the world of people he didn't feel deserved to be here. Like a homeless man and a woman and child living out of their car. When a police officer accidently ticked him off, he and his partner are the next in line. I thought Dean Koontz did a good job of making the apparitions scary, and the narrative by the dog was great. I love dogs, and this sounded like I would have imagined the dog to be able to think and talk. The only drawback was that I think the police officers figured out the whole plot way too fast. I would have never guessed what was causing the terrifying beasts to appear, or have been able to figure out who was behind it, but that's fiction and it was a fun listen. I like all of Koontz's novels, this wasn't my favorite, but I would recommend it to anyone who likes a little horror.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By The Tweeder on June 20, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
On the precipice of being a fine horror novel, Dean Koontz's "Dragon Tears" attempts to convey a very admirable message-that dire events or situations that may occur throughout life are only as horrible as they are perceived by those who they occur to-but falls flat on its face because of an outrageously dubious plotline. Similar to his last couple previous works such as "Hideaway", this work attempts to use an inhuman, prophet-like murderer from the Dark Side to torment the protagonists.
Police detectives Harry Lyon and Connie Gulliver are partners but could not be more different-Harry is consumed with order and balance, from his perfectly crafted color-coordinated closet to a strict daily routine that involves voluntary tedious paper work, while Connie embraces chaos, using it to fuel her aggressive craving to stop evil and make the world a better place. A Tuesday afternoon seems harmless enough, but Harry and Connie are summoned to stop a raging killer in a restaurant, leaving Harry to eventually shoot the perpetrator numerous times with his gun. Harry's day only gets worse from there, as a huge, disgusting street vagrant foretells him that he is going to die by sunrise and that all the people and things he cherishes are in danger as well. As dawn ticks closer and closer, Harry and Connie must comprehend all of these bizarre convictions before it is too late. What they discover is than a callous force believed to possess the strength of a god is out to make severe changes to the current world, one change being the exodus of the two detectives.
"Dragon Tears" brings in too many extraneous and fairly inconsequential characters into the narrative, especially the repeatedly used canine personification that is speckled throughout.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Milo on October 18, 2005
Format: Audio Cassette
Well it's an interesting concept in occult thrillers, and certainly well read by Jay Sanders, despite occasional lapses into boring monotone. His voice describing the world as seen through the eyes of a dog are hilarious. My complaint with this presentation is the meandering verbose style of the author that regularly has you screaming for him to get back to the story.

In the middle of crucial scenes he takes wordy diversions, through the voice of his characters. The ramblings are not always relevant, often preachy and irritatingly moralizing. By the time he has finished you have forgotten the point of the current episode or have lost the feeling of suspense. If ever there was an author in need of a good editor, this is a prime example.
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