Customer Reviews


196 Reviews
5 star:
 (132)
4 star:
 (37)
3 star:
 (16)
2 star:
 (6)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


126 of 138 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dragon's Crown: My Eyes Are Up Here
Final Fight, Knights of the Round, The Punisher, The Simpsons, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, X-Men, Golden Axe, Double Dragon, and of course, Dungeons & Dragons: Shadow over Mystara . . . any of these titles bring back memories-preferably fond ones? The beat'em up, as it's so aptly referred to, is a genre that had its heyday in the '90s, when arcades were still a thing,...
Published 12 months ago by Gabby_Jay

versus
29 of 38 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A cautionary tale
This review will be a bit different than my other reviews. Before I go any further, it's important to note that I didn't finish the game. I really wanted to like this game. I did everything in my power to fall in love with it. But when it was all said and done, Dragon's Crown did not meet my expectations. I want to be very specific in regards to who this review is...
Published 11 months ago by Leohlyon


‹ Previous | 1 220 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

126 of 138 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dragon's Crown: My Eyes Are Up Here, August 7, 2013
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dragon's Crown - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
Final Fight, Knights of the Round, The Punisher, The Simpsons, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, X-Men, Golden Axe, Double Dragon, and of course, Dungeons & Dragons: Shadow over Mystara . . . any of these titles bring back memories-preferably fond ones? The beat'em up, as it's so aptly referred to, is a genre that had its heyday in the '90s, when arcades were still a thing, TGIF was the best damn night in television, and Star Wars: Episode I had yet to ruin everything. It was a genre, along with fighters, that dominated my childhood, and while the past few years have been kind to fighting fans, fans of beat'em ups have had to sift through digital offerings for some of that mind-numbing, side-scrolling action.

Vanillaware, a purveyor of 2D games, such as GrimGrimoire, Odin Sphere, and Muramasa: The Demon Blade, has taken it upon themselves to fill the retail release void with Dragon's Crown (hereafter DC), a stately entry in the beat'em up genre, that also features a heaping of role-playing game elements, making the aforementioned Dungeons & Dragons: Shadow over Mystara its biggest influence.

DC opens at Dragon's Haven Inn, a tavern you'll frequent during your adventures. It's here where you'll choose a character, set your party, and report your progress. The characters available are all visually, and mechanically, distinct: an ironclad Fighter, who's a sword and shield favoring behemoth; the Sorceress, a witch who prefers to support the party, not so much her back; a Wizard, very much interested in melting faces; the Dwarf, a duel-wielding, goblin-chucking ball beard; the Elf, who's fey, swift, and a rumored Hunger Games fan; and finally, the Amazon, a warrior that consists exclusively of brawn, butt, and boobs. She's also adept at sundering skulls with her ax.

A few color schemes are available for each character, and you can change their name as you see fit. Japanese voices are also available if that's your thing, but only for your character. The remaining voicework is strictly in English.

After you've settled on your character, a tutorial awaits (which can be skipped for the subsequent playthroughs), and it does an adequate job of walking you through the basics. You'll also meet Rannie, a rogue; he'll accompany you throughout the game, and you can direct him to unlock chests or doors, while you focus on combat.

Leaving the tavern, you'll have a town to explore, though its faculties, such as the Temple, Magic Item shop, and Stable, aren't all available at the start. Locations open as you progress the story, and additional tasks are doled out at the Adventure's Guild, where you can learn skills (class specific and common) and accept quests.

The main story focuses on the eponymous Dragon's Crown, which allows its wearer to control dragons (of course). It all comes across a bit boilerplate, and it never strives for anything more. A narrator with an earnest delivery breathes some life into the tried and true material, though the narration is limited to the main quest only, so if you find yourself focusing on side-quests, you'll hear a particular phrase uttered repeatedly during your comings and goings in town, until you move onto the next story segment.

Fortunately, your comings and goings are consistently in gorgeous environments, populated with detailed secondary characters, and great interpretations of classical monsters, all with a multitude of influences sweeping throughout. DC references everything from The Nude Maja to Tinker Bell; Renaissance portraiture to Frank Frazetta's paintings; Jason and the Argonauts to Monty Python and the Holy Grail; and more. George Kamitani, Director, takes what should be an incongruous mixture of styles and creates something cohesive. It's pretty impressive stuff.

They're nine stages to conquer, and each has a branching path that becomes accessible after reaching a certain point in the story. Along with the two paths, you'll uncover secret passages and various quest specific situations as well. The locations vary from moss enveloped sanctuaries to desolated catacombs.

It's great the stages are engaging and fun to play through, because you'll revisit them, a lot, either for quests, or because the main story requires it. And, you won't have to do it alone. DC allows for four player simultaneous play, both local and online, although online play is initially locked. You'll have to unlock the stables to access the network, which is going to take around five hours.

Unfortunately, if you're playing on Vita, ad hoc mode isn't considered "local" play, and you'll have to unlock the stables to access any sort of multiplayer. Not a big deal if you don't have any friends; a big deal if you do.

Though, perhaps you have friends, but they're lame and don't like beat'em ups. Thankfully, you still don't have to go it alone. You can set the three player slots to AI controlled companions, and they're competent, for the most part. It may become a bit maddening to see them stroll into traps, or not effectively use items in their possession, but I've seen my friends do this too, so I'll cut my artificial ones some slack.

To keep the AI companionship fresh, you'll find piles of bones in the dungeons, which you can bury at the temple, or pay a fee, and resurrect instead. The resurrected characters will then wait for you at the tavern, all with varying gear. Even better, players you encounter online may be resurrected as well, meaning you can play offline with your friend's toon. It's also cool to know that someone may have resurrected you, and are questing with your character while you're at work thinking of playing Dragon's Crown.

It'll take around 15 hours to complete the game on normal, and after doing so, you'll unlock hard mode, which increases the level cap to 65; after you complete hard mode, you'll unlock the final difficulty level, and raise the cap to 99.

What's the point of grinding a character to level 99, when you can start the adventure anew with different class? Loot. What else? When it is all said and done, DC's draw is loot. Chests are scattered about the levels, and contain treasure which vary from E, the worst, to S, the best. Completing stages and defeating bosses not only yields experience points, but more loot as well.

Multiple bags can be purchased, meaning you can create different loadouts, which you'll need, since having gear with the proper attributes is important as difficulty increases; plus, gear breaks down with usage, and if you don't have back-up bags available, your S-Rank ax may be in no condition for another round, meaning you'll have to return to town, annoy your friends, and miss out on an amusing cooking game.

If you're on the fence which version to buy, I wish I could say there's a clear winner, but there isn't. Graphically, they're virtually identical, with the Vita version susceptible to noticeable slowdown when the action heats up with four players. The OLED screen makes a pretty game even prettier, but it's also small, so losing track of your character is going to happen.

But, the Vita version benefits greatly from the touchscreen. There's additional treasure hidden in the game, identified by glints; if you're playing the Vita version, you just tap the glint, and the treasure pops out. Runes eventually become available, and their magical properties can only be tapped by, that's right, tapping them. Also, if a player dies, and they're out of life points, you can spend gold to reanimate them, but you have to tap their portrait to do so.

How does the PlayStation 3 version compensate without touch controls? A cursor, which you manipulate with the right thumbstick. It is cumbersome to use, even when there isn't any action unfolding. But, having to fiddle with the right thumbstick, mid-battle, to bring your partner back to life? Urgh. Casting rune magic by moving it over three separate runes, spaced apart, while skeletons are hammering you? Double urgh.

In that sense, the game feels designed for Vita, or at least a controller with a touchpad (come on DualShock 4).

Of course, you can't play local co-op on a Vita, and if you have a roommate that's into these games, I'd deal with the cursor, and play it on PlayStation 3. Also, slowdown isn't an issue on PlayStation 3, and if you're sensitive to frame drops, the Vita version may be too much to bear.

If money isn't a concern, you'll be happy to know the games support cross-saving, though you'll be unhappy to know the games don't support cross-play.

Dragon's Crown is a rarity: a 2D side-scrolling beat'em up, with an unabashed artstyle, that's long. It isn't concerned that it'll take dozens of hours to complete with a single character if you wish to tackle all the difficulties; it doesn't care that you may be offended by the art; and it certainly isn't going to apologize if you don't see the appeal of grinding levels until it's simply time to go to bed. And it's all the better for it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


69 of 78 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fans of Golden Axe, rejoice!, August 6, 2013
By 
G. Denick (Somersworth, New Hampshire) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dragon's Crown - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
I spent countless hours playing Golden Axe on my Sega Genesis when I was a kid in the 90s. I played it pretty much every day after school, and it got to the point where I could blow through the whole thing in under twenty minutes, achieve the A+++ ranking upon completion, and only lose one or two blocks of health during the entire campaign. So why did I keep playing it, long after I had mastered it? The game was outrageously fun, that's why.

Dragon's Crown recaptures that type of fun for me perfectly. It's like Golden Axe, but with infinitely better graphics, sound, and most importantly: depth. Separating itself from the much older Golden Axe, your characters level in this game, they develop skills just like in any modern RPG, they acquire loot, and the techniques with which you combat the enemies continue to evolve as you become more experienced with how to play. Like Golden Axe, this game might seem like a mindless, button mashing brawler, but that's not true- for those who wish to develop their technique, this is a game that has oodles of depth and begs to be mastered by the devoted player. And, needless to say, nobody will be blowing through this game in twenty minutes - it's a lengthy, fascinating campaign.

Also noteworthy is the variety available in the character class selection, which will add tons of replay value for people like me who love to play these types of games. I'm currently using the Amazon, who is awesome, but I look forward to developing an enormously powerful wizard, and experimenting with the other classes as well. Like Golden Axe, this game is FUN - it's just that simple. I don't know if younger players who have been raised on different genres will enjoy it, but for anybody who was a fan of brawlers and beat `em ups, Dragon's Crown is a dream come true.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


44 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Some important details for potential players., August 9, 2013
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dragon's Crown - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
Let me get to the point, this game is a pure classic. Great for the summer as a nice couch co-op run for up to 4 players. If you reminiscence about those old-school side-scrollers like Golden Axe, TMNT, Streets of Rage, Double Dragon etc then this is the game you're looking for. Sure there are great side-scrollers on Xbox Live Arcade and Playstation Network (Castle Crashers, Scott Pilgrim vs the World, Phantom Breaker) but this game gives you a closer feel towards a modern Golden Axe.

There are a few things potential buyers should understand before getting this game. First off which might be the biggest gripe for people and their friends who buy this and expect to go home and play together is that you need to unlock online multiplayer. Its unlocked by the 9th level I think and it'll take a good 5 hours+, so expect to play alone that first night. Local co-op or couch co-op doesn't suffer from this, so they can join right away in the beginning tutorial level. The tutorial level is only for Player 1 so those who are using different classes might not know their entire basic moveset. Also if you decide to start fresh as a new character you need to complete the basic 9 levels again before unlocking online mode. The good thing is that your loot or bag is shared among all your characters.
Once unlocked you can basically join random games or random players join you, or you play with a friend. Problem with random players is that there's no voice chat, with friends you can send private chats and play. Meaning they might not be paying attention and holding a key that's detrimental to the level while doing nothing or they could be purposely doing it.

For a game that leads people to believe its more multiplayer than single player it's kinda eccentric. It's actually really tedious when doing a 4 player couch co-op run because each individual player has to accept their own quests, visit shops, utilize their skill points and ready their equips. For example, player 1 takes full control of the screen to handle his/her business then player 2 has to take control and so forth. It gets very tedious because after every level, each player wants to go add their skill points and change their gear which takes time so basically every player needs to take a turn doing things. They should have made a better interface where the screen is shared amongst all players. Also the loot is more oriented towards the first player.
During the gameplay when you're traversing through each level and each player is doing his/her own thing, it gets extremely hard to see where and what you're doing. You tend to get lost in the battle especially if a Wizard casts a flame spell that engulfs the whole screen. It's a minor problem to me but it does affect a few players out there who can't stand having their screen blocked, and trust me wizards/sorceresses have quite the flashy moves that take up the whole screen. By the time you see yourself after the spell is over you could be dead haha.

Speaking of death in the game, you start out with 2 lives and you can pay money to increase it, if you or your pals die within the game you can continue easily by pressing X and paying a small fee, I think 650? So luckily there are no game overs unless you're broke.

That's probably all the major downsides to this game that I can think of. Besides those small problems its great game. It's by Vanillaware and they make some great looking games, Muramasa the Demon Blade on the VITA is stunningly gorgeous. Each character plays differently, except for the wizard and sorceress, they both have the same weapon attacks but different spells.
The amazon is just a crazy berserker with low defense that's usually jumping everywhere smashing things. Warrior is your basic all around guy that has a shield and can defend. Dwarf is the little tank guy that has great def when he goes into immovable mode, holds hammers and can throw enemies. Elf is really fun, arrows are limited though so sometimes you can't always rely on using your bow too much. Wizard and sorceress are really fun with their wide array of magic spells, however their basic magic attacks are the same, just depends on what type of stave they are holding and what element it is. Both have different spells whereas the Wizard is more offensive and the Sorceress is suppose to be a support type. That doesn't mean she doesn't have any offensive magic, the sorceress can summon a giant boulder, a blizzard, or a thundercloud, then she has some fun spells like petrify and curse which turn enemies into frogs.

In the beginning each level is about 10 min more or less and after you beat it, a quest opens up which makes you basically repeat the level. Gets monotonous at first but you'll realize you actually need it to level up your character. At the end of every level is a boss fight and there are some amazing boss fights. There's not enough epic boss fights these days but this game delivers.

Other than what I've mentioned I don't wanna spoil any information so we'll leave this review as is. Overall its a great action-rpg side-scroller, definitely recommend. I just wanted to point out several things all potential buyers should know before they get this game. I didn't expect to have to go through over 5 hours trying to unlock online co-op.

One last note, this game makes me think of a 2D Gauntlet Legends side-scroller lol.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dragon's Crown is more than a game, August 13, 2013
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Dragon's Crown - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
Vanillaware is not a niche developer.

Dragon's Crown is not a niche game.

It is the culmination of what gaming would have been years ago without in the intervention of 3D graphics. Dragon's Crown, aptly named, is the resplendent prince of our gaming heritage. It's as if the Byzantine Empire had continued on in some alternate dimension and you could go there anytime you wanted just by turning on your TV. It's astounding design and execution nails a treatise on the oaken doors of the AAA gaming industry who have become the slaves of novelty and the mindless servants of their own avarice.

George Kamitani and his cohort have been reaching back not just to gaming classics, but into their own true creative artistry. Famously free of focus testing and without care for what is 'trending' in the industry these courageous people have been single-mindedly creating only the games they wanted to make since the 90s. Put another way, they were indie long before you could make console games without a major publishers involvement. Vanillaware is the weapon we can wield against the bloated, overwrought, incestuous and putrefying monsters called EA, Activision and Ubisoft as they attempt to distort and liquefy gamers into the stupid money machines they hope for us to become.

That said, this game is George Kamitani's single vision. Does that mean that his design may be off-putting to some? Certainly. You can't count me amongst those folks, but I can see their points. On the other hand if we demonized great film directors like Scorsese, Kubrick or John Schlesinger for the portions of their works we found offensive, we all understand we would be holding back the medium of film. Indeed, the fact that these elements made it into the final design of the game is proof of it's purity against the creeping creative death that seems to infect titles made these days.

Every dollar spent on Dragon's Crown is a vote for a future where the EAs and Microsofts must respect and more fully celebrate creativity. And every time you talk about or play Dragon's Crown with your friends is a moment where you are engaging more completely in the grand history of our hobby.

(see what I did there.. 'grand history'? :) Like Grand Knight's History?? ... release it anytime now guys plzthx!)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


29 of 38 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A cautionary tale, September 16, 2013
By 
Leohlyon (Saint Louis, MO) - See all my reviews
= Fun:2.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Dragon's Crown - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
This review will be a bit different than my other reviews. Before I go any further, it's important to note that I didn't finish the game. I really wanted to like this game. I did everything in my power to fall in love with it. But when it was all said and done, Dragon's Crown did not meet my expectations. I want to be very specific in regards to who this review is directed towards. It's not meant for those who may have played other beat'em ups recently, nor is it meant for the RPG lover. My review is meant to help the gamer(s) like me. The ones who enjoyed this type of game once upon a time ago, and are hoping to relive some of that Streets of Rage 2 and Double Dragon magic.

I played about 14 hours of Dragon's Crown, and the first several hours were fun. However, I started to become extremely bored once I realized I had nothing else in the game to look forward to. Perhaps I unfairly compared this to recent action games that I've played, who knows. But at any rate, I feel it's lacking in several areas, regardless of the genre. I enjoyed it the most when I was fighting alongside one other companion, as opposed to the recommended 3. Once I reached a point where I was pretty much forced to bring along 3 allies (due to the difficulty), the game started to go downhill for me. My character, along with 3 allies, and the various enemies is far too many characters on the screen at one time. I found myself just pressing the attack button over and over, without knowing where I was on the damn screen. This shouldn't happen, regardless of the genre.

The other major issue I encountered was the lack luster combat and poor weaponry choice. Hell, even old games like Streets of Rage 2 had better combat (I watched youtube clips to make sure I remembered correctly). I decided to play as the fighter class because I enjoy melee combat a bit more than magic attacks. The melee attacks were limited, and boring. In my humble opinion, if a game markets itself as a beat'em up, said game needs to hang it's hat on combat, and I don't think that happened in Dragon's Crown. As I mentioned, I didn't finish the game. But I'm willing to bet the fighter class never had the option to use another weapon besides a sword. After playing games like DmC, Darksiders, Castlevania, inFamous, God of War, etc - I need a little more.

Some of you may think I didn't finish the game because it's a side-scrolling beat'em up RPG, and that's not true. The truth is I didn't finish it because it's a side-scrolling beat'em RPG that wasn't very fun. If you haven't played this type of game since the 1990's, please proceed with caution because it may not be as nostalgic as you think. People that have already played the game or have a preconceived notion about it may not agree with my review, but my review is for those who are thinking Dragon's Crown is comparable to some of those old school classics, and it's really not. It's best for me to stop now because if I continue, I'll end up giving it a one star rating, and I really don't want to do that. Deadpool, you're up next!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fun, but has a few flaws, August 9, 2013
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Dragon's Crown - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
Dragon's Crown is a throw-back to the glorious days of side scroller beat-em-ups. The over-exaggerated style in all aspects (terrible to some, awesome to many others) flows well together with the insane combat and over the top magic effects for a bright and flashy game with simple yet deep and varied combat that makes one nostaligic for the quarter eating machines from days long past. The story is simple and is little more than a framing device, the soundtrack is fitting to the theme of the game, and the controls are very simple.

If you want a fun local co-op game right out of the box, go grab this now as it is one of the finest examples of the genere I have ever played. The online co-op, however, while running smoothly and very fun, isn't unlocked until you have completed all nine of the base missions of the game either solo, with a physical partner, or using AI controlled partners that you find throughout the world. The AI is kind of wonky with the partners, sometimes they will set-up traps and use their attacks brilliantly, other times they will stand in an easily avoided pillar of fire for 15 seconds until they die.

While you play you can control a cursor with the right analog stick to manipulate the enviorment slightly (tell a rouge to unlock a chest or door, find treasure by clicking on a shining bit of light in the background, examine runes, etc.) and it is a neat feature, but it is basically useless during combat on the PS3 and is probably the only way that the PS Vita version really shines over the PS3 version with its simple touchscreen interface.

The classes approach to combat is all highly varied. The Wizard punishes with high damage elemental attacks and near game breaking (at max level) spell that slows time down to a crawl for all enemies on the screen. The Sorceress summons skeletons, turns enemies to toads, and can produce food for the party allowing them to stay healed up. The Dwarf is a slow fighter with pretty weak defense but is ridiculously strong and can pick up even massive enemies and fling them at other enemies for pretty constant long distance high damage effect, get good at it and you can chain throw multiple enemies leaving the enemy ranks in tatters. The fighter is a tank in nearly all regards, able to offer up a circle of defense to all his partner, and having a load of fast (although very short ranged) attacks. The Amazon is high-risk, high-reward melee, her attacks flow well together and can do a lot of damage, but her defense is terrible and one really needs to read the battlefield with her to be effective, but once you get her down she will decimate scores of enemies. Lastly, the elf is the most well-rounded, a good combination of close range attacks and abilities mixed with solid damage with a bow from afar with different types of shot-styles available.

The game only has 9 levels, but you will discover new stuff nearly every time you visit those same levels and work your way to the boss at the end. Not just new treasure, but new paths you either missed or couldn't access before, side quests to help build your character up, and new enemies.

Dragon's Crown is a fantastic addition to a genre that hasn't had much high profil love in many years (Castle Crashers being the only co-op beat-em-up I can think of being made before it in recent years) and very well serves as one of the best examples that the oft-neglected genre has. I pinged it a point for being on the short side in terms of level variety, forcing you to essentially complete the main game before you can go online to play, if playing local co-op only the first player's story status will count and be saved. There are enough little complaints to keep this from being a perfect game, but if you want to slaughter some monsters with friends in a highly exaggerated fantasy brawler, you will get a lot of fun and love from this title.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Overhyped...Sold it today.., September 26, 2013
By 
TOKUSHI "TOKUSHI" (HUNTINGTON BEACH, CA, USA) - See all my reviews
= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Dragon's Crown - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
I was looking forward to this game since last year..

I bought it on the first day. Played one time through...

It is very repetitive. They should have more different moves, combos, and customization to the look. The character should have different look when wearing different armor/robe/boot/acc.

The only thing that shows the change in appearance is different weapons.

Also, I don't like the weapon/armor system in this game. Basically you dump your current weapon/armor after each level up.

Graphics and music are nice but the game play lacks of replay value.

Very disappointed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Didn't realize how much I had missed this genre!, August 15, 2013
By 
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dragon's Crown - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
For those of you older gamers who grew up in video arcades playing games like Golden Axe, Dungeons & Dragons: Tower of Doom, and even games like X-Men, TMNT: Turtles in Time, and Final Fight, Dragon's Crown scratches an itch like no other game to come around in a very, very long time. Vanillaware's newest work of beauty is a class-based beat em' up with RPG elements, an excellent character progression system, deep combat, and a very clever infusion of single player and co-op gaming. It's a game that appears quite simple on the surface, but after you spend some time with it, its depth and bountiful riches make it one of the surprises of 2013, and another fine entry into the PlayStation 3's library of exclusive games.

The game does a great job of quickly teaching you how to to play, on a basic level, whichever one of the 6 classes you choose to start with. One of the most impressive features of the game is how different each class is from one another. They move different, attack different, progress different, and feel completely distinct from one another. They are so distinct, in fact, that each class makes Dragon's Crown feel like 6 different games. Vanillaware has created a game that you will truly want to replay over and over just so you can try out each character. A serviceable, if unmemorable, story will guide you through each of the game's lush and beautifully hand-drawn environments. As in all Vanillaware games, everything you look at in the game is gorgeous. Animations are smooth and the designs are very creative, especially the absolutely incredible, epic boss fights. You'll find loot everywhere, and you'll constantly be returning to town between adventures to sell your gear, pick up sidequests, advance your skills, talk to the locals, recruit new adventurers to join you on your quest, and receive blessings from the gods. The game creates an very nice dynamic this way between questing and visiting the town, and should make RPG fans feel right at home.

Dragon's Crown's co-op system works brilliantly, even if its execution is a bit sloppy. Once you reach a point in your character's story, the option to go online and let other players join your game becomes available, as does your ability to hop into other players' games. There has been some criticism at the fact that the game doesn't unlock online co-op until you progress to a certain level in the story, but I found this to be an excellent idea. The game can be quite challenging, and it's good to know that players who join your game are most likely quite competent at playing their characters. Co-op is a blast, and your partners are usually much more useful allies than the AI that accompanies you in solo play. On the flipside, jumping into other peoples' adventures is a great way for your character to get higher levels of XP and better loot, and makes for a nice distraction from your own single player game, giving the whole experience a good sense of variation. What Dragon's Crown really needs and doesn't have is a lobby. There is no way to send in-game invites to your friends, and grouping up takes some coordination from all involved. A more organized way to group up would have worked wonders for the game.

Overall, Dragon's Crown is a fantastic, extremely addictive game that draws you in with its beauty, depth, and very high fun factor. It is fun in the same way those late 80's/early 90's arcade games were, but it also finds a way to bring in all the modern sensibilities you expect from today's games without intruding on that special something that makes beat 'em ups such a special part of the gaming universe. Dragon's Crown is a game like no other, and even with its flaws, it stands as one of the most memorable games on the PlayStation 3.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic game, May 29, 2014
This review is from: Dragon's Crown - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
I've heard a lot of bad hype about this game being sexist, what with the female characters having enormous busts and all, but never have I heard anyone say anything bad about its gameplay. And this is because it is AWESOME.

First of all, I'd like to address the sexism issue. Sure, the sorceress has an impossibly large rack, and the game's artwork is loaded with busty females, and I confess that when I first played the game I was a little off-put by the sheer amount of boobage this game displays. So yeah, I can definitely see people being offended by it.

However, I just dealt with it (because the game is so much fun) and after playing it for a while I began to find it more funny than anything. The more offensively expository bits of artwork are so over-the-top that I find them hilarious. And since most of the busty girls in this game are kicking some serious @$$, it doesn't feel like the game is objectifying women so much as celebrating the female anatomy, or at least that's how I feel about it. I dunno, maybe I just got desensitized, but my girlfriend plays the game with me and she doesn't see anything wrong with it either. Also, a friend of mine mentioned that scantily clad buxom women have been an indispensable part of the Sword and Sorcery genre for decades, and that this game is only putting its own spin on it. Whether or not you agree with that is up to you, but it is what it is. Besides, you don't hear anyone complaining about the dwarf, and he goes shirtless!

SO ANYWAY, the gameplay itself is phenomenal. The action is fast-paced and the controls are very responsive, and they included a lot of clever features to everything. At pretty much any time you can use the right control stick to bring up a cursor that you use to activate runes, search for treasure, or interact with the environment and characters, which is a really nice touch. Combat uses a collection of skills that you purchase with Skill Points that you earn by leveling up or completing bonus quests. These skills include special moves and character buffs, and they can be purchased multiple times to increase their potency.

There are six character classes to choose from in all: the Dwarf, the Amazon, the Elf, the Wizard, the Fighter, and the Sorceress. Each one has a radically different fighting style and uses different equipment, although many pieces of equipment are shared by two or more classes. For instance, the Dwarf can store bombs and pick up and throw bad guys, while the Amazon can berserk and perform spinning double-jumps while wielding her battle-axe.

The graphics in this game are amazing. If you've never played a Vanillaware game, prepare to be stunned. Everything looks like an oil painting come to life, and the results are gorgeous. Vanillaware is aware of how good its artwork is, and offers tons of artwork as a bonus for completing quests.

The only major complaint I have about this game is that at times there is so much going on on-screen that you lose track of your character, and this can be quite a pain. This is especially a problem when you have multiple players using the same character class and you start following the wrong Amazon or Dwarf before realizing you're controlling someone else.

I can also see people getting bored with the same nine stages, although each stage has an "easy" and "hard" route, each with a different boss at the end, so I personally never got bored. Still, after a certain amount of playing, the game starts randomizing which stage you pick to play in (unless you pay for a carriage in-game), which I can also see people getting frustrated over.

Other than that, it's a very fun and reasonably challenging experience. If you like action games, then strap yourselves in and get ready to let it all hang out because this game is awesome.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Meh, September 16, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dragon's Crown - Playstation 3 (Video Game)
Pretty straight forward beat-em-up. Fun with a friend. 4-player makes it difficult to enjoy / follow the gameplay. Hit detection is kinda wonky. Playing this just made me wish I was playing Muramasa instead.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 220 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Dragon's Crown - Playstation 3
Dragon's Crown - Playstation 3 by Atlus (PlayStation 3)
$29.99 $24.61
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.