Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Drama and Pride in the Gateway City: The 1964 St. Louis Cardinals (Memorable Teams in Baseball History)
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VINE VOICEon October 30, 2013
A number of years ago the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) began partnering with the University of Nebraska Press to produce a series focused on “Memorable Teams in Baseball History.” Drama and Pride in the Gateway City: The 1964 St. Louis Cardinals is one volume in this series. It is largely a collection of biographical sketches, along with chronological discussions and a commentary on the World Series between the Cardinals and the New York Yankees in 1964. In terms of biographies, these are very solid ones. We will learn the basics about the stars of the team, especially Hall of Famers Bob Gibson and Lou Brock, as well as the other players and the coaching staff.

Perhaps the best short biography I have read of Curt Flood is contained in this book. Written by Terry W. Sloope, this essay captures well the enigma of the sensitive player who believed the MLB operated a plantation style labor system. When traded from the Cardinals to the Philadelphia Phillies after the 1969 season, Flood resented that after giving the Cardinals his best for twelve seasons he had still not earned the right to be a part of any decision that affected him so fundamentally. Since the Cardinals no longer wanted him, Flood challenged the MLB “reserve clause,” a seemingly inviolate section of all players’ contracts that allowed the team the right to reserve the services of their players for the next season even without a signed contract. While the contract and the player signed to it could be traded, a player could not unilaterally choose to play for another team even if he did not have a current signed contract. While Flood’s challenge of this system failed, he cracked open a door that would lead to free agency in less than a decade.

The bulk of this book is given over to player, coaching staff, front office and ownership, and broadcasting biographies. These are all useful and some of them, such as the piece about Curt Flood, are outstanding. The remaining chapters relate the course of the 1964 season, the World Series, and the aftermath of the Cardinals in the sixties. Finally, I should mention that while many SABR members are interested in the use of advanced statistics to reveal hidden elements of play on the field, this book does not really contribute much along those lines. I do not mention this as a negative for this book; only to note that anyone who is seeking that type of analysis will not find it here.

Overall, it is a very creditable work, one that should find its way to the shelves of anyone seriously interested in the history of the St. Louis Cardinals.
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on January 2, 2015
How the 1964 St. Louis Cardinals came from behind late in the season to not only win the NL pennant, but bump off the Yankees in a good seven game World Series. Every player is profiled herein & there it does get somewhat redundant. Otherwise, ACES!
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on February 4, 2015
Baseball in the 60s is unparallelled. The 1964 series was classic as the last appearance of the Yankee dynasty that had begun in the 1920s. Great teams and great players, many of whom would be Hall of Famers if they played in later decades. This book is for the baseball aficionado who had an interest in players great and small as it provides biographies of every player who was on the Cardinals roster during the 1964 season, even if for a few games. It traces each player's roots and highlights their entire career besides how they contributed to the Cardinals championship season. It also follows each player's life up to 2011. Particularly noteworthy is the troubled life of the multi-gifted Curt Flood and where it led after baseball. You will learn many facts about these players that you were unaware of. This is a fantastic book. The SABR series is fantastic! I have also relished the SABR book on the 1960 Pittsburgh Pirates
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on September 16, 2013
I'd forgotten a few of the Cardinals that were traded back then or didn't last. I was only 12. I did remember getting Glenn Hobbie from the Cubs. However over all they pieced together a lot of information about them all that was great to read.
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on October 15, 2013
I bought this book for my 50-year-old brother last year for his birthday, and he was amazingly grateful for it (usually very hard to buy for). We grew up St. Louis Cardinals fans (and still are), so we all enjoyed thumbing through it. There are wonderful photos in it! A must-have for any Cards fan! Tess M.
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on December 13, 2014
Great historical reading for a Cardinal fan.
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on February 10, 2014
If you were a baseball fan in 1964, or you are a fan of baseball history, you will love this book! There is a magazine-type article on each of the players on the 1964 Cardinals roster, even the obscure players. It's an entertaining trip back in time.
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on September 4, 2014
A nice keepsake for Cardinal fans
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on October 28, 2013
1964 was a watershed year in U.S. history. Between social and scientific changes afoot in the land, sports was changing, too. I was a 10-year-old lad when the 1964 World Series was played. While I rooted for the dynastic New York Yankees (I still do), the Cardinals inspired awe! And like all things in nature, everything has its opposite: Day and night, matter and antimatter, Yankees and Cardinals. The Cards have proven that they are the 'dynasty' of the National League. This book will help you understand how the new Cardinals came about and how they helped quell the mighty Yankee powerhouse in that far away, yet endearing year of 1964.
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on May 17, 2013
Excellent!

Very satisfied, exactly what I anticipated. Product was received timely and in excellent shape. Price was very fair. Overall experience was great.
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