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Drama Extra tracks, Original recording remastered


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Drama
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Audio CD, Extra tracks, Original recording remastered, February 24, 2004
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Yes are an English rock band who achieved worldwide success with their progressive, art, and symphonic style of rock music. Regarded as one of the pioneers of the progressive genre, Yes are known for their lengthy songs, mystical lyrics, elaborate album art, and live stage sets. No fewer than 18 musicians have been a part of the band's line-up, with its current form comprising singer Jon ... Read more in Amazon's Yes Store

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Drama + Tormato + Going for the One
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (February 24, 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Extra tracks, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Elektra / Wea
  • ASIN: B00009Z576
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (206 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #11,928 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Machine Messiah
2. White Car
3. Does It Really Happen?
4. Into The Lens
5. Run Through The Light
6. Tempus Fugit
7. Into The Lens (I Am A Camera) (Single Version)
8. Run Through The Light (Single Version)
9. Have We Really Got To Go Throught This
10. Song No.4 (Satellite)
11. Tempus Fugit (Tracking Session)
12. White Car (Tracking Session)
13. Dancing Through The Light
14. Golden Age
15. In The Tower
16. Friend Of A Friend

Editorial Reviews

No Wakeman or Anderson on this 1980 LP, which still hit #18! This hard-rocker featuring Tempus Fugit now has 10 bonus cuts including unissued single versions and tracking sessions.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

126 of 130 people found the following review helpful By Alan Caylow on June 20, 2004
Format: Audio CD
For most fans, Yes without lead singer Jon Anderson is a horror thought. But as history has shown, Anderson did leave the band after the tour for the "Tormato" album, with keyboard wiz Rick Wakeman in tow, and they were replaced by the duo known as The Buggles---vocalist Trevor Horn, and keyboardist Geoff Downes. Their only album with Yes, 1980's "Drama," is a surprisingly good album. While no one on God's given Earth can sing like Jon Anderson, Trevor Horn sings close enough (albeit in a *slightly* lower register), and he takes Anderson's place at the mic just fine. These days, Trevor Horn may be to Yes what George Lazenby is to the James Bond movies (i.e. he only made one, *and* he was filling a very large pair of shoes), but give the guy some credit: he was good! Geoff Downes, meanwhile, is a more than capable keyboardist for this classic English rock outfit, and he & Horn slot in alongside Chris Squire, Steve Howe, & Alan White very well."Drama" is a very short album---just 35 minutes---but in those 35 minutes is some great Yes music, the highlights for me being "Does It Really Happen?," "Into The Lens," and "Tempus Fugit," all top-notch, first-rate Yes rockers. Seriously, with all due respect to the great Jon Anderson, I would've been quite happy if the "Drama" line-up of Yes had decided to continue. And they might have---by all accounts, they were received quite well by U.S. audiences on the tour for the album. Unfortunately, British & European audiences were not so kind, and, subsequently, Trevor Horn got cold feet about continuing on as the group's frontman. Well, I can't really blame him.Read more ›
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52 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Paul Allaer TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 16, 2004
Format: Audio CD
The "Drama" album will always be somewhat of an oddity in the Yes catalogue, for no other reason that it is the only album in Yes' 35 years that does not feature leadsinger Jon Anderson. If, however, you can get beyond this, you will discover that "Drama", much like its predecessor "Tormato" is actually a lot better than belies its reputation.
The "Expanded and Remastered" version of Drama (16 tracks; 79 min.) starts of with the original 6 tracks of the album. Among the best tracks: "Machine Massiah" is a return to the 10 min. epic tracks of earlier in their career, albeit with the guitars much more upfront. "Into the Lens" is an 8. min. romper (and later was redone as "I Am a Camera" by the Buggles). "Run Through the Light", a minor hit, is a super-catchy power-ballad.
The bonus tracks go from the unnecessary (single versions of "Into the Lens" and "Run Through the Light") to the mildy interesting (instrumentals "Have We Really Got to Go Trough With This" and "Song No.4 (Satellite)", to the fascinating last 4 tracks. Those tracks are from the Roy Thomas Baker (famed for producing Queen era-"Bohemian Rhapsody") sessions with Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman from the Fall of 1979 that eventually were abandoned. It gives a nice insight to what might have been the "logical" successor to "Tormato", but assuming that these tracks in fact were the best from those sessions, it's easy to see why the band didn't pursue them. "Golden Age" is the standout song of the four.
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39 of 42 people found the following review helpful By woburnmusicfan on August 2, 2004
Format: Audio CD
After the lackluster "Tormato" went splat and Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman left the band, Yes made the unlikely move of adding singer Trevor Horn and keyboardist Geoff Downes from the two-man new wave band the Buggles (of "Video Killed the Radio Star" fame) for this 1980 album. And while Chris Squire has referred to the Horn/Downes era as one of the low moments in the band's history, the one album that came out of it is actually very good. Horn makes an endearing attempt at Anderson's vocal style (though he strains at the high notes) and contributes his excellent production abilities, while Downes makes a credible keyboard wizard. Their new-wave sensibility helped perk up the beats back to rock tempo after the laziness of "Tormato", and by throwing a touch of pop back into the Yes mix, set the stage for the band's "90125" success. "Tempus Fugit", keyed by a tremendous Squire bass line, is one of the great Yes songs of all time, up-tempo and up-mood; in the Boston area, this song got Yes its most radio play since "Roundabout". By rights, it should be on any Yes "best-of" album. "Into the Lens" takes a core pop song (later simplified as "I Am a Camera" on the Buggles' "Adventures in Modern Recording" album) and surrounds it with a repeated, soaring Steve Howe guitar melody over a stutter-stepping rhythm section. "Machine Messiah" is another strong piece that allows both Howe and Downes to shine. "Run Through the Light", a relatively straightforward rocker, and the proggish "Does This Really Happen?" are weaker cuts. "Does This Really Happen?" gives Alan White a chance to play vibes.Read more ›
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