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on May 10, 2005
I was 16 when this album was originally released in the very cold winter of 1977. At the time there was no MTV, no videos, nothing. If you wanted to see a band you had to go see them live, if you were lucky enough. We didn't know the band was having major drug problems, we didn't care. We were much too caught up in our own adolescent crazyness. It is just too easy to speak in hindsight and criticize this album based on recent magazine articles or VH1 programs. The simple fact is this: This album kicked ass in 1977, and it kicks ass today. We played it to pieces. Instead of rating it on the personal problems that the band was having, rate it against the crap that has come out since.
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on December 10, 2009
When I hear all of the bad reviews for "Draw the Line" I completely diasagree with them. The title track is pure hard rock with an attitude and great guitar by Perry. "Kings and Queens" is brilliant and is also one of my favorite Aerosmith songs .Their remake of "Milk Cow Blues" is fantastic cover. Other songs like "Critical Mass" and "Sight for Sore Eyes" are great songs with Steve Tyler's voice screechin' through it all (except for Joe Perry's first vocal appearance in "Bright Light Fright" which isn't bad at all). The only song that sticks out as only "o.k." happens to be "The Hand that Feeds," but 8 out of 9 sure isn't bad. "Draw the Line" might not have been ground-breaking like the two Aerosmith albums before this, but it sure is entertaining!!
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on June 30, 2011
When deciding whether to buy this album, I noticed that it didn't have any classic rock radio staples ala "Dream On", "Sweet Emotion", or "Back In The Saddle" to anchor it. I also saw many reviews that said this album is where the band's addictions began to make them lose focus. However, after reading about how the band members spent their spare time driving their Trans Ams, firing their guns, and partying non-stop during the recording of this album in the Summer of '77 in New York City, I had to hear for myself what the end product of such crazy recording sessions would sound like. I am really glad I gave "Draw the Line" a shot! This album is excellent! I love to blast "Get it Up" when I'm driving, killer guitar and powerful vocals on that one. I also love the punchy, tough-sounding "Sight For Sore Eyes". The songs "I Wanna Know Why" and "Draw the Line" are also fun, loud, driving songs in the mid-70s Aerosmith style. Moreover, even the experimental songs like the powerful, prog-rock-style "Kings and Queens", and the wild Replacements-sounding "Bright Light Fright" work well here in my opinion, and tie the album together, giving it some variety. The other songs, "Critical Mass", "Milk Cow Blues" and "The Hand That Feeds" are okay, certainly not bad. After finally discovering this album just a couple of months ago, I can easily say that "Draw the Line" is the last of 4 essential 70s Aerosmith albums (the others are "Rocks", "Toys in the Attic" and "Get Your Wings" - I own and love all of them btw). I've been blasting the "Draw the Line" album all summmer so far, very underrated and a lot of fun!
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on August 10, 2002
When I hear all of the bad reviews for "Draw the Line" I completely diasagree with them. Sure, it may not be on the same line (no pun intended) with "Toys in the Attic" or "Rocks," but this album doesn't deserve all of this bad hype I hear about it. The title track is pure hard rock with an attitude and great guitar by Perry. "Kings and Queens" is brilliant and is also one of my favorite Aerosmith songs (with a LIMITED FEW songs I like more). Their remake of "Milk Cow Blues" is fantastic and is my favorite cover Aerosmith has ever done ("Walkin' the Dog" and "I'm Down" are close though). Other songs like "Critical Mass" and "Sight for Sore Eyes" are great songs with Steve Tyler's voice screechin' through it all (except for Joe Perry's first vocal appearance in "Bright Light Fright" which isn't bad at all). The only song that sticks out as only "o.k." happens to be "The Hand that Feeds," but 8 out of 9 sure isn't bad. "Draw the Line" might not have been ground-breaking like the two Aerosmith albums before this, but it sure is entertaining!!
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VINE VOICEon December 15, 2005
Originally released in 1977, as I remember the very day this lp came out. Not as outstanding as their landmark albums 'Toys In The Attic' or 'Rocks', but still a very much of decent effort. Tracks I dug the most were the opening title cut "Draw The Line", "Kings And Queens", the blues-like "Milk Cow Blues" and the late night FM radio (at that time anyway) "Sight For Sore Eyes". Nice to pull off the shelf and give a spin every now and again.
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on November 17, 2013
This album brings back a lot of memories from 1977 and the following years. I had cut my young Hard Rock teeth on "Toys In The Attic" and was looking very forward to the upcoming Aerosmith release of "Draw The Line". For whatever reason, I was never aware or familiar with "Rocks" until years later...don't know why or how I missed that. I recall getting my cassette version of "Draw The Line" from Columbia House Records and rushing to my cassette deck to play it. "Draw The Line" caught my attention on the first play as did "Kings And Queens"..."Kings..." is still my favorite song on the album. I wasn't so impressed with the rest of the album though, just didn't get the attitude or what they were selling at that moment. The album just didn't match up with what I was Xpecting after listening to "Toys..." 147 tymes. But, I kept listening to it and as tyme moved along and I started having memories to associate with this album, it grew on me. By the tyme I got off to college in '80 and had the money to buy a new car cassette stereo for my '73 Riviera I knew I wanted the first song to be played was "Draw The Line", don't really know why but there was something about that song that I thought deserved the first play. I've come to love every song on this nine track album, maybe its just me and my personal memories or maybe it is really a good album that just took my young brain a while to grasp what the boys were laying down. I can't really answer that, you'll have to take your own chance and see what it does for you. "Critical Mass" is a hard rocker that took me awhile to cozy up to. "Get It Up" starts off with some cool sounding slide guitar, that maybe I just didn't get the connection to the blues at that tyme...but it rocks my boat now!! I guess this album caught me at a stage when I thought Rock was Rock and everything else was S&#*...but I was 15, didn't even have a drivers licence, so really what were my real life Xperiences...this album actually helped me to start realizing that the Rock that I loved had some roots in the Blues...gotta understand, I really didn't know who Led Zeppelin was at this point in my musical journey. "Bright Light Fright" rocks pretty hard, but when I first heard it, it was the horn section that caught my attention and turned me off...I get it now and really like hearing that track. "Kings And Queens" is so different than anything I'd ever heard Aerosmith do or ever do since...it almost seems Steven was trying to write something that maybe Deep Purple, Rainbow or some other English band would have done. I'm not going to try and give a personal ranking of Aerosmith's songs, but "Kings..." is one of my personal favorites, it just takes me to another place...wish they'd done a few more with that feel. "Milk Cow Blues" was probably the song that disappointed me the most on my first listen...but, as I've grown older and Xperienced so many other musical styles...I appreciate this remake rendition, just wish I'd of gotten it back then. "The Hand That Feeds" was probably the third song that caught my attention on the original listen back in '77...this one rocks hard...or, what we called Hard back then...good guitar, good vocals , good lyrics, good attitude!!!!

Free Hugs!!
&
Keep A Rockin' In The Free World!!

Changin' The World One Ear At A Tyme!!
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VINE VOICEon July 11, 2013
Aerosmith's "Draw The Line" is somewhat like the Rolling Stone's "Exile on Main St." (no, wait! Here me out!) in that its not an album with an abundance of hooks, but it IS an album with a tremendous sense of groove and flow and mood. The album works as an album better than it does as individual songs.

In that respect, it is probably not the best Aerosmith album to first buy as an introduction to the band (just listen to everyone in the world and buy "Rocks," it really truly is that good).

However, if you want something with fuzzy hazy guitars, an occasionally funky beat, and just a hypnotic groove from start to finish, this is a GREAT album. It may take a few listens to tell all the songs apart, but that goes the same way for "Exile on Main St." and everyone says that's a classic (it is!). The band really locks in tight on this one, and its a joy to listen to from start to finish. A great record for driving down the highway, and a great Aerosmith record all around.
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on April 10, 2016
Made at the extreme peak of their addiction and probably the last great collaborative effort they made, DTL is a definite turning point in their career. Next to the amazing Rocks it's a stand out for sure. There are still some truly inspired moments on this one though.. Kings and Queens, Sight for Sore Eyes, and the title track are stand outs. It's still like every other Aerosmith album before it though and you can put it on and not skip a single track. For as much as the addiction problems may have been affecting their personal relationships it definitely hadn't affected their talents. Made right before the original bands demise it's probably the last gasp of greatness from the original line up.... Especially considering what they'd become after reforming in the 80's. *****
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on April 19, 2014
Let's face it: any Aerosmith album that follows the titanic masterpiece that is "Rocks" is guaranteed to be viewed as a disappointment, especially by fans who never actually listened to the album. And it's true that "Draw the Line" literally draws the line in not breaking any new ground and adding musical invention to the mix. But you know what? Who cares? The album is still good. It still rocks. And it still excites the senses.

Most of the material from "Draw the Line" holds up very well. The opening title track is still one of Aerosmith's most sizzling gems in their entire canon, a full-throttled anthem that culminates in Steven Tyler's riveting scream. The next three songs, "I Wanna Know Why", "Critical Mass" and "Get It Up", are good, old-fashioned rock n' roll boogies that wouldn't be out of place in "Get Your Wings". And Aerosmith's cover of Kokomo Arnold's "Milk Cow Blues" is surprisingly effective, infusing the original with the kind of grit, greasy riffs and smartass Stones-like attitude that defined Aerosmith's music in the 1970s.

But the centerpiece of "Draw the Line", without a doubt, is "Kings and Queens", one of Aerosmith's most heart-wrenching and emotionally powerful power ballads. Forget that god-awful Diane Warren love song from "Armageddon". If you want to a REAL tearjerker, listen to this track. From Steven Tyler's soaring vocals and exhilarating guitar work to the gentle piano flourishes in the second half, this song hits you like an arrow through the heart. It is so good that one is willing forgive the weaker tracks on the album.

And there are, indeed, weak tracks on "Draw the Line", some that feel like leftovers from the band's previous records. "Sight for Sore Eyes" plays like a derivative sequel to "Walk This Way", without the innovative rap-trap delivery that launched that song to immortality. "The Hands That Feeds" sounds like a rehash of "Lick and a Promise". And "Bright Light Fight" is a disappointingly uninspired effort by Joe Perry, a far cry from the far superior "Combination". At around the same time of "Line"'s release, Aerosmith were working on an excellent non-album single called "Chip Away the Stone" and if they had discarded two filler tracks and insert that song, "Draw the Line" would have probably equaled "Get Your Wings", if not "Rocks".

Fans and critics are right. "Draw the Line" is a creative step down from "Rocks", but it's not to be dismissed either. Unfortunately, this would prove to be the last good album Aerosmith would make in the classic period as the band temporarily splintered, leading to two below-average offerings ("Night in the Ruts", "Rock in a Hard Place") before reuniting for their spectacular comeback in the 1980s. Don't let the negative hype fool you. "Draw the Line" is good, better than you may expected, and there's a lot of fine material here to make it worth the purchase.

Recommended.
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on November 12, 2003
In 1976 Aerosmith was at their creative peak and released the album Rocks. In 1977 the drugged up band struggled in the studio to come up with material. The result, Draw the Line, isn't nearly as good as Rocks but it is still a pretty good album. I think this album still holds up and makes a good listen.
1. Draw the Line. 10/10 Gets the album off to a great start. This is a classic Aerosmith hard rock song. Steven's screaming in the middle is amazing.
2. I Wanna Know Why. 8/10 Pretty good song but not the best.
3. Critical Mass. 8/10. Sounds like a doped up Beatles song.
4. Get it Up. 9/10 I like how funky this song is. One of their funkiest.
5. Bright Light Fright. 3/10 Joe Perry takes a turn at the mic and shows he can't sing. Very punkish, but doesn't sound good like real punk from the time. (Ramones, etc)
6. Kings and Queens. 9/10 Very good song and among thier most popular from this era. The keyboard, Guitar interplay works really well.
7. Hand That Feeds. 7/10 Decent song that allows them to add a little funk.
8. Sight For Sore Eyes. 8/10 I love the very funky Guitar intro. It is just a fast fun song.
9. Milkcow Blues. 8/10 Amped up cover of an old song. A good tune to close the album with.
This is a worthy CD for any Aerosmith fan. Not the best place to start if you are just building your Aerosmith collection. Start with Toys in the Attic or Rocks. Either way get this album.
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