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Draw Manga: How to Draw Manga In Your Own Unique Style Paperback – June 1, 2005


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Paperback, June 1, 2005
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Draw Manga: How to Draw Manga In Your Own Unique Style + Manga for the Beginner: Everything you Need to Start Drawing Right Away! + Mastering Manga with Mark Crilley: 30 drawing lessons from the creator of Akiko
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Collins & Brown (June 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1843401886
  • ISBN-13: 978-1843401889
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #641,396 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Bruce Lewis is a professional cartoonist, illustrator, writer, teacher and pop culture enthusiast and was one of the first professional comic artists to bring the manga-style to American comics. His latest work appears in Juku: A Comics Album (2002, Cheap Disposable Entertainment). Bruce lectures in manga illustration throughout the US and holds extremely popular manga drawing workshops. He lives in Texas, USA.

Customer Reviews

Very in-depth with complementary real life scenarios in the world of comic developing.
Little Bot
And it will guide you to the completion of your work (research, preparation, composition, coloring/toning, printing, etc.).
Hernan Gajardo
This book is great, step by step guide to drawing your own manga. not copying someone else's style.
Amdrew Watts

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 51 people found the following review helpful By J. R. Tatarek on October 11, 2006
Far too many aspiring artists who want to be the next big thing in comics or manga concentrate on the art; on how to draw their characters. What they often negelct is everything else that surrounds their characters: the backgrounds and environments, the plot and diologue, the underlying reason for their project in the first place.

Bruce Lewis' "Draw Manga" covers all of these things and more. People looking for one of those paint-by-numbers-hey-look-I-can-draw-a-hot-chick books will be sorely disappointed with this one, solely because it challenges the reader to think about everything concerned with what they're trying to accompish.

What the author is trying to convey here is that a successful (both to oneself as well as one's potential audience) manga is so much more than just nice pictures, and puts those critical elements first and foremost before the first character is ever drawn.

This is a book that should be on every new and experienced manga artist's reference bookshelf, right next to Scott McCloud's "Understanding Comics".
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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Brian Gill on June 21, 2007
What this book is not: a trace-this how-2 for drawing Princess VaVoom of Planet Whoopee.

Lewis' "Draw Manga" promises to show the reader "how to draw figures, create believable characters and develop stories." And the book delivers.

Back to Princess VaVoom for a moment: addressing the interests of hormone-addled male teenagers, the author does devote four paragraphs on page 57 to cheesecake.

Not everyone will find the brief history of ukiyo-e and Hokusai-san's best seller, "Hokusai Manga" as interesting as I did: but I found it useful in setting up a sort of mental cargo pallet to hold the book's other thoughts.

That pallet got pretty full after reading this book. Lewis covers obvious topics, like drawing eyes and hands, discusses workspace design, the importance of research (and how to avoid it), props real and imaginary, how to shamelessly swipe plots and characters, and how to create your own unique style of art, characters, and plots.

The edition of the book I bought had a howler in it. On page 101, four balloons march across the top of the page, illustrating two good, and two not-so-good choices for digital lettering. Problem is, all four balloons contain the same sans-serif font.

However, in the same section Lewis gives a pretty good introduction to leading, size, kerning, and other aspects of making lettering legible.

That's the only glitch I can recall finding in this book's 120-odd pages, which is pretty good for something as content-rich as this.

Someone could learn to create a manga with engaging characters and good plots without reading this book, but that person would be missing a fine resource.
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Imelda Cota-velazquez on November 30, 2006
well.. first i'd like to say that this book ... is f******* awesome.. really . you would have to have one of you own to really understand how helpful this book really is... im not an expert in manga but i've learn tons of things thanx to this book. And if you're wondering if this book has like thos "step-by-step" instruccion on how to draw characters their way instead of yours... well that's what make it so awesome. it gives you examples of the estructures of the characters so you can create your own style. I've read some other books about this subject but so far this has been the best one.. im really glad i bought it. And its even cheaper than those other books that only tells you how to draw certain things in each volume.. definetly a GREAT BOOK
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25 of 31 people found the following review helpful By J. Fu on November 10, 2008
Verified Purchase
I've been drawing manga-style comics for about six years (which is admittedly probably less than Mr. Lewis) and have been published in Rising Stars of Manga, and after reading all of the positive reviews for this item, I bought this book for potential text material for a mini-class I'm teaching this month. Now that I've read through it, I think I'll just give it away to any student who wants it. The art in this book is amateurish at best, and while I can forgive bad art if the instructional material is worthwhile, it simply isn't the case here. Shaky lineart and an unoriginal, derivative "manga" style do more to promote sloppiness and inaccuracies in budding young artists. The book claims to encourage "drawing in a unique style" as opposed to other works that might encourage carbon-copying, and it lives up to the claim solely because it is so vague that it gives no instructions at all. An example I might give is the talk of inking and toning-- Lewis explains how to use these implements technically but gives no advice on how to do so artistically or with any degree of thought or skill, and frankly, a lack of actual technique is one of the major problems with Western manga talent. The most standard instructional will at least talk about line weight or tone textural effects.

It could be because I've read countless other similar books to compare to, but I feel that not only does this volume fail to present anything original in the field of manga instruction, it does a much more cursory and unprofessional job. The inside cover rags on the Graphic-sha How to Draw Manga book series for being a little too culturally impermeable, but at least even that series, rife with its own flaws, teaches something.
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