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Dream Brother: The Lives and Music of Jeff and Tim Buckley Paperback


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Dream Brother: The Lives and Music of Jeff and Tim Buckley + A Pure Drop: The Life of Jeff Buckley + Jeff Buckley - Live in Chicago
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: It Books; Reprint edition (January 8, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 038080624X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380806249
  • Product Dimensions: 2.1 x 3.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #267,877 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A rich and moving portrait of two damaged, gifted people." -- --Esquire

"A vibrantly detailed portrait...as poetic and probing as its subjects." -- --People

"An engaging chronicle...will rivet even cursory music fans. Highly recommended." -- --Library Journal

"Essential and engrossing...a remarkable job." -- --The Onion

"Expertly reported...engrossing detail...captures how two lives intersected and ended in the same tragic place." -- --Rolling Stone

"Gripping...an incisive portrait of the ill-fated father and son." -- --Karen Burns, B&n.com

"Haunting, plaintive...a provocative picture of father and son." -- --E! Online

"The first book to draw a clear picture of these soulful cult icons." -- --Hear/Say magazine

"[A] meticulously researched dual biography." -- --Chicago Tribune

"[An] ambitious dual biography...uses a wealth of reportage to depict convincingly two generations of pop music turmoil." -- --The Washington Post --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

David Browne is the music critic for Entertainment Weekly and a former reporter for the New York Daily News. His articles on music and popular culture have appeared in Rolling Stone, the New York Times, Mojo, and other publications. A graduate of New York University's journalism program, be is the recipient of a 1996 Music Journalism Award for criticism. He lives in New York City.


More About the Author

David Browne is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone, and his work has appeared in the New York Times, Time, Spin, the New Republic, Men's Journal, the Huffington Post, and numerous other outlets. For many years he was the music critic at the New York Daily News and then Entertainment Weekly, where, among other tasks, he worked as a roadie for Kiss, shared a bagel with Leonard Cohen in Cohen's Montreal home, and spent time on the tour buses with Coldplay and the Black Crowes.

Browne is the author of four books: "Dream Brother" (2001), a dual biography of the late musicians Jeff and Tim Buckley; "Amped" (2004), a history of extreme sports; and "Goodbye 20th Century" (2008), a biography of the pioneering indie band Sonic Youth. "Dream Brother" has been translated into French and Italian and has been optioned as source material for a major feature film on the life of Jeff Buckley, for which Browne will be a consultant. "Goodbye 20th Century" was hailed as "an expressway to the soul of of the influential band" by Vanity Fair, "a rollicking, epic biography" by Salon, and "compulsively readable" by Publishers Weekly. It has also been published in the UK and Germany, with a Japanese edition forthcoming.

He is the recipient of a Music Journalism Award for criticism. Born and raised in New Jersey, not far from Bruce Springsteen territory, he lives and works in New York City. He has a jones for sci-fi and horror films, non-fiction books, and those chocolate/coconut Girl Scout cookies, in no particular order.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Anyone who considers her/himself a fan would be interested in reading this book.
Lydia F. Bosley
If Dream Brother has taught me anything separate from the lives of Jeff and Tim Buckley, it's that David Browne is a sneakier, better writer than he appears to be.
E. Kutinsky
An amazing book that gives you incredible insight and appreciation for these two talented musicians!
Marisa Phillips

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 9, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I have been a Tim Buckley fan for over 30 years, and never knew much about him. After 300+ pages, I knew the facts, the families, the flaws and failings of this incredible artist whose work has been overlooked for so long. And I learned the sad consequences of his frailities on the life of his son Jeff, another unique talent. Their story, when it's all said and done, is the same sad saga that has been played out in so many families since time began. What made Tim Buckley so incredible, and important enough to warrant a book about him, was the music. If you want to know about Tim Buckley or Jeff Buckely, read Dream Brother. If you want to know them, listen to their music.
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37 of 40 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 19, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I have to admit I was wary of this book at first. Having known Jeff Buckley a bit from 'round the neighborhood during that magic Sin-e summer of '93, I knew that a dual-bio with his father Tim would have been among his worst nightmares. But Browne has artfully woven their stories together with an admirable degree of distance and sympathy. Though Browne is very even-handed in his treatment of the elder Buckley, Tim's actions speak for themselves: often a fearless and innovative musician, he was also horribly self-centered, indulgent, and selfish. Jeff comes off as the sweet one, which (mostly) he was. His loss was immense and breaks my heart to this day, and I'm glad that Browne has avoided the bottom-feeder approach of his contemporaries (like Victor Bockris) and written a book that is caring, accurate, and moving. If you like either or both Buckleys, this is a bracing read that will enrich the experience of listening to their music.
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55 of 63 people found the following review helpful By "nycybergal" on February 5, 2001
Format: Hardcover
After reading David Browne's book, I was left with the impression that all these people who surrounded Jeff Buckley had no idea who he was or how sick he was. He needed help, serious help and everyone -- from people who were friends with him to the record company and management, had no clue how to deal with this person who had a lot of pain and never really dealt with it. The book doesn't mention whether Jeff actually had some therapy done, if anyone pushed for Jeff to get some help, and the book doesn't seem to go into much depth as to who this Jeff Buckley was. There are no indepth readings of his journal, just bits and pieces, fragments.
It's mentioned he reflected everything and everyone around him -- which would happen when one has a loss of self. The book is amiss of what happened to him in Los Angeles -- it's sketchier than Tim Buckley's bio part, which is a surprise, knowing that Jeff's history is more recent than Tim's. I was left with the impression that Jeff was having a nervous breakdown, a serious one, and that no one was equipped or aware enough or cared enough to commit Jeff or do what needed to be done to help him and have him confront his inner demons.
It is said Jeff joked about tortured souls yet the one light this book shed showed that Jeff seemed to follow his father's steps in every chapter. And that his tortured good looks brought about his downfall -- everyone seemed so charmed by him in the book that no one helped him. His physical appearance during the final months screamed help yet no one seemed to be really listening -- not even his lovers, apparently. All we see are people being or getting uncomfortable with him and walking away towards the end, like they could smell death coming and they were too alive to get sucked in.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By NeverWillCome on December 12, 2004
Format: Paperback
Having been intrigued by the music and aura of the late Jeff Buckley, I had contemplated purchasing and reading 'Dream Brother' for close to a year. My trepidation and reservations were mostly surrounding the notion that it would perhaps change my enigmatic vision of Jeff and his brief, but amazing, body of work. Regardless, I wanted to know him more, and I wanted to understand him. So, I finally decided to give it a shot...

Not very familiar with Tim's music or his life, I found his half of the story to be somewhat overly critical and less than forgiving at times. The description and overview of his body of work, methods of recording, and approach to his craft was given a good amount of attention, detail, and objection. However, the story of his life outside of the studio sometimes came off as overly subjective and sometimes leaning towards the prejudged. I felt that he may not have been given the same treatment in being covered as Jeff had been, which in all fairness, may very well be justified given the lack of contacts and accurate resources when compared to the younger Buckley. Whatever the intentions or purposes behind his actions, Tim Buckley's life is strikingly paralleled to his son's, and that alone made for a very intriguing read. I enjoyed the simplicity of the story's structure and the layout that Browne used. It is, by no means, a difficult or overly captivating read. It simply lets the story speak mostly for itself, which was neccesary, in my opinion, to keep you focused on the two subjects rather than any opinions that the author may be swaying to.

If I did have to make one complaint, though, it would have to be that at several points in the book, I simply wanted to know more. That is of no fault to Browne, assuming no facts were consciously omitted.
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