Buy New
$21.90
Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.95
  • Save: $8.05 (27%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Dream Plants for the Natural Garden Paperback – December 1, 2013


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$21.90
$18.23 $16.29
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Frequently Bought Together

Dream Plants for the Natural Garden + Planting: A New Perspective + Landscapes in Landscapes
Price for all three: $91.49

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Frances Lincoln; PB Reissue edition (December 1, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0711234620
  • ISBN-13: 978-0711234628
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 9.2 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #94,455 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Gerritsen and Oudolf loosely define a "natural garden" as one that contains plants that need minimal maintenance, attract wildlife, and have a "natural appearance." More than 1000 such plants are covered in this encyclopedic guide. Because the authors are garden designers practicing in Northern Europe, the plants featured are mostly suitable to cold-winter, temperate climates with summer rainfall. For other regions, many of the plants covered are unsuitable horticulturally (requiring lots of care) and environmentally (extremely invasive and ecologically destructive). Moreover, the authors support the cautious use of invasive plants, so long as gardeners are vigilantly prepared to control their growth. This advice is clearly unsound, especially considering that plants with invasive characteristics can be serious threats to local habitats. For readers interested in natural gardening, a much more regionally and environmentally appropriate resource is Natural Gardening, edited by John Kadel Boring (Time-Life, 1999). This book is not recommended. Brian Lym, City Coll. of San Francisco Lib.
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Inquisitive gardeners will savor the engagingly wry tone and provocative opinions contained in this fine compendium. Based upon the long-bandied-about idea of low-maintenance gardening, Gerritsen and Oudolf bring their own distinctive, aesthetic approach to the concept of choosing undemanding plants that also stand as beautiful garden specimens. Inspiring plantsmen, they remind gardeners that perfection is unattainable, so rather than "tarmac your garden," the wise soul learns to work with nature. Tough, playful, and troublesome are attributes that define this richly illustrated book's broad categories of hardy perennials, exuberant self-seeding species, and capricious types that might still be worthy of one's efforts. Taken together, a range of recommended plants holds the promise of bringing an exhilarating naturalism to a garden scheme. Alice Joyce
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 8 customer reviews
The pictures are beautiful and in color.
James Guilford
Oudolf has been renowned for his masterful use of perennials as players in gardens of four-season interest.
Julie Siegel
I hope this book will help prepare me for my own garden.
kokka

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Julie Siegel on November 12, 2000
Format: Hardcover
In concert with Piet Oudolf's previous two books on ornamental grasses and on design, Dream Plants for the Natural Garden expands the vision of an already exceptional garden personality. As a dutch designer and nurseryman, Oudolf offers us his emperical advice about hardy plant selection from an earthbound perspective. Paired here with his fellow garden designer, Henk Gerritsen, Oudolf makes a bold case for the natural style advocated by an international group of landscapers. Instead of conventional groupings by color, Oudolf and Gerritsen communicate both their aesthetic and practical choices here under the headings of "Tough," "Playful," and "Troublesome." They espouse plants that grow easily without pesticides & fertilizers while providing year-round beauty. Oudolf has been renowned for his masterful use of perennials as players in gardens of four-season interest. This volume describes 1200 plants he and Gerritsen have chosen on the basis of behavior, strengths and usage. The combined results of their long experience, provide us with details hard to find in one place before now. Many of these plants are cutting edge (especially in the US) and thus, not widely written about in popular horticultural literature. As everywhere, the Netherlands have their own climatic conditions; thus, gardeners from other countries will need to extrapolate a bit. Luckily, the authors provide enough information on zone, soil and sun conditions to make this possible. The photographs maintain the high-quality of previous Oudolf books. However, since plant descriptions outnumber pictures, it helps to have some familiarity with the specific genera and species mentioned. The clean presentation of format, text and illustration make this eminently readable. As a landscape professional, I cannot more enthusiastically recommend such a distinct and useful publication.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By GP Fan on October 20, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This volume, taken together with Oudolf's "Designing With Plants" -- an invaluable companion -- gives the gardener an inspiring and comprehensive approach to stylish landscape design and plant selection. Taken by itself, "Dream Plants" is a not necessarily helpful guide. It's hard to make sense of it as different from any other plant selection book, as it has no context. But in consort with "Designing With Plants," the design context comes clear: one has both the key and the lock in one place -- the design guide, and the plant selection menu. With both in hand -- and the photographs are lush and suggestive, and the plans bold and clearly illuminated -- there remains plenty of obscurity throughout. But there are not many mistakes here of continuity, and so one has confidence that it is as full and reliable a depiction of natural, early 21st century garden and landscape design principles and practice one can get between two covers.
Contrast this with the dreary corporate planting schemes of van Sweeden and Oehme -- not an inspiration anywhere in their so-called "Bold Romantic Gardens". With Oudolf, the reader discovers as much about the the secrets of his design pallet as can be revealed without actually having him standing over your shoulder. This book is full of mystery, which is as it should be, with detailed clues and hints in the variety of plants discussed in detail, the photographs of combinations that demonstrate his views on plant structure, appearance and sequencing, and the useful back-and-forth between the principles of garden design he favors, and the selection of plants he uses to bring it to life.
I would not purchase "Dream Plants" without also purchasing "Designing With Plants." Together, they are a fabulous combination.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
54 of 60 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 11, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Dutchmen Gerritsen and Oudolf label Boltonia a "troublesome, demanding plant." The same with our common wildflower Monkshood. They say that Knipofia won't survive winter. Lobelia hybrids are "only for people with green fingers." "Tierella wherryi is quite reliable when you look after it properly..." All of these plants are favorites in US gardens.
And the crowning insult to American readers -- Echniacea (Purple Coneflower) is labeled "troublesome." This is one of the most popular perennials in the US!
While I appreciate the design ideas of Oudolf's earlier books, this one is a bust as far as plant advice for US readers goes -- and the plant descriptions take up most of the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By The Garden Interior on July 10, 2014
Format: Paperback
The great global catastrophe that was World War I changed the world forever of course – empires, nations, monarchies and governments were swept away and nine million people were killed. And many important cultural artifacts were swept away forever as well, including the old-style, labor-intensive gardening of the 19th Century and the Victoria and Edwardian eras. Cheap labor was no longer to be had in the great homes of England and in their gardens, and so a new style of gardening necessarily took its place. It was more modest, less labor-dependent, more self-sustaining and natural. It actually had its beginnings in the latter part of the 19th Century, in the “tapestry tradition” of color blending that was the gardening style innovated by the Arts & Crafts movement.

A century later, this design trend has taken another pronounced turn, this time also fed by the cost of labor, a desire for smaller gardens, pressure on water supplies and a preference for gardening that is more sustainable and natural in appearance. At the center of this design revolution is Piet Oudolf and his longtime friend and collaborator Henk Gerritsen. Their “Dutch Wave” of “natural gardening” – or the “New Perennial” movement as it is sometimes also called – has transformed modern thinking about garden design, particularly in large and public spaces. The hallmarks of natural gardening are less reliance on flowers and more use of sculptural elements such as grasses and small shrubs, less structured planting areas, a greater use of xeric and native plants, as well as plants that are hardier and less fussy. It gives greater prominence to the whole plant and all its structures in all seasons, than to its floral expression at one brief moment of blooming glory.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?