Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Dreamhunter (The Dreamhunter Duet, Book 1) Hardcover – Bargain Price, February 21, 2006


See all 18 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Bargain Price, February 21, 2006
$17.83 $1.94

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details

100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime


Special Offers and Product Promotions


Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 - 17 years
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR); 1st edition (February 21, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374318530
  • ASIN: B000MKYL0S
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.2 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,818,614 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 5-9–Laura Hame and her cousin Rose, 14, live in a recognizable early-20th-century society, realistically portrayed but for one thing: the Place, discovered about 20 years earlier by Lauras father. It lies outside geographical boundaries, and only select people are able to enter and experience dreams there. These dreamhunters then perform their received dreams for large theater audiences, and those in attendance go to sleep and experience them. At the time of this story, dreams have become big business and are embroiled in issues of social control (especially the control of prisoners) and power politics. When Lauras father disappears, the girl takes enormous risks first to try to find him, and then to complete his mission. While the author leaves tantalizing clues throughout the novel, the plot moves slowly at first. However, patient readers will find themselves rewarded by the riveting action in the final third of the book. Relationships between the characters, especially Laura and Rose, are given center stage, but their interaction flags in the middle of the book. Particularly touching is the relationship between Laura and a golem-type creature sculpted out of sand in the magical world of the Place. Dry, unchanging, with nothing either fully living or dead, no wind or sounds, it is eerily suffused with atmosphere and powerfully portrayed. This novel, the first of a duet of books, concludes neither with a cliffhanger nor at the end, but in the middle of the action. It will appeal to lovers of fantasy set in the real world, who will eagerly await the resolution in the second volume.–Sue Giffard, Ethical Culture Fieldston School, New York City
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Gr. 10-12. Readers pining for a fantasist to rival Philip Pullman or Garth Nix may have finally found what they seek in New Zealander Knox, the author of numerous novels for adults. Knox sets her first YA novel in a fictional nation called Southland, where turn-of-the-century society is coming to terms with a geographical marvel called "the Place," a harvesting ground for dreams that can be caught and sold to sleeping customers. Fifteen-year-old cousins Rose and Laura belong to a first family of dream hunting: Laura's father discovered the Place 20 years before, and Rose's celebrity mother is a sought-after dream-palace performer. When a test reveals that only reluctant Laura, not pert, confident Rose, has inherited the gift, Laura must contend not only with her shaken relationship with her cousin but also with the disappearance of her father, who has left behind puzzling messages about the true nature of dreams. Although Laura's transformation from wilting violet to intrepid avenger seems too abrupt, Knox's wide-angle narrative convincingly explores the nuances of the charismatic extended family and the personal and political implications of the dream-hunting phenomenon. Questions are not so much answered as deepened in anticipation of book 2 in the highly promising Dreamhunter Duet. Jennifer Mattson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Can't wait for the second book.
Rhonda Bennett
Like so many great fantasy novels, Dreamhunter is set in a world not that different from our own.
Miss Print
Fortunately, both are definitely the case with this book.
Lindsey Miller

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Teen Reads on May 31, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Laura Hame and Rose Tiebold's 15th birthdays are approaching. While many people their age would be excited about parties and presents, this birthday is different for the two cousins. They are eligible to test themselves at the Place and see if they're qualified to be Dreamhunters. The Place is a vast, extraordinary land where dreams of every kind are only accessible to Dreamhunters. A Dreamhunter is a person who can cross over and catch impressive dreams that can be relayed to other people.

Dreamhunting runs in the cousins' families. Laura's father Tziga and Rose's mother Grace are famous Dreamhunters whose collections of dreams bring large audiences far and wide to experience them at the Rainbow Opera, a famous dream palace. Despite the fame and wealth, dreamhunting is not always a glamorous occupation, and oftentimes a dreamhunter is on a different schedule from that of their own family. On many occasions, Grace's husband Chorley is the primary caretaker of the Hame-Tiebold household.

When it is the girls' turn to try, they each have different expectations. Laura feels anxious while Rose hopes to be a famous dreamhunter like her mother. When the day arrives, both are surprised at the results. Rose doesn't cross to the Place, but Laura does. However, for Laura the occasion is bittersweet; instead of having a pleasant dream called the Wild River, she has a nightmare, and her father has mysteriously disappeared after going on an official job for the government.

The family is baffled by the Dream Regulatory Body's explanation and doesn't understand why Tziga would decide to enter the Place without telling his family. Meanwhile, strange events have been occurring that defy explanation.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Team LitPick on March 21, 2006
Format: Hardcover
The Place, a land that seems utterly different from the real world, but it is so close. Laura and her cousin, Rose, are both fifteen. At fifteen they are qualified to go into the Place but they must past the test first, the Try. But before they could enter, they discover a dark secret hidden in the Place. As Laura and Rose try to figure out the secret, Laura's father disappears. Now Laura and Rose have to find Laura's father and the secret before time runs out...

I thought this book was fairly good. I loved the plot and how the setting connected with the story line. All the characters had their distinct features and personalities about themselves. However, I wish the story was told in someone's point of veiw, not third person. It was a little difficult to get a sense of their emotions. Overall, Elizabeth Knox kept the story in line and did not go off track. It was a good book!

Reviewed by Flamingnet Book Reviews.

[...]

Preteen, teen, and young adult book reviews and recommendations.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dances with lemurs on May 10, 2006
Format: Hardcover
"Dreamhunter", wow it sounds so mysterious. Elizabeth Knox has really outdone herself. She wrote a 365 page book (hardcover), and made it sound like a fairytale written in perfect english.

Laura Hame's father, Tziga Hame, is a famous dreamhunter. He takes dreams from a magical place called the "Place" and performs them to people to either entertain them, or heal them. There are very few dreamhunters, each with their own special talents. However, not all is as it seems. Laura must learn the truth about her father when he disappears, and what she learns could change the course of the future.

Through magic, fiction, and politics, Elizabeth Knox writes an elegant fantasy that keeps READERS ENTERTAINED! READ IT!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By F. J. Barrowman on May 31, 2005
Format: Hardcover
The Rainbow Opera is young adults at it's finest. The fantastic prose rolls over your eyes and the story is astounding, it is literature. Elizabeth Knox has been writing since she was sixteen, and this is her first young adult's novel - but do not turn away from this book in Genre-disgust! It can be read by adults, and those who have have enjoyed it fully. It tells the story of two fifteen year-old cousins, Laura and Rose. These girls are nearing the age in their country when they can have...(meaningless suspense)... A Try.

That is what you should do, give this book a try, you will enjoy it. Even if you are The Dark Master Of Scorn.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Joyce Ketterer on May 20, 2007
Format: Hardcover
As an adult with a penchant for YA fiction I am accustomed to a certain tone from these books. Upon reading "Dreamhunter" I found myself having nightmares for a few nights - not surprising given the subject matter. I wondered why one would tell such a story to children. Let me be clear that these books are a work of distopian fiction, a cautionary tale about the destruction of a society through the greed and selfishness of it's rulers. Though not gorey and certainly not horror particularly more savvy readers will definitely find this a disturbing read (it is all done in an extremely subtle way and the most disturbing aspects might be over the heads of many young readers). However, this first book especially is upsetting. As I came to the conclusion of the second volume I understood - these works are decidedly activist in the same tradition as Pullman's "His Dark Materials". Unlike Pullman, Knox is not so much trying to convey a certain theological and philosophical perspective as she has written a rallying cry for word change. Taken in the context of our current world climate - the erosion of civil liberties and the middle class in the United States - it is easy to see that this series is talking about the present day. She could certainly have marketed them as adult books with no changes, but the choice to present "The Dreamhunter Duet" to children first shows remarkable intent. Definitely "His Dark Materials good", strongly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?