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Dreams of the Golden Age Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; Reprint edition (January 7, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 076533481X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765334817
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #110,918 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Sixteen-year-old Anna and her friends sneak out at night to meet up in the park and regularly catch the attention of the police in Commerce City, but they’re not up to no good. They’re practicing their superpowers and training to become a new team of vigilante superheroes. Meanwhile, Anna’s mother, Celia, is trying to rescue the city through more conventional means—namely, her wildly successful development company, currently bidding the city to start a major revitalization project. But when a shell company frivolously sues West Corp to derail their bid, Celia manages to slyly recruit her teenage daughter to investigate the organization with her team, and they discover a new archvillain, the Executive. In this follow-up to After the Golden Age (2011), Vaughan adds a liberal dose of family drama to tried-and-true superhero tropes. Celia’s struggle to balance her life as a mother and a powerful executive is so at the fore that the superhero elements often seem merely incidental, but readers looking for an unusual spin on a mother-daughter dynamic will find a lot to like. --Sarah Hunter

Review

Praise for After the Golden Age

“More than a superhero story, this is a tale of finding your true self and realizing that good and evil often come in various shades.”
RT Book Reviews, 4 ½ stars, a Top Pick!
“Vaughn has written such simple and elegant prose to tell a story of superheroes who are just like regular folk….I enjoyed every minute of being glued to it.”
Sacramento Book Review

“A strong outing...well worth the quick, intense read.”
Library Journal

“A thrilling yarn.... Good old-fashioned comic book fun.”
Locus

“[A] warm homage to and deconstruction of classic comic books.... For readers who admire Lois Lane more than Superman.”
Kirkus Reviews

More About the Author

I was born in California, but grew up all over the country, a bona fide Air Force Brat. I currently live in Colorado, with my miniature American Eskimo dog, Lily. I have a Masters in English Lit, love to travel, love movies, plays, music, just about anything, and am known to occasionally pick up a rapier.

I've never been a DJ, but I love writing about one.

Here's my website: www.carrievaughn.com

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By B. Capossere TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 21, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Dreams of the Golden Age is the follow up to Carrie Vaughn’s After the Golden Age, to which I have only a middling review thanks to issues of plotting and characterization. While the sequel suffers from some of the same problems, they crop up less frequently and are less problematic. The main character, meanwhile, is a more active and engaging voice and so I found Dreams of the Golden Age to be more successful and thus far more enjoyable.

The sequel picks up a good number of years after its predecessor. At the end of After the Golden Age, Celia had married Dr. Mentis and taken over as head of West Corps. She is now the mother of two teen daughters, one of whom—Anna—will split POVs with Celia for the novel. Unlike her mother, Anna has inherited the family superpower genes, but much to her dismay she has what she considers a near-useless ability—she can locate anyone she concentrates on. Meanwhile, several of her friends (thanks to Celia’s behind-the-scenes manipulation, those likely to have inherited a superpower are clustered together in an elite private school) have come into their own powers and the teens have decided to follow in the footsteps of the now retired Olympiad team of crime-fighting superheroes.

The premise is a wholly engaging one as rather than focus on heroes already in their crime-fighting prime, we see the fits and starts of the beginning of the process as these kids try and figure out the best ways to use their powers, both individually and as a team. And being teenagers, there is a lot of jealousy, sniping, one-upmanship, hurt feelings etc. Anna, for instance, feels next to useless compared to her friends who can shoot laser bolts or control frost a la the X-Men’s Iceman.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mama Mia on January 27, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I picked up this series because I enjoyed her Kitty books. The Kitty books are fun, but in my opinion, these blow Kitty out of the water. I gave the first Golden Age book 5 stars, and I would give this one 5+ if it was possible.

The author tells the story from the points of view of both the mother and the daughter, and develops both characters so fully and honestly that you aches for them and their struggles. I love the originality of the book as a drama about family and relationshiops and coping with challenges, along with fun sci-fi action, peppered with classic superhero story elements. The writing is mature and the story is both deep and enterntaining at the same time.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. Weaver on January 13, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Carrie, I am glad you wrote it your way. It is a perfect sequel to the original book.

Carrie remains one of my favorite authors and I recommend her to my high school students. What if your parents had superpowers and you didn't is how I sum up the Golden Age.

This one: what if your grandparents had superpowers? And your friends?
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By Henry L. Lazarus on February 20, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Carrie Vaughn is one of the writers I look for new works on Amazon when I run low on reading. Her latest continues the attempt at super-hero realism that she started with After the Golden Age (paper) in which Celia, the daughter of two of Commerce City’s superheroes, had to use her smarts to survive being constantly kidnapped. Decades later there are Dreams of the golden Age (hard from Tor) as Celia’s daughter and friends develop super powers and want to become super protectors like their grandparents. All the super powered people had parents and grandparents who were present when a crazy experiment went awry and Celia has maneuvered the kids with scholarships into the same private school. So we have the complications of adult/teenage interactions; wannabe heroes learning their trade; and Celia’s illness. There’s also, at the end a super villain to bring everyone together. I don’t think the attempt at mixing real problems with super powers work well together, but I enjoyed the attempt. Review Printed in the Philadelphia Weekly Press
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By Kenton P. Miller on February 19, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Carrie Vaughn was reportedly under a lot of pressure after the success of "After the Golden Age", to just churn out another in the series, as she seems to almost effortlessly to do with her 'Kitty" series. The pressure would be even more immense, given that that series goes from strength to strength with each book in the series.
Thankfully, she held off and followed her sense of what would make a more interesting story - to revisit Celia West, the non-super-powered daughter of iconic superheroes of Commerce City, many years later. She herself is now a mother, married to a former hero and managing the family business; worried, of course, that her two daughters may well have inherited their family traits.
Vaughn's brilliance is that she avoids all likely cliches - the daughter whose life we mainly follow, Anna, at the hands of a lesser author may have been portrayed as a super brat. This author creates such credible thought processes, such a believable trail of angst for mother and daughter, that you are drawn in to their worlds. Be warned that the last third of this book is impossible to put down - don't be caught as I was, too late in the evening being drawn in to the adventures and excitement.
It's more than a worthy sequel; like the heroes of Commerce City, Carrie Vaughn's writing has enormous power and maturity.
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