Buy Used
$3.80
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Dreams in the Golden Country: The Diary of Zipporah Feldman, a Jewish Immigrant Girl, New York City, 1903 (Dear America) Hardcover – March 1, 1998


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$0.28 $0.01

"The Island of Dr. Libris" by Chris Grabenstein
What if your favorite characters came to life? Celebrate the power of imagination with this adventure where the real story starts after you close the book! See more
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

"Evil Spy School" by Stuart Gibbs
When Ben gets kicked out of the CIA’s spy school, he enrolls with the enemy. This companion to "Spy School" and "Spy Camp" is rife with adventure and espionage. See more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 - 12 years
  • Lexile Measure: 750L (What's this?)
  • Series: Dear America
  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Inc. (March 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0590029738
  • ISBN-13: 978-0590029735
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5.6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #405,611 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 4-8--Zipporah Feldman, a 12-year-old Jewish immigrant from Russia, uses diary entries to chronicle her family's activities as they acclimate to life on New York City's Lower East Side. The hopes and dreams of a young girl are beautifully portrayed through Lasky's eloquent and engaging narrative. Readers are quickly drawn into Zipporah's world of traditional Jewish ritual and celebrations and will identify with the girl's desires to aspire to greatness in her new home. She absorbs the freedom of America, wanting to share her enthusiasm with her parents, encouraging her father to pursue his love of music and trying to persuade her mother to shed some of her strict religious ways. The story's historical significance is evident in the Feldman's arrival at Ellis Island and the subsequent procedures immigrants had to endure, and in the description of the factory fire in which Zipporah's friend dies, which is based on the famous Triangle Shirtwaist Factory of 1911. Characters are portrayed as strong individuals, and their motives are believable. Readers learn in an epilogue that Zipporah pursued her love for the theater and eventually rose to stardom. Archival photos, accompanied by a recipe for hamantaschen and the traditional Jewish song to welcome the Sabbath, bring the reality of the novel to light. A story of hope and of love for one's country.

Janet Gillen, Great Neck Public Library, NY

Copyright 1998 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

My opinion about this book is that the author made a real situation interesting.
Molly
The story focuses on the Feldman family, life for immigrant Jews in 1903, and Jewish practices are also very often spoken about.
Joanna
Kathryn Lasky did a wonderful job maintaining the reader's interest throughout the story.
Angelica Cristi

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 14, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Dreams in the Golden Country was another great Dear America book. It is the diary of Zipporah Feldman, a Jewish immigrant girl from Russia, in which she describes her family's first year and a half living on New York City's Lower East Side. Zipporah, or Zippy as she is called, dreams of being an actress in New York's Yiddish theater, and is overjoyed when she is given a job as a prop gir. But her newfound joy is overshadowed by the death of her baby brother when he is just a few days old. To make matters worse for her mother, Zippy's older sister, Miriam, recently ran off to marry a non-Jewish Irish boy, and her sister, Tovah, believes in women's rights and has organized a union, both of which Mrs. Feldman dissaproves of. Plus, one of Zippy's friends dies in a factory fire. Can Zippy really make a new life for herself in this so-called "golden country" that isn't so golden after all?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 15, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Zipporah is another excellent Dear America book. Zippy, 12 years old, has just arrived at Ellis Island from Russia, where the pogroms (attacks on the Jews) chased them away. Traveling with her mother, her sisters, Miriam (15), and Tovah (17) her family goes to meet her Father who has been in America for 2 years. There they find a small tenement room. Everyone is disapointed. Zippy's mother is worried about her father loosing his Jewish faith. Zippy gets put in an early grade because she isn't very talented in English, but she moves up. Zippy learns about things and writes letters to the famous Marie Curie and Wright Brothers (never gets a reply back). Then she sees the theater and knows acting will forever control her destiny. Filled with hardships and triumphs, Zippy's diary is one of the best. It really isn't very exciting with a lot of stuff happening, but the emotional factor is so great and really makes me think. I was also happy that Zippy had the same birthday as me.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Angelica Cristi on October 17, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Dreams in the Golden Country
Summary
On the first day of September, a Jewish girl the age of 12 sits atop her wooden suitcase on Ellis Island. With her family surrounding her, they await a dreary inspection that is rumored to be painful. This was quite a nerve-wracking inspection, for it would determine if they were to be allowed in America or not. You see, Zipporah Feldman and her Jewish family traveled from a little village in Russia to immigrate to America - "the golden country". However, they were not the only people that had to complete the inspection acceptably. Jews from many residences in Russia were in line to await the dreadful tasks they had to pass for the sake of their lives. In Russia, Jews lived precariously. Many of them found it difficult to find jobs - until word began to circulate that Jews were welcome in America.
Zipporah brings along a diary that her mother gave her before they left Russia. In it, she writes her innermost feelings about her big dreams in "the golden country" and what she experiences along the way. On a certain entry, she writes gleefully that they all pass the inspection of Ellis Island and are on their way to meeting "Papa" in America. To their shock, they find that America was very different than what they expected it to be. As Zipporah's father leads them through a crowded alley, they finally reach their destination - a rickety, ramshackle apartment that has to be shared with the whole family, and an elderly man. In the beginning, the four girls (Zipporah, her mother, and two older sisters) are feeling regret and homesickness. However, more and more the days pass, they get somewhat used to the place.
Zipporah starts school but went back a few grades because she only knew Russian.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Allyn on July 19, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Twelve-year-old Zipporah Feldman's life changes drastically the moment she steps away from Ellis Island in 1903. Raised in Russia, her family has immigrated to America to avoid the persecution they and other Jews in Russia face. But hardships, trials, and changes do not end for the Feldmans once they arrive in the New World. Their adaptations to their new lives and their insistence on holding on to their Jewish ways are vibrantly recorded by Zipporah.
This is truly one of the best "Dear America" books, along with Susan Campbell Bartoletti's "A Coal Miner's Bride." Lasky has created an excellent main character; for Zipporah is spunky, courageous, smart, and funny. Zipporah's writings capture the immigration experience for readers, yet her troubles and thoughts are in many ways timeless. Fascinating bits of Jewish culture and history are woven timelessly into the diary, and Zipporah's experience with Yiddish theater is truly enthralling and inspiring. There is never a dull moment in this diary (unlike some others in the series) and the ending and epilogue are both superb. Creatively written, this is definitely a "Dear America" for your collection.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 4, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I am Jewish and I found this book really interesting because my great grandmother was an immigrant girl, just like Zippy. My mom had to help me with the Yiddish words that I didn't understand. I found it cool to think that my great grandma was one of them! I would recommend this book to you because it has many interesting facts about Jewish immigrants. a good way to read this book it to picture yourself in Zippy's place, think about how hard it would be to be one of them, think about what you would do then, how you could change Zippy's future. SO READ THIS BOOK!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Hi Readers! Thanks for coming by my author page. I've written all sorts of books - from fantasy about animals to books about science. One of my favorite animal fantasy series, Guardians of Ga'Hoole, is a major motion picture. I liked writing about Ga'Hoole so much that I decided to revisit that world in a different series, Wolves of the Beyond. I've recently added a new Guardians book: The Rise of A Legend, the story of Ezylryb, the great sage of the Ga'Hoole Tree. Another new book just came out, the first in the Horses of the Dawn series. I think of it as an equine retelling of the Spanish conquest of the New World. Visit my website, www.kathrynlasky.com for the latest news. All my best, Kathryn