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Dress Her in Indigo (Travis Mcgee) Mass Market Paperback – March 9, 1996


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Product Details

  • Series: Travis Mcgee
  • Mass Market Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Fawcett; 1 edition (March 9, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780449224625
  • ISBN-13: 978-0449224625
  • ASIN: 0449224627
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.9 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,242,152 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for John D. MacDonald and the Travis McGee novels
 
The great entertainer of our age, and a mesmerizing storyteller.”—Stephen King
 
“My favorite novelist of all time . . . All I ever wanted was to touch readers as powerfully as John D. MacDonald touched me. No price could be placed on the enormous pleasure that his books have given me. He captured the mood and the spirit of his times more accurately, more hauntingly, than any ‘literature’ writer—yet managed always to tell a thunderingly good, intensely suspenseful tale.”—Dean Koontz
 
“To diggers a thousand years from now, the works of John D. MacDonald would be a treasure on the order of the tomb of Tutankhamen.”—Kurt Vonnegut
 
“A master storyteller, a masterful suspense writer . . . John D. MacDonald is a shining example for all of us in the field. Talk about the best.”—Mary Higgins Clark
 
“A dominant influence on writers crafting the continuing series character . . . I envy the generation of readers just discovering Travis McGee, and count myself among the many readers savoring his adventures again.”—Sue Grafton
 
“One of the great sagas in American fiction.”—Robert B. Parker
 
“Most readers loved MacDonald’s work because he told a rip-roaring yarn. I loved it because he was the first modern writer to nail Florida dead-center, to capture all its languid sleaze, racy sense of promise, and breath-grabbing beauty.”—Carl Hiaasen
 
“The consummate pro, a master storyteller and witty observer . . . John D. MacDonald created a staggering quantity of wonderful books, each rich with characterization, suspense, and an almost intoxicating sense of place. The Travis McGee novels are among the finest works of fiction ever penned by an American author and they retain a remarkable sense of freshness.”—Jonathan Kellerman
 
“What a joy that these timeless and treasured novels are available again.”—Ed McBain
 
“Travis McGee is the last of the great knights-errant: honorable, sensual, skillful, and tough. I can’t think of anyone who has replaced him. I can’t think of anyone who would dare.”—Donald Westlake
 
“There’s only one thing as good as reading a John D. MacDonald novel: reading it again. A writer way ahead of his time, his Travis McGee books are as entertaining, insightful, and suspenseful today as the moment I first read them. He is the all-time master of the American mystery novel.”—John Saul

From the Publisher

7 1.5-hour cassettes --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

Customer Reviews

I am rereading all of John D. MacDonald's Travis McGee books.
S. Davis
I did feel that there may have been too many characters in this book and that the problems of the "girl" the story centers around were never really made clear.
Lowcountry girl
The book is well written the author sets up a scene very well.
David

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 7, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It really doesn't matter which Travis McGee book you are reading because they are all so pleasureable that it is like slipping into a warm bath. They possess great narrative drive and a character that is at once bigger than life, self-deprecating, philosophical and all too human.
Travis Mcgee is a great figure in literature. Over the 20 years or so that MacDonald wrote these 21 novels(all with a color in the title and all with the title somewhere in the novel), McGee aged by about a year for every three that MacDonald wrote. His insights grew sharper, his cynicism and self loathing battled with his heroic life and his incredible pleasures. His reliance on his physical dexterity and strength diminished as his cunning increased.
The books were written between approximately 1964 to 1984. This particular book was written in 1969. Relatively early in the saga, and one of a handful taking place in Mexico. Most took place in South Florida where he lived on a houseboat. Where else could he live?
He went to Mexico to find out what happened to a friend's daughter. Traveling with his frequent companion, Meyer, he uncovers some sinister plot and we are introduced to some great memorable characters, and always fabulous women including Elena from Guadalahara and Becky, a sexual machine. Since it is the late 60's, you get to see the hippies in Mexico and McGee's relation to them.
The wonder and greatness of these books lies in the writing and the creation of a world and a being that you are lucky to tag along with during your time together.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By George Duncan on July 4, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If I recall, John D. MacDonald considered this novel a "failure." But a failure by MacDonald would be a success for most other writers. It's not the best in the McGee series but still has much to recommend it. The prose remains superb, there are quirky and interesting characters, a very, unlikely villain and a few surprising twists and turns. It was written in 1969 and the social upheaval of the times is in the background of the novel, even though it takes place in Mexico. As such, there are sections that can be read as an insightful sociological treatise on the times.
I think you have to rate "Gold," "Silver" and "Green" as the best of this series, but don't overlook "Indigo" either.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Rocco Dormarunno on July 5, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If there is a weak link in the chain of Travis McGee novels, I have yet to find it. MacDonald's "Dress Her In Indigo" is yet another great tale in the long list of books of the McGee cycle, and I have read more than a dozen of them. This one has the same driving pace, magnetic and realistic characters, and acerbic wit as any other in the series.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 23, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A classic commentary on the 60s counterculture by John McD. A group of flower children are scattered across Mexico and have information concerning Bix Bowie's last days. As Meyer and McGee unravel the story, the gang starts dropping like flies. Several neat twists and a jawdropping finale. Reading this book brought back memories of old Dragnet and Adam-12 shows featuring the degenerate hippies. Trav gets more work in the bedroom than in any other I've read. Along the way he gets to pummel a homosexual AND a lesbian(not that there's anything OK with that, they just had it comin' to them).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Pete on January 8, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Read this series the first time while in the Navy as a teen. Now thirty years later I am on my third time through series, and each time I enjoy it as much if not more than the first time. John D. McDonald is a true master story teller, and Travis McGee is the hero we can all admire, envy and root for.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dave Wilde on August 14, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Instead of his usual haunts in the Florida marinas and the Gulf Coast swamps, “Dress Her In Indigo” takes Travis McGee on an adventure into the heart of Mexico. A rich man has been widowed and his only daughter disappeared into Mexico for months only to come back in a box. He wants to know what happened to her. McGee and a buddy (Meyer) head down to Oxaca to investigate, to ask questions, to find out what Bix’s last months were all about. Was she happy and just had a tragic accident or did something nefarious happen to her? The father never got to know his daughter well, but his instincts on this may have been right.

It’s the late Sixties and Bix ended up in Mexico in a camper with four other young people who fancied themselves hippies, dropping out from life in the States for a while. However, while from the outside, these hippies in the counterculture might all look similar without a care preaching flowers and rainbows, the truth is a little different. One trailer park owner in Oaxaca explains to McGee that there are a few categories and one is the predators who get their kicks out of turning the weaker kids on and taking monetary or sexual advantage of them or both. Another category, he explains, is the victims and some of the kids are just natural victims an seem to be looking for their own personal predator. These kids are susceptible once they get too far gone and end up down the drain. One of the boys in the camper with Bix was Rocko and he was a predator, one merciless son of a bitch. Another Jerry was a semi-predator. Carl, the guitar player, was already way down the drain and Bix, the blonde girl, didn’t look much like her picture anymore. She wasn’t too many steps behind Carl. “Cats tire of crippled mice that can’t scamper anymore,” he explained.
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