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Drifting into Darien: A Personal and Natural History of the Altamaha River (Wormsloe Foundation Nature Book) Hardcover – September 15, 2011


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Drifting into Darien: A Personal and Natural History of the Altamaha River (Wormsloe Foundation Nature Book) + The Seed Underground: A Growing Revolution to Save Food + Ecology of a Cracker Childhood (The World As Home)
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Product Details

  • Series: Wormsloe Foundation Nature Book
  • Hardcover: 280 pages
  • Publisher: A Wormsloe Foundation Nature Book (September 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 082033815X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0820338156
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.7 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #827,848 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"I found this book important, evocative, and lovingly written. There are many passages of great beauty, and the author's sincerity and knowledge radiate from every page. Her words sing, crackle, and tingle in the mind long afterward. The book offers a rich blend of local color, universal insight, humor, and environmental passion."—John Tallmadge, author of The Cincinnati Arch: Learning from Nature in the City



“Every endangered ecosystem should have such an eloquent spokesman.”—Bailey White



"Janisse Ray is, and has always been, the real authentic deal. She feels deeply about the land, the water, the life of this planet. She lives that conviction. And she is blessed with the gift to write about this earth in a way that touches us all. From one Georgia girl to another: Janisse, you and your work inspire me. Read her words. Be inspired."—Tina McElroy Ansa, Novelist, Baby of the Family, Ugly Ways, Taking After Mudear



"Other rivers are as storied, as well-loved, and as wild, writes Georgia poet and activist Janisse Ray, 'But the Altamaha is mine.' In this wonderfully fearless narrative, Ray takes her readers into the haunts of giant catfish and rare trees. Enormous blackberries picked in the Altamaha’s swamps, and cancer clusters that include close relations who live near a nuclear power plant, illustrate as never before the link between body and place. In the generously personal prose we count on from Janisse Ray, we are renewed by stories of people who have begun to 'reconcile themselves with their landscape, with their home, and with each other.' And we see how, as they do, Georgia’s irreplaceable 137-mile 'Little Amazon,' also begins to win."—Susan Cerulean, author of Tracking Desire: A Journey after Swallow-tailed Kites



"Ray, who danced nature writing into new and fertile terrain with An Ecology of a Cracker Childhood, introduces readers to one of the glories of the South, the Altamaha River. . . . Ray's encompassing, gracefully informative homage to what the Nature Conservancy has designated as one of the '75 Last Great Places' in the world is ecstatic and incensed."—Booklist


"An idiosyncratic and passionate book, Drifting Into Darien is Ray’s own call to the river—something between a poem and a prayer, a sermon and a scientific study, a memoir and a field journal. Opening with a week-long kayak trip made with a group of people in memory of the old rafting crews that floated logs down river several generations earlier (when there was still longleaf pine forest to cut), Ray mixes memories with modern-day observations and insight, and becomes a shaman and guide to the reader."—Nicki Leone, BiblioBuffet


“In Ray’s Drifting into Darien readers will feel the poetic beauty enjoyment, and power of paddling in Georgia’s Altamaha River.”—Bob Edmonds, McCormick Messenger


“Ray has produced an entertaining and provocative work with vivid descriptions. The book leads readers into thinking about their interactions with the world around them as it provides rich historical and cultural insight into this remarkable geographical feature. It also presents a compelling argument for preservation as opposed to greed.”— Atlanta Senior News

About the Author

Janisse Ray is the author of Pinhook: Finding Wholeness in a Fragmented Land, Wild Card Quilt: Taking a Chance on Home, the best-selling Ecology of a Cracker Childhood, and The Seed Underground: A Growing Revolution to Save Food. She is also the author of a poetry collection, A House of Branches, and coeditor of Between Two Rivers: Stories from the Red Hills to the Gulf. She lives in the Altamaha Community in Reidsville, Georgia.

More About the Author

Janisse Ray grew up in a junkyard along U.S. Highway 1. She is the author of Wild Card Quilt and Ecology of a Cracker Childhood, which won the American Book Award, as well as the Southern Book Critics Circle Award, Southeastern Booksellers Association Award for Nonfiction, and the Southern Environmental Law Center Award.

A naturalist, environmental activist, and winner of the 1996 Merriam Frontier Award, she has also published her work in Wild Earth, Orion, Florida Naturalist, and Georgia Wildlife and has been a nature commentator for Georgia Public Radio. She moved this year to Vermont, but still spends much of her time in Georgia.


Customer Reviews

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Hard to put down once you start reading her book.
Carly Lutsky
This book is excellent reading and informative on the natural history of the river.
Keith A. Bryant
They are well written and highlight some failings of our public policy makers.
Amazon Customer Dan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By J. Lardin on January 22, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Janisse Ray grew up in South Georgia, before industrialized agriculture and forestry became the accepted norm. She passionately loves the Altamaha River and the Georgia countryside, and laments it's continued destruction at the hands of brutal, soulless people and corporations. As a Georgia resident who spent some years growing up on a small farm in rural Georgia near the Ocmulgee River, which feeds into the Altamaha River, I share her despair at what is happening to this once exquisitely beautiful state. Our politicians and the lobbyists who own them are so profoundly short-sighted and greedy, and so corrupt, that most of the remaining natural beauty of this state is at risk of imminent ruin. What will be left for our children and grandchildren, and all the generations to come? They don't care.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer Dan on October 23, 2011
Format: Hardcover
For those of you who are already fans of Janisse Ray's writings you will not be disappointed. As with her other books, Drifting into Darien has a mix of nature and environmental activism along with many personal stories. Her passion for life and passion for caring for the natural world are clear. Some chapters, such as the one which discusses how the government classifies forests and ones about the destruction of our rivers are frustrating to read. They are well written and highlight some failings of our public policy makers. Others like the chapter on botanists were hilarious to read because I can see myself and certain friends fitting the description. All in all, a great read.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mary S. on November 13, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Janisse Ray is a writer whom I have enjoyed before reading this present book, Drifting into Darien. She shares a very personal and intense love of the Altamaha River and transmits this love to her readers with descriptions of the animals and plants surrounding the river. But the book will appeal to any person who cares about the environment and the future of our lives.
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By Sara on May 8, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very good book I also liked Ray;s first book.I felt that I was on the river with them.I will recommend to others.Enj
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By Cindy F. on January 6, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This story gave you insight to a different world of the Altamaha River and what it meant not only to the writer but to her family and community. Well written, a place I would love to visit.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Part fiery environmentalist's polemic, part homage to her home and her spiritual center, and a personal tribute to many of the individuals actively engaged in protecting and promoting that home today, Ray's "Drifting Into Darien" is an engaging read, especially for those of us who love Georgia's remaining wild places. (Full disclosure: I am originally from so far north, I don't even qualify as a "damned Yankee," being Canadian by birth, but I have called Georgia home for over 27 years now, almost half my adult life.) As we read, we learn that a river and its surrounding lands, its sources, its tributaries and its lasting effects on everything from agriculture to transportation are so much more than meets the eye. Ray draws us in, and makes us want to go out and work for our own places (of origin or of current residence) with the same white-hot love she feels for the Altamaha river basin, its swamps and floodplains, its rich zoology, its changing seasons, and its human inhabitants.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This renews my long-time wish to canoe on the Altamaha and hike along the edges.
I'd recommend it to any of my naturalist friends.
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