Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$20.23
Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.95
  • Save: $9.72 (32%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $5.33
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us Audio CD – Audiobook, January 21, 2010


See all 17 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Audio CD, Audiobook
"Please retry"
$20.23
$15.02 $19.00


Frequently Bought Together

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us + To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others
Price for both: $40.80

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Audio CD: 5 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Audio; Unabridged edition (January 21, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0143145088
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143145080
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 5.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (627 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #57,838 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for A Whole New Mind: 'My favourite business book.' Thomas L Friedman, author of The World Is Flat --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Daniel H. Pink is the New York Times bestselling author of A Whole New Mind and Free Agent Nation. He lectures to corporations, associations, and universities in the U.S. and abroad on economic transformation and the changing world of work. In 2007, he won a Japan Society Media Fellowship that took him to Tokyo to study the manga industry.
Daniel H. Pink is the New York Times bestselling author of A Whole New Mind and Free Agent Nation. He lectures to corporations, associations, and universities in the U.S. and abroad on economic transformation and the changing world of work. In 2007, he won a Japan Society Media Fellowship that took him to Tokyo to study the manga industry.

More About the Author

Daniel H. Pink is the author of five provocative books about the changing world of work -- including the long-running New York Times bestsellers, A Whole New Mind and Drive. His books have been translated into 34 languages and have sold more than 2 million copies worldwide.

Pink's latest book, To Sell is Human, is a #1 New York Times business bestseller, a #1 Wall Street Journal Business bestseller, and a #1 Washington Post nonfiction bestseller.

In 2013, Thinkers 50 named him one of the top 15 business thinkers in the world. He serves on the board of directors and advisory boards of several non-profits and startup companies.

A graduate of Northwestern University and Yale Law School, Pink lives in Washington, DC, with his wife and their three children.

Customer Reviews

The book is a very easy read, well written.
Bas Vodde
It is a book about life and how you can make your life (and work) better by focusing on the right things.
Robert T. Hess
This drive, Pink calls Motivation 3.0, is the intrinsic motivation to do a job well.
Corey Busch

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3,721 of 3,902 people found the following review helpful By Walter H. Bock on January 24, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Before plunking down your credit card for a copy of Drive, by Dan Pink, consider making do with just his TED talk. The talk contains the substance of this book without the excess padding.

The book has about 250 pages. One hundred fifty or so of those are for the basic content. It includes the Introduction and Parts I and II (chapters one through six).

The other hundred pages are a "Toolkit." This includes some material that didn't seem to fit anywhere else, a glossary, a recap of Drive, twenty conversation starters (useful at cocktail parties), a reading list, and a fitness plan. That's forty percent of the book. And none of it helps you put what you've read to work.

The core points of the book are covered in the TED talk. You can listen to it in about fifteen minutes or read it in about ten. You won't get the fitness plan or the conversation starters. You will get the essence of Pink's message.

If you're a boss or concerned about leadership, you need to become familiar with that message. The ideas are important. Pink's rendering of them, for good or ill, will define and influence the discussion of motivation in business for quite a while.

He does get the big picture right. He says that people would prefer activities where they can pursue three things.

Autonomy: People want to have control over their work.

Mastery: People want to get better at what they do.

Purpose: People want to be part of something that is bigger than they are.

This matches research that I've done with class members for over twenty-five years. They discuss a time when "it was great to come to work" and then create a description of what those times are like.
Read more ›
91 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
354 of 415 people found the following review helpful By David Field VINE VOICE on November 28, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Daniel Pink's new book follows well in the tradition of "A Whole New Mind," as he picks up on a new trend and explains it well. This time it's the apparent paradox of motivation - why do some people like Google pay their staff to regularly work on projects of their own choosing when they could be working hard on what they were hired to do?

Pink shows that there has always been monetary motivation, but that has lost its attractiveness as we've moved from the "top-down" management system to the more heuristic style (workers being free to decide how to do their jobs). He points out that repetitive jobs lend themselves more to traditional rewards, whereas money doesn't seem to motivate innovation.

I used to work for a major corporation (which we'll call "EMC," because that is their name). Pretty much everyone I met had responsibility for something, to the degree that supervisors were enablers - you went to them and told them what to do. Supervisors could (and sometimes did) give you reasons why not, but they weren't about to come into your cubicle and micromanage you. And the wider your responsibility, the harder you worked.

This system was totally unlike anything I'd come across before. Most businesses would act as though their employees couldn't be trusted. And although I was looking behind me nervously, I shone in this environment, and now I realized that's what they wanted from me.

Pink mentions Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs (if that's new to you, look it up on Wikipedia), and I think he is right that now that there's a relatively well-paid group of workers, they can ask for something more than basic salary.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
164 of 192 people found the following review helpful By John Chancellor TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 30, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Daniel Pink has written a highly interesting and very informative book on the truth about what motivates us.

He uses a very interesting analogy - comparing motivation to different generations of operating software. Motivation 1.0 the basic operating system for the first few thousand years was based on the primary needs of the human - food, shelter, clothing and reproduction. Eventually we moved to Motivation 2.0 - basically the carrot and the stick - reward and punishment worked fairly well for a time.

But according to Pink and other scientists, reward and punishment no longer work in most situations. We need to move to Motivation 3.0.

Pink goes into great detain about why the carrot and stick motivation does not work. "The traditional `If then' rewards can give us less of what we want. They extinguish intrinsic motivation, diminish performance, crush creativity and crowd out good behavior. The can encourage unethical behavior, create addictions and foster short-term thinking. These are the bugs in our current operating system."

The "if then" reward/punishment system does work under very limited conditions. Pink explores these.

He then introduces the I Type and X Type behavior - named for intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Type I behavior concerns itself less with external rewards and more with doing things for the joy of doing them.

There are three elements to the I Type behavior: Autonomy - we all long to be autonomous - to have control over our lives and destiny. To the extent that we don't have autonomy we feel something missing. The second element is Mastery. We need to learn to master the tasks we are undertaking. The third element is Purpose. We need to "buy in" to why we are doing things.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search