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Drive: The Surprising Truth about What Motivates Us
 
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Drive: The Surprising Truth about What Motivates Us [Unabridged] [Audible Audio Edition]

by Daniel H. Pink (Author, Narrator)
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (725 customer reviews)

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Editorial Reviews

A book that will change how you think and transform how you live.

Forget everything you thought you knew about how to motivate people - at work, at school, at home. It is wrong. As Daniel H. Pink explains in his paradigm-shattering book Drive, the secret to high performance and satisfaction in today's world is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and the world. Along the way, he takes us to companies that are enlisting new approaches to motivation, and introduces us to the scientists and entrepreneurs who are pointing a bold way forward.

©2011 Daniel H Pink; (P)2011 Canongate

Product Details

  • Audible Audio Edition
  • Listening Length: 5 hours and 58 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Canongate Books Ltd
  • Audible.com Release Date: February 9, 2011
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004N70DTE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (725 customer reviews)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3,932 of 4,120 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Biased and selective presentation of important ideas January 24, 2010
Format:Hardcover
Before plunking down your credit card for a copy of Drive, by Dan Pink, consider making do with just his TED talk. The talk contains the substance of this book without the excess padding.

The book has about 250 pages. One hundred fifty or so of those are for the basic content. It includes the Introduction and Parts I and II (chapters one through six).

The other hundred pages are a "Toolkit." This includes some material that didn't seem to fit anywhere else, a glossary, a recap of Drive, twenty conversation starters (useful at cocktail parties), a reading list, and a fitness plan. That's forty percent of the book. And none of it helps you put what you've read to work.

The core points of the book are covered in the TED talk. You can listen to it in about fifteen minutes or read it in about ten. You won't get the fitness plan or the conversation starters. You will get the essence of Pink's message.

If you're a boss or concerned about leadership, you need to become familiar with that message. The ideas are important. Pink's rendering of them, for good or ill, will define and influence the discussion of motivation in business for quite a while.

He does get the big picture right. He says that people would prefer activities where they can pursue three things.

Autonomy: People want to have control over their work.

Mastery: People want to get better at what they do.

Purpose: People want to be part of something that is bigger than they are.

This matches research that I've done with class members for over twenty-five years. They discuss a time when "it was great to come to work" and then create a description of what those times are like.
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368 of 431 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just as important as "A Whole New Mind" November 28, 2009
Format:Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Daniel Pink's new book follows well in the tradition of "A Whole New Mind," as he picks up on a new trend and explains it well. This time it's the apparent paradox of motivation - why do some people like Google pay their staff to regularly work on projects of their own choosing when they could be working hard on what they were hired to do?

Pink shows that there has always been monetary motivation, but that has lost its attractiveness as we've moved from the "top-down" management system to the more heuristic style (workers being free to decide how to do their jobs). He points out that repetitive jobs lend themselves more to traditional rewards, whereas money doesn't seem to motivate innovation.

I used to work for a major corporation (which we'll call "EMC," because that is their name). Pretty much everyone I met had responsibility for something, to the degree that supervisors were enablers - you went to them and told them what to do. Supervisors could (and sometimes did) give you reasons why not, but they weren't about to come into your cubicle and micromanage you. And the wider your responsibility, the harder you worked.

This system was totally unlike anything I'd come across before. Most businesses would act as though their employees couldn't be trusted. And although I was looking behind me nervously, I shone in this environment, and now I realized that's what they wanted from me.

Pink mentions Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs (if that's new to you, look it up on Wikipedia), and I think he is right that now that there's a relatively well-paid group of workers, they can ask for something more than basic salary.
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178 of 208 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Real Winner November 30, 2009
Format:Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Daniel Pink has written a highly interesting and very informative book on the truth about what motivates us.

He uses a very interesting analogy - comparing motivation to different generations of operating software. Motivation 1.0 the basic operating system for the first few thousand years was based on the primary needs of the human - food, shelter, clothing and reproduction. Eventually we moved to Motivation 2.0 - basically the carrot and the stick - reward and punishment worked fairly well for a time.

But according to Pink and other scientists, reward and punishment no longer work in most situations. We need to move to Motivation 3.0.

Pink goes into great detain about why the carrot and stick motivation does not work. "The traditional `If then' rewards can give us less of what we want. They extinguish intrinsic motivation, diminish performance, crush creativity and crowd out good behavior. The can encourage unethical behavior, create addictions and foster short-term thinking. These are the bugs in our current operating system."

The "if then" reward/punishment system does work under very limited conditions. Pink explores these.

He then introduces the I Type and X Type behavior - named for intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Type I behavior concerns itself less with external rewards and more with doing things for the joy of doing them.

There are three elements to the I Type behavior: Autonomy - we all long to be autonomous - to have control over our lives and destiny. To the extent that we don't have autonomy we feel something missing. The second element is Mastery. We need to learn to master the tasks we are undertaking. The third element is Purpose. We need to "buy in" to why we are doing things.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Read it!
Nice book, great ideas how to motivate yourself or others
Published 6 days ago by Roman
4.0 out of 5 stars Why most employers understand what makes their people tick.
Turns a lot of 'conventional wisdom' on its ear but claims have solid backing.
Published 7 days ago by Kirk Schlup
1.0 out of 5 stars This one got tossed to half price books after 30 ...
This one got tossed to half price books after 30 pages. Pink needs to find subject matters that have value.
Published 9 days ago by John J. Valentine
5.0 out of 5 stars Carrot and Stick Motivation is OUT
It was taught and instilled in my generation ‚€“ from childhood through college and management, that ‚€œcarrot and stick‚€Ě motivation was how one motivated people; from volunteers... Read more
Published 10 days ago by Gary Perman
5.0 out of 5 stars Enlightening
An enlightening read. Highly recommended.
Published 10 days ago by HADRIAN
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Great read!
Published 12 days ago by Trey T. Abston
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
This was for work of course.
Published 13 days ago by momof4inif
2.0 out of 5 stars Not worth your time
I found this book very frustrating to get through. Most of the rich content was regurgitation of other researchers' ideas and/or findings. Read more
Published 13 days ago by Ziffrus
4.0 out of 5 stars A stimulating read
I found this book engaging, thought provoking and with a simple, plausible and memorable theory at its core. Liked it a lot...
Published 14 days ago by adrian fingleton
5.0 out of 5 stars Some Surprising Truths
Interesting insight and logival reasoning. Listened to the book, but it confirmed some of the best practices, and some great personal insights that blow out of the water some of... Read more
Published 16 days ago by Rodeoboy
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